• GOP Unveils Its Obamacare Repeal and Replacement Legislation

    15 March 2017
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    Last week, on March 6th, the House Republicans unveiled their draft legislation that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This plan would ultimately continue the ACA’s premium tax credit through 2019 and then replace it in 2020. Then, a new credit for individuals without government insurance and those who are not offered insurance by their employer will be available.

    Additional details are provided below. Dagley & Co. wants you to keep in mind that the legislation is only a draft legislation and is subject to changes.

    Repeal of the Individual Mandate

    Background: Under the ACA, individuals are generally required to have ACA-compliant health insurance or face a “shared responsibility payment” (penalty for not being insured). For 2016, the annual penalty was $695 per uninsured individual ($347.50 per child), with a maximum penalty of $2,085 per family.

    GOP Legislation: Under the new legislation, this penalty would be repealed after 2015.

    Repeal of the Employer Mandate

    Background: Under the ACA, large employers, generally those with 50 or more equivalent full-time employees, were subject to penalties that could reach thousands of dollars per employee for not offering their full-time employees affordable health insurance. These employers were also subject to some very complicated reporting requirements.

    GOP Legislation: Under the new legislation, this penalty would be repealed after 2015.

    Recapture and Repeal of the Premium Tax Credit

    Background: The premium tax credit (PTC) is a health insurance subsidy for lower-income individuals, and it is based on their household income for the year. Since the household income can only be estimated at the beginning of the year, the insurance subsidy, known as the advance premium tax credit (APTC), must also be estimated at the beginning of the year. Then, when the tax return for the year is prepared, the difference between the estimated amount of the subsidy (APTC) and the actual subsidy allowed (PTC) is determined based on the actual household income for the year. If the subsidy paid was less than what the individual was entitled to, the excess is credited to the individual’s tax return. If the subsidy paid was more than what the individual was entitled to, the difference is repaid on the tax return. However, for lower-income taxpayers there is a cap on the amount that needs to repaid, and this is also based on household income.

    GOP Legislation: For tax years 2018 and 2019, the GOP legislation would require the repayment of the entire difference regardless of income. In addition, the PTC would be repealed after 2019.

    Catastrophic Insurance

    Background: The current law does not allow the PTC to be used for the purchase of catastrophic health insurance.

    GOP Legislation: The new legislation would allow premium tax credits to be used for the purchase of qualified “catastrophic-only” health plans and certain qualified plans not offered through an Exchange.

    Refundable Tax Credit for Health Insurance

    Beginning in 2020, as a replacement for the current ACA insurance subsidies (PTC), the GOP Legislation would create a universal refundable tax credit for the purchase of state-approved major medical health insurance and un-subsidized COBRA coverage. Generally eligible individuals are those who do not have access to government health insurance programs or an offer of insurance from any employer.

    The credit is determined monthly and ranges from $2,000 for those under age 30 to $4,000 for those over 60. The credit is additive for a family and capped at $14,000. The credit phases out for individuals who make more than $75,000 and for couples who file jointly and make more than $150,000.

    Health Savings Accounts

    Background: Individuals covered by high-deductible health plans can generally make tax-deductible contributions to a health savings account (HSA). Currently (2017), the maximum that can be contributed is $3,400 for self-only coverage and $6,750 for family coverage. Distributions from an HSA to pay qualified medical expenses are tax-free. However, non-qualified distributions are taxable and generally subject to a 20% penalty.

    GOP Legislation: Beginning in 2018, the HSA contribution limit would be increased to at least $6,550 for those with self-only coverage and to $13,100 for those with family coverage. In addition, the new legislation would do the following:

    • Allow both spouses to make catch-up contributions (applies to those age 55 through 64) beginning in 2018.
    • Allow medical expenses to be reimbursed if they were incurred 60 days prior to the establishment of the HSA (whereas currently only expenses incurred after the HSA is established qualify).
    • Lower the penalty for non-qualified distributions from the current 20% to 10% (the amount of the penalty prior to 2011).

    Medical Deduction Income Limitation

    Background: As part of the ACA, the income threshold for itemizing and deducting medical expenses was increased from 7.5% to 10% of the taxpayer’s AGI.

    GOP Legislation: Under the new legislation, the threshold would be returned to 7.5% beginning in 2018 (2017 for taxpayers age 65 or older).

    Repeal of Net Investment Income Tax

    Background: The ACA imposed a 3.8% surtax on net investment income for higher-income taxpayers, generally single individuals with incomes above $200,000 and $250,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly.

    GOP Legislation: The new legislation would repeal this tax after 2017.

    Repeal on FSA Contribution Limits

    Background: Flexible spending accounts (FSAs) generally allow employees to designate pre-tax funds that can be deposited in the employer’s FSA, which the employee can then use to pay for medical and other qualified expenses. Effective beginning in 2013, annual contributions to health FSAs (also referred to as cafeteria plans) were limited to an inflation-adjusted $2,500. For 2017, the inflation limitation is $2,550.

    GOP Legislation: The new legislation would remove the health FSA contribution limit, effective starting in 2017.

    Repeal of Increased Medicare Tax

    Background: Beginning in 2013, the ACA imposed an additional Medicare Hospital Insurance (HI) surtax of 0.9% on individuals with wage or self-employed income in excess of $200,000 or $250,000 for married couples filing jointly.

    GOP Legislation: The new legislation would repeal this surtax beginning in 2018.

    Other Provisions

    • Preexisting Conditions – Prohibits health insurers from denying coverage or charging more for preexisting conditions. However, to discourage people from waiting to buy health insurance until they are sick, individuals will need to maintain “continuous” coverage. Those who go uninsured for longer than a set period will be subject to 30% higher premiums as a penalty.
    • Children Under Age 26 – Allows children under age 26 to remain on their parents’ health plan until they are 26.
    • Small Business Health Insurance Tax Credit – Repealed after 2019
    • Medical Device Tax – Repealed after 2017
    • Tanning Tax – Repealed after 2018
    • Over-the-Counter Medication Tax – Repealed after 2017

    This is a proposed law change, and it may not ultimately turn out as described here. If you have any questions, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Ways To Deduct Health Insurance

    1 February 2016
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    In the wake of the “Affordable Care Act,” one of the largest and most substantially rising expenses are health insurance premiums. Although the cost of health insurance is allowed as part of an individual’s medical deductions when itemizing deductions, only the amount of total medical expenses that exceed 10% of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income (AGI) is deductible. The 10% limitation is reduced to 7.5% through 2016 where a taxpayer or spouse (if any) is age 65 or over as of the end of the year. Prior to the increased limitation imposed by the “Affordable Care Act,” the limitation was 7.5% for everyone.

    The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to remind you what insurance can be included as a medical deduction, and second, to inform you of an alternate means of deducting health insurance for certain self-employed individuals—a means that avoids the AGI limitation and allows for deduction without itemizing.

    Let’s start by looking at what is treated as deductible health insurance. It includes the premiums you pay for coverage for yourself, your dependents, and your spouse, if applicable, for the following types of plans: Health Care and Hospitalization Insurance, Long-Term Care Insurance (but limited based upon age), Medicare-B, Medicare-C (aka Medicare Advantage Plans), Medicare-D, Dental Insurance, Vision Insurance, and Premiums Paid through a Government Marketplace net of the Premium Tax Credit.

    However, premiums paid on your or your family’s behalf by your employer aren’t deductible because their cost is not included in your wage income. Or, if you pay premiums for coverage under your employer’s insurance plan through a “cafeteria” plan, those premiums aren’t deductible either because they are paid with pre-tax dollars.

    If you are a self-employed individual, you can deduct 100% (no AGI reduction) of the premiums without itemizing your deductions. This above-the-line deduction is limited to your net profits from self-employment. If you are a partner who performs services in the capacity of a partner and the partnership pays health insurance premiums on your behalf, those premiums are treated as guaranteed payments that are deductible by the partnership and are includible in your gross income. In turn, you may deduct the cost of the premiums as an above-the-line deduction under the rules discussed in this article.

    No above-the-line deduction is permitted when the self-employed individual is eligible to participate in a “subsidized” health plan maintained by an employer of the taxpayer, the taxpayer’s spouse, any dependent, or any child of the taxpayer who hasn’t attained age 27 as of the end of the tax year. This rule is applied separately to plans that provide coverage for long-term care services. Thus, an individual eligible for employer-subsidized health insurance may still be able to deduct long-term care insurance premiums, as long as he isn’t eligible for employer-subsidized long-term care insurance. In addition, to be treated as subsidized, 50% or more of the premium must be paid by the employer.

    This above-the-line deduction is also available to more-than-2% S corporation shareholders. For purposes of the income limitation, the shareholder’s wages from the S corporation are treated as his or her earned income.

    If you have any questions related to deducting health insurance premiums, either as an itemized deduction or an above-the-line deduction for self-employed individuals, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

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  • 5 Things You Should Know About the ACA in 2015

    23 June 2015
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    In recognition of the five-year anniversary of healthcare reform, we have put together a list of five things you should know about some of the key ACA requirements for businesses in 2015. It has been five years since the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the ACA) was signed into law. Healthcare reform has certainly been controversial, but this controversy does not absolve some businesses of certain responsibilities when it comes to offering minimum essential healthcare coverage to their employees.

    1. The shared responsibility provision of healthcare reform is effective either this year or next year, depending on how many employees you have. Also known as the employer mandate or “play or pay,” this provision requires companies with at least 50 full-time equivalent employees to offer minimum essential healthcare coverage to their full-time employees and their dependents. Or, such businesses — which are referred to by the law as applicable large employers (ALEs) — can pay a substantial non-deductible penalty if they prefer.

    Companies with 100 or more full-time employees (or full-time equivalents) must begin complying with the shared responsibility provision this year. Specifically, they must offer qualifying healthcare coverage to 70 percent or more of their full-time employees and their dependents this year and 95 percent of them in 2016. Meanwhile, companies with between 50 and 99 full-time employees or equivalents must begin complying with the shared responsibility provision next year.

    1. Depending on the size of your business, you might not be subject to the shared responsibility provision at all. There’s good news in the ACA for many small businesses. Companies with fewer than 50 full-time employees or equivalents are not subject to the shared responsibility this year or next year. However, if these businesses want to offer healthcare coverage to their employees, they can buy coverage on the Small Business Health Options Marketplace, or SHOP. This marketplace could lower small firms’ health insurance costs by giving them more buying power.
    2. The healthcare coverage your business provides employees under the ACA must meet certain criteria. Specifically, this coverage must be affordable and it must provide minimum value. Healthcare reform considers coverage to be “affordable” if employees’ share of their premiums doesn’t exceed 9.56 percent of their annual household income in 2015. And it considers “minimum value” to be a policy that covers at least 60 percent of the cost of healthcare services.
    3. Your business might qualify for a tax credit for contributions you make toward employees’ premiums. Small businesses with up to 25 full-time equivalent employees could receive a tax credit of up to 50 percent toward their contributions to employees’ healthcare premiums. To qualify, your business must pay at least half of the premiums and employees’ average annual wages in 2015 cannot be more than $51,600 (adjusted each year for inflation going forward). Also, this tax credit will be reduced if you had more than 10 full-time equivalent employees last year and/or employees’ average annual wages last year were more than $25,400 (also adjusted each year for inflation going forward).
    4. The ACA includes requirements to report coverage information to the IRS. ALEs are required to certify that they offered full-time employees and their dependents the opportunity to enroll in minimum essential healthcare coverage by filing Form 1094-C with the IRS. In addition, they must also issue a Form 1095-C employee statement to each full-time employee. These information-reporting requirements were voluntary this year for coverage provided in 2014, but they will be required next year for coverage provided in 2015.

    Be sure to contact Dagley & Co. with any questions about your company’s specific responsibilities under the ACA this year. You’ll find our contact information at the bottom of this page.

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