• Using Home Equity for Business Needs

    8 May 2017
    593 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    collateral

    Often times, small business owners find difficulties in obtaining financing for their businesses without putting their personal assets up as collateral. With this, tapping into your home equity is a tempting alternative but should be carefully considered.

    In general, interest on debt used to acquire and operate your business is deductible against that business. However, debt secured by your home may be nondeductible, only partially deductible or fully deductible against your business.

    Home mortgage interest is limited to the interest on $1 million of acquisition debt and $100,000 of equity debt secured by a taxpayer’s primary residence and designated second home. The interest on the debts within these limits can only be treated as home mortgage interest and must be deducted as part of your itemized deductions. Only the excess can be deducted for your business, provided that the use of the funds can be traced to your business use. This creates a number of problems:

    • Using the Standard Deduction – If you do not itemize your deductions, you will be unable to deduct the interest on the first $100,000 of the equity debt, which cannot be allocated to your business.
    • Subject to the AMT – Even if you do itemize your deductions, if you happen to be subject to the alternative minimum tax (AMT), you still would not be able to deduct the first $100,000 of equity debt interest, since it is not allowed as a deduction for AMT purposes.
    • Subject to Self-Employment (SE) Tax – Your self-employment tax (Social Security and Medicare) is based on the net profits from your business. If the net profit is higher, because not all of the interest is deductible by the business, your SE tax may also be higher.

    Example: Suppose the mortgage you incurred to purchase your home (acquisition debt) has a current balance of $165,000 and your home is worth $400,000. You need $150,000 to acquire a new business. To obtain the needed cash at the best interest rates, you decide to refinance your home mortgage for $315,000. The interest on this new loan will be allocated as follows:

    New Loan:                                                  $ 315,000

    Part Representing Acquisition Debt                 <165,000>  52.38%

    Balance                                                      $ 150,000     

    First $100,000 Treated as Home Equity Debt    <100,000>  31.75%

    Balance Traced to Business Use                     $ 50,000      15.87%

    If the interest for the year on the refinanced debt was $10,000, then that interest would be deducted as follows:

    Itemized Deduction Regular Tax                     $ 8,413         84.13%

    Itemized Deduction Alternative Minimum Tax   $ 5,238         52.38%

    Business Expense                                        $ 1,587         15.87%        

    There is a special tax election that allows you to treat any specified home loan as not secured by the home. If you file this election, then interest on the loan can no longer be deducted as home mortgage interest, since tax law requires that qualified home mortgage debt be secured by the home. However, this election would allow the normal interest tracing rules to apply to that unsecured debt. This might be a smart move if the entire proceeds were used for business and all of the interest expense could be treated as a business expense. However, if the loan were a mixed-use loan and part of it actually represented home debt (such as a refinanced home loan), then the part that represented the home debt could not be allocated back to the home, and the interest on that portion of the debt would become nondeductible and would provide no tax benefit.

    As you can see, using equity from your home can create some complex tax situations. Please contact Dagley & Co. for assistance in determining the best solution for your particular tax situation.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Image via public domain

    Continue Reading
  • Naming Your IRA Beneficiary

    24 April 2017
    600 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    Available Lease Signature Contract

    Designating a beneficiary of your traditional IRA is critically important and more complicated than you may realize. This decision will affect the minimum amounts that you must withdraw from the IRA when you reach age 70 ½, who will get what remains in the account after your death, and how that IRA balance can be paid out to beneficiaries.

    What’s more, a periodic review of whom you’ve named as IRA beneficiaries is vital to ensure that your overall estate planning objectives will be achieved in light of changes in the performance of your IRAs and in your personal, financial, and family situation. For example, if your spouse was named as your beneficiary when you first opened the account several years ago and you’ve subsequently divorced, your ex-spouse will remain the beneficiary of your IRA unless you notify your IRA custodian to change the beneficiary designation.

    The issue of naming a trust as the beneficiary of an IRA comes up regularly. There is no tax advantage to naming a trust as the IRA beneficiary. Of course, there may be a non-tax-related reason, such as controlling a beneficiary’s access to money; thus, naming a trust rather than an individual(s) as the beneficiary of an IRA could achieve that goal. However, that is not typically the case. Naming a trust as the beneficiary of an IRA eliminates the ability for multiple beneficiaries to maximize the opportunity to stretch the required minimum distributions (RMDs) over their individual life expectancies.

    Generally, trusts are drafted so that IRA RMDs will pass through the trust directly to the individual trust beneficiary and, therefore, be taxed at the beneficiary’s income tax rate. However, if the trust does not permit distribution to the beneficiary, then the RMDs will be taxed at the trust level, which has a tax rate of 39.6% on any taxable income in excess of $12,500 (2017 rate). This high tax rate applies at a much lower income level than for individuals.

    Distributions from traditional IRAs are always taxable whether they are paid to you or, upon your death, paid to your beneficiaries. Once you reach age 70 ½, you are required to begin taking distributions from your IRA. If your spouse is your beneficiary, he or she can delay distributions until he or she reaches age 70 ½ if your spouse is under the age of 70 ½ upon inheritance of your IRA. The rules are tougher for non-spousal beneficiaries, who generally must begin taking distributions based upon a complicated set of rules.

    Since IRA distributions are taxable to beneficiaries, beneficiaries usually wish to spread the taxation over a number of years. However, the tax code limits the number of years based on whether the decedent has begun his or her age 70 ½ RMDs at the time of his or her death.

    To ensure that your IRA will pass to your chosen beneficiary or beneficiaries, be certain that the beneficiary form on file with the custodian of your IRA reflects your current wishes. These forms allow you to designate both primary and alternate individual beneficiaries. If there is no beneficiary form on file, the custodian’s default policy will dictate whether the IRA will go first to a living person or to your estate.

    This is a simplified overview of the issues related to naming a beneficiary and the impact on post-death distributions. Uncle Sam wants the tax paid on the distributions, and the rules pertaining to how and when beneficiaries must take taxable distributions are very complicated.

    It should also be noted that some members of Congress have expressed their displeasure with stretch-out IRAs that have permitted some beneficiaries to extend for decades the payout period from the IRAs they inherited. These legislators would prefer that total distribution from inherited IRAs be made within five years after the IRA owner’s death. So it is possible that we will see tax law changes in this area.

    It may be appropriate to consult with Dagley & Co. regarding your particular circumstances before naming beneficiaries.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Image via public domain

     

     

     

     

    Continue Reading
  • Tax Filing Deadline Rapidly Approaching

    29 March 2016
    846 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    Death_to_stock_Marzocco_Coffee_7

    Sit down and get to work. Tax day is just a few weeks away! For those of you who have not yet filed their 2015 tax return, tax day is the due date to either file your return and pay any taxes owed, or file for the automatic six-month extension and pay the tax you estimate to be due. Usually April 15 is the due date, but because Friday, April 15, is a legal holiday in the District of Columbia (where the IRS is headquartered), the filing date is advanced to the next day that isn’t a weekend or holiday – Monday, April 18 – even for taxpayers not living in DC.

    In addition, the April 18, 2016 deadline also applies to the following:

    Tax year 2015 balance-due payments – Taxpayers that are filing extensions are cautioned that the filing extension is an extension to file, NOT an extension to pay a balance due.  Late payment penalties and interest will be assessed on any balance due, even for returns on extension.  Taxpayers anticipating a balance due will need to estimate this amount and include their payment with the extension request.

    Tax year 2015 contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA – April 18 is the last day contributions for 2015 can be made to either a Roth or traditional IRA, even if an extension is filed.

    Individual estimated tax payments for the first quarter of 2016 – Taxpayers, especially those who have filed for an extension, are cautioned that the first installment of the 2016 estimated taxes are due on April 18.  If you are on extension and anticipate a refund, all or a portion of the refund can be allocated to this quarter’s payment on the final return when it is filed at a later date. If the refund won’t be enough to fully cover the first installment, you may need to make a payment with the April 18 voucher. Please call this office for any questions.

    Individual refund claims for tax year 2012 – The regular three-year statute of limitations expires on April 18 for the 2012 tax return.  Thus, no refund will be granted for a 2012 original or amended return that is filed after April 18. Caution: The statute does not apply to balances due for unfiled 2012 returns.

    Note: The deadline for any of the above actions is increased by an additional day, to April 19, 2016, for taxpayers who live in Maine or Massachusetts because of a holiday observed on the 18th in Massachusetts which affects the IRS Service Center located in Massachusetts that serves these two states.

    If this office is holding up the completion of your returns because of missing information, please forward that information as quickly as possible in order to meet the April 18 deadline.  Keep in mind that the last week of tax season is very hectic, and your returns may not be completed if you wait until the last minute.  If it is apparent that the information will not be available in time for the April 18 deadline, then let the office know right away so that an extension request, and 2016 estimated tax vouchers if needed, may be prepared.

    If your returns have not yet been completed, please call Dagley & Co. right away so that we can schedule an appointment and/or file an extension if necessary.

    Image via. public domain

    Continue Reading
  • Not All Home Mortgage Interest Is Deductible; The IRS is Watching

    10 February 2016
    608 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    houses-202151_960_720

    The IRS is watching and currently they are checking to see if taxpayers are deducting too much home equity debt interest. But you need to know that not all home-mortgage interest is deductible. Generally, taxpayers are allowed to deduct the interest on up to $1 million of home acquisition debt (includes subsequent debt incurred to make improvements, but not repairs) and the interest on up to $100,000 of home equity debt. Equity debt is debt not incurred to acquire or improve the home. Taxpayers frequently exceed the equity debt limit and fail to adjust their interest deduction accordingly.

    The best way to explain this interest deduction limitation is by example. Let’s assume you have never refinanced the original loan that was used to purchase your home, and the current principal balance of that acquisition debt is less than $1 million. However, you also have a line of credit on the home, and the debt on that line of credit is treated as equity debt. If the balance on that line of credit is $120,000, then you have exceeded the equity debt limitation and only 83.33% ($100,000/$120,000) of the equity line interest is deductible as home mortgage interest on Schedule A. The balance is not deductible unless you can trace the use of the excess debt to either investment or business use. If traceable to investments, the interest you pay on the amount traceable would be deductible as investment interest, which is also deducted on Schedule A but is limited to an amount equal to your net investment income (investment income less investment expenses). If the excess debt was used for business, you could deduct the interest on that excess debt on the appropriate business schedule.

    Alternatively, the IRS allows you to elect to treat the equity line debt as “not secured” by the home, which would allow the interest on the entire equity debt to be traced to its use and deducted on the appropriate schedule if deductible. For instance, you borrow from the equity line for a down payment on a rental. If you make the “not secured” election, the interest on the amount borrowed for the rental down payment would be deductible on the Schedule E rental income and expense schedule and not subject to the home equity debt limitations.

    However, one of the rules that allows home mortgage interest to be deductible is it must be secured by the home, and if the unsecured election is used, none of the interest can be traced back to the home itself. So, for example, if the equity line was used partly for the rental down payment and partially for personal reasons, the interest associated with the personal portion of the loan would not be deductible since you elected to treat it as not secured by your home.

    Using the unsecured election can have unexpected results in the current year and in the future. You should use that election only after consulting with this office.

    Generally, people not familiar with the sometimes complicated rules associated with home mortgage interest believe the interest shown on the Form 1098 issued by their lenders at the end of the year is fully deductible. In many cases when taxpayers have refinanced or have equity loans, that may be far from the truth and could result in an IRS inquiry and potential multi-year adjustments. In fact, for Forms 1098 issued after 2016 (thus effective for 2016 information), the IRS will be requiring lenders to include additional information, including the amount of the outstanding mortgage principal as of the beginning of the calendar year, the mortgage origination date and the address of the property securing the mortgage, which will provide the IRS with additional tools for audits.

    When in doubt about how much interest you can deduct or if you have questions about how refinancing or taking on additional home mortgage debt will impact your taxes, please Dagley & Co. for assistance.

    Image via. public domain

    Continue Reading