• April 2017 Individual Due Dates

    31 March 2017
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    April is an important month for many as tax season comes to a close. If you have not filed your tax returns, please reach out to Dagley & Co. and we can set up a one-on-one appointment before Tax Day on April 18th. Here are all your important individual due dates for the month of April:

    April 1 – Last Day to Withdraw Required Minimum Distribution

    Last day to withdraw 2016’s required minimum distribution from Traditional or SEP IRAs for taxpayers who turned 70½ in 2016. Failing to make a timely withdrawal may result in a penalty equal to 50% of the amount that should have been withdrawn. Taxpayers who became 70½ before 2016 were required to make their 2016 IRA withdrawal by December 31, 2016.

    April 10 –  Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during March, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than April 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    April 15 – Taxpayers with Foreign Financial Interests

    A U.S. citizen or resident, or a person doing business in the United States, who has a financial interest in or signature or other authority over any foreign financial accounts (bank, securities or other types of financial accounts), in a foreign country, is required to file Form FinCEN 114. The form must be filed electronically; paper forms are not allowed. The form must be filed with the Treasury Department (not the IRS) no later than April 15, 2017 for 2016. An extension of time to file of up to 6 months may be requested This filing requirement applies only if the aggregate value of these financial accounts exceeds $10,000 at any time during 2016. Contact our office for additional information and assistance filing the form or requesting an extension.

    April 18 –  Individual Tax Returns Due

    File a 2016 income tax return (Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ) and pay any tax due. If you want an automatic six-month extension of time to file the return, please call this office.

    Caution: The extension gives you until October 16, 2017 to file your 2016 1040 return without being liable for the late filing penalty. However, it does not avoid the late payment penalty; thus, if you owe money, the late payment penalty can be severe, so you are encouraged to file as soon as possible to minimize that penalty. Also, you will owe interest, figured from the original due date until the tax is paid. If you have a refund, there is no penalty; however, you are giving the government a free loan, since they will only pay interest starting 45 days after the return is filed. Please call this office to discuss your individual situation if you are unable to file by the April 18 due date.

    Note: the normal April 15 due date is a Saturday, and the following Monday is a federal holiday in the District of Columbia, so for almost all individuals their 2016 Form 1040 returns aren’t due until the next business day, which is Tuesday, April 18.

    April 18 – Household Employer Return Due

    If you paid cash wages of $2,000 or more in 2016 to a household employee, you must file Schedule H. If you are required to file a federal income tax return (Form 1040), file Schedule H with the return and report any household employment taxes. Report any federal unemployment (FUTA) tax on Schedule H if you paid total cash wages of $1,000 or more in any calendar quarter of 2015 or 2016 to household employees. Also, report any income tax that was withheld for your household employees. For more information, please call this office.

    April 18 – Estimated Tax Payment Due (Individuals)

    It’s time to make your first quarter estimated tax installment payment for the 2017 tax year. Our tax system is a “pay-as-you-go” system. To facilitate that concept, the government has provided several means of assisting taxpayers in meeting the “pay-as-you-go” requirement. These include:

    • Payroll withholding for employees;
    • Pension withholding for retirees; and
    • Estimated tax payments for self-employed individuals and those with other sources of income not covered by withholding.

    When a taxpayer fails to prepay a safe harbor (minimum) amount, they can be subject to the underpayment penalty. This penalty is equal to the federal short-term rate plus 3 percentage points, and the penalty is computed on a quarter-by-quarter basis.

    Federal tax law does provide ways to avoid the underpayment penalty. If the underpayment is less than $1,000 (the “de minimis amount”), no penalty is assessed. In addition, the law provides “safe harbor” prepayments. There are two safe harbors:

    • The first safe harbor is based on the tax owed in the current year. If your payments equal or exceed 90% of what is owed in the current year, you can escape a penalty.
    • The second safe harbor is based on the tax owed in the immediately preceding tax year. This safe harbor is generally 100% of the prior year’s tax liability. However, for taxpayers whose AGI exceeds $150,000 ($75,000 for married taxpayers filing separately), the prior year’s safe harbor is 110%.

    Example: Suppose your tax for the year is $10,000 and your prepayments total $5,600. The result is that you owe an additional $4,400 on your tax return. To find out if you owe a penalty, see if you meet the first safe harbor exception. Since 90% of $10,000 is $9,000, your prepayments fell short of the mark. You can’t avoid the penalty under this exception.

    However, in the above example, the safe harbor may still apply. Assume your prior year’s tax was $5,000. Since you prepaid $5,600, which is greater than 110% of the prior year’s tax (110% = $5,500), you qualify for this safe harbor and can escape the penalty.

    This example underscores the importance of making sure your prepayments are adequate, especially if you have a large increase in income. This is common when there is a large gain from the sale of stocks, sale of property, when large bonuses are paid, when a taxpayer retires, etc. Timely payment of each required estimated tax installment is also a requirement to meet the safe harbor exception to the penalty. If you have questions regarding your safe harbor estimates, please call this office as soon as possible.

    CAUTION: Some state de minimis amounts and safe harbor estimate rules are different than those for the Federal estimates. Please call this office for particular state safe harbor rules.

    April 18 – Last Day to Make Contributions

    Last day to make contributions to Traditional and Roth IRAs for tax year 2016.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Tax Filing Deadline Is Around the Corner

    29 March 2017
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    REMINDER: April 18, 2017 is the due date to file your return(s), pay any taxes owed, or file for a six-month extension. It is important to know that with this extension you will end up paying the tax you estimate to be due.

    In addition, this deadline also applies to the following:

    • Tax year 2016 balance-due payments – Taxpayers that are filing extensions are cautioned that the filing extension is an extension to file, NOT an extension to pay a balance due.  Late payment penalties and interest will be assessed on any balance due, even for returns on extension.  Taxpayers anticipating a balance due will need to estimate this amount and include their payment with the extension request.
    • Tax year 2016 contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA – April 18 is the last day contributions for 2016 can be made to either a Roth or traditional IRA, even if an extension is filed.
    • Individual estimated tax payments for the first quarter of 2017 – Taxpayers, especially those who have filed for an extension to file their 2016 return, are cautioned that the first installment of the 2017 estimated taxes are due on April 18.  If you are on extension and anticipate a refund, all or a portion of the refund can be allocated to this quarter’s payment on the final return when it is filed at a later date. If the refund won’t be enough to fully cover the April 18 installment, you may need to make a payment with the April 18 voucher. Please call this office for any questions.
    • Individual refund claims for tax year 2013 – The regular three-year statute of limitations expires on April 18 for the 2013 tax return.  Thus, no refund will be granted for a 2013 original or amended return that is filed after April 18. Caution: The statute does not apply to balances due for unfiled 2013 returns.

    If Dagley  & Co. is holding up the completion of your returns because of missing information, please forward that information as quickly as possible in order to meet the April 18 deadline.  Keep in mind that the last week of tax season is very hectic, and your returns may not be completed if you wait until the last minute.  If it is apparent that the information will not be available in time for the April 18 deadline, then let the office know right away so that an extension request, and 2017 estimated tax vouchers if needed, may be prepared.

    If your returns have not yet been completed, please call Dagley & Co. right away so that we can schedule an appointment and/or file an extension if necessary.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Missed a 60-Day Rollover? There May Be Relief

    26 January 2017
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    Miss a 60-day rollover? According to the IRA, the acceptable reasons for missing include: An error was committed by the financial institution, the distribution check was misplaced and never cashed, the distribution was mistakenly deposited into an account that the taxpayer thought was an eligible retirement plan, the taxpayer’s principal residence was severely damaged, a member of the taxpayer’s family died, the taxpayer or a member of the taxpayer’s family was seriously ill, the taxpayer was incarcerated, restrictions were imposed by a foreign country, a postal error occurred, or the distribution was made on account of an IRS levy, and the proceeds of the levy have been returned to the taxpayer. If you, or someone you know, fall into any of these situations, as a taxpayer, you can take a distribution from an IRA or other qualified retirement plan and if they roll it over within 60 days they can avoid taxation on the distributed amount.

    Financial Institution Error – Where the failure to meet the deadline is due to financial institution error, the IRS provides an automatic waiver.

    Private Letter Ruling (PLR) – Where automatic waiver does not apply, and the taxpayer feels there is a legitimate reason for missing the 60-day rollover requirement, the taxpayer can request relief though a PLR where the IRS reviews the reason for missing the 60-day rollover period and either allows or denies relief from the 60-day requirement. However, the IRS will charge the taxpayer requesting the PLR a user fee of $10,000, which negates the purpose of a PLR except in cases of very large rollover amounts.

    New Self-Certification Procedure – The IRS recently announced a new certification procedure that allows a taxpayer who misses the 60-day time limit for properly rolling the amount into another retirement plan or IRA to make a written certification to a plan administrator or an IRA trustee that a contribution satisfies one of the acceptable reasons, and therefore is eligible for a waiver of the 60-day rule.

    Please remember: This provision does not apply to required minimum distributions for taxpayers who are 70.5 years of age and over.). Also, taxpayers are limited to one IRA-to-IRA rollover per year.

    The rollover must be completed as soon as practicable after the reason(s) listed above no longer prevent the taxpayer from making the contribution. This requirement is deemed to be satisfied if the contribution is made within 30 days after the reason(s) no longer prevent the taxpayer from making the contribution.

    This procedure does not apply where the IRS previously denied a waiver request for the same missed rollover.

    The IRS provides a model letter that can be used to make the self-certification. Please call Dagley & Co. if you need a copy of the letter, have questions, or need assistance related to a missed 60-day rollover.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Tax Benefits for Single Parents

    7 December 2016
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    Are you a single parent? If so, we all know that working and raising a family can become extremley difficult on your own. For your benefit, Dagley & Co. has found a number of tax benefits/issues that you should be aware of. Please carefully read and understand the following:

    Filing Status – Just because you are single or widowed does not mean you have to file your tax returns using the single filing status. Tax law provides two far more beneficial filing statuses that you might qualify for. These statuses provide higher standard deductions and more beneficial tax rates:

    Head of Household – If you are unmarried and pay more than half the cost of maintaining a household that is the principal place of abode for your qualified child or children for more than one-half of the year, then you qualify for the head of household status. Qualified children generally include your children, grandchildren, foster children or stepchildren under the age of 19 or a full-time student under the age of 24 who is not self-supporting.  This is true even if you allow the other parent to deduct the dependency exemption for the child.

    Qualified Widow – If you are widowed, you may qualify for the head of household status discussed just above.  However, if your spouse passed away in one of the two prior years, you have a child or stepchild (not including a foster child or grandchild) whom you can claim as a dependent and who lived with you the whole year, and you paid more than half the cost of keeping up the home, you can use the higher standard deduction for married individuals filing jointly. In comparison, in 2016, the standard deduction for marrieds filing jointly is $12,600, which is twice the amount for a single individual.

    Child Support – Any child support you receive from the non-custodial parent is tax-free to you. Child support is also not included in household income for the purposes of determining the premium tax credit if you are otherwise qualified and obtain your health insurance through a government marketplace.

    Alimony – In most cases alimony payments received from your former spouse must be included in your income and are subject to tax. However, you can treat the alimony as earned income for purposes of making an IRA contribution of as much as $5,500 ($6,500 for those age 50 and over).

    Exemptions – You are entitled to an exemption allowance of $4,050 for yourself and each of your children and others whom you claim as dependents on your tax return. Generally, the custodial parent will be the one eligible to claim a child’s exemption allowance. The value of the exemptions you claim is subtracted from your gross income when you are figuring out the amount of your taxable income. For example, if you are in the 25% tax bracket, each exemption allowance you deduct saves you $1,013 of tax. However, if you allow the non-custodial parent to claim the exemption of a qualified child, then you forego the $4,050 exemption allowance for that child.

    Releasing the exemption of a child to the noncustodial parent must be done in writing and to IRS’s specifications as to required information. The noncustodial parent must then attach the written form to his or her return. The release can be for one year, for specified years or for all future years. If the exemption for the child is released, then the noncustodial parent will be able to claim the child tax credit (discussed below). Note: If a child is older and attending college, keep in mind when relinquishing the child’s exemption that the partially refundable tuition credit goes to the one who claims the child.

    Child Care Credit – If your child or children are under age 13, and you are working or attending school, you may qualify for the non-refundable child and dependent care credit, which is based upon the amount of your earnings from working (or imputed income if attending school) and the amount of child care expenses, up to $3,000 for one child and $6,000 for two or more children. The credit can be as much as $1,050 for one child and $2,100 for two.

    Child Tax Credit – You are also entitled to a non-refundable tax credit of $1,000 for each child under the age of 17 that you claim as a dependent. However, this credit begins to phase out for those filing as head of household with incomes in excess of $75,000. Some taxpayers with lower income may qualify for some portion of this credit to be refundable.

    Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) – If you are working, you may also qualify for the EITC. This refundable credit is available to lower-income taxpayers and is based on your income and the number of children you have, up to three. The maximum credits for 2016 are $506 with no children, $3,373 with one, $5,572 with two, and $6,269 with three or more. The credit is totally phased out at incomes of $14,880 with no children, $39,296 with one, $44,648 with two, and $47,955 with three or more.

    As you can see, there are a number of tax benefits that apply to single parents. As always, please contact Dagley & Co. with any questions or issues. If you are a custodial parent, before releasing your child’s exemption to the noncustodial parent, you may wish to contact Dagley & Co. so the tax impact on your return(s) can be determined.

     

     

     

     

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  • Time to Start Thinking About Year-End Tax Moves

    21 November 2016
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    With 2017 just around the corner, it is time to think about actions you can take to improve your tax situation from 2016. In our opinion, this is something you probably want to get out of the way before the holiday season arrives. Dagley & Co. is always here to help in anyway possible in terms of your tax situations for both present and upcoming years.

    There are many steps that you can take before January 1 to save a considerable amount of tax. Here are a few that we gathered:

    Maximize Education Tax Credits – If you qualify for either the American Opportunity or Lifetime Learning education credits, check to see how much you will have paid in qualified tuition and related expenses in 2016. If it is not the maximum allowed for computing the credits, you can prepay 2017 tuition as long as it is for an academic period beginning in the first three months of 2017. That will allow you to increase the credit for 2016. This technique is especially helpful when a student has just started college in the fall.

    Roth IRA Conversions – If your income is unusually low this year, you may wish to consider converting some or all of your traditional IRA into a Roth IRA. The lower income results in a lower tax rate, which provides you an opportunity to convert to a Roth IRA at a lower tax amount.

    Don’t Forget Your Minimum Required Distribution – If you are over 70.5 years of age and have not taken your 2016 required minimum distribution from your IRA or qualified retirement plan, you should do that before December 31 to avoid possible penalties. If you turned 70.5 this year, you may delay your 2016 distribution until the first quarter of 2017, but that will mean a double distribution in 2017 that will be taxed.

    Advance Charitable Deductions – If you regularly tithe at a house of worship or make pledges to other qualified charities, you might consider pre-paying part or all of your 2017 tithing or pledge, thus advancing the deduction into 2016. This can be especially helpful to individuals who marginally itemize their deductions, allowing them to itemize in one year and then take the standard deduction in the next. If you are age 70.5 or over, you can also take advantage of a direct IRA-to-charity transfer, which will count toward your RMD and may even reduce the taxes on your Social Security income.

    Maximize Health Savings Account Contributions If you become eligible to make health savings account (HSA) contributions late this year, you can make a full year’s worth of deductible HSA contributions even if you were not eligible to make HSA contributions earlier in the year. This opportunity applies even if you first become eligible in December.

    Prepay Taxes – Both state income and property taxes are deductible if you itemize your deductions and you are not subject to the AMT. Prepaying them advances the deductions onto your 2016 return. So if you expect to owe state income tax, it may be appropriate to increase your state withholding tax at your place of employment or make an estimated tax payment before the close of 2016, and if you are paying your real property taxes in installments, pay the next installment before year-end.

    Pay Tax-deductible Medical Expenses – If you have outstanding medical or dental bills, paying the balance before year-end may be beneficial, but only if you already meet the 10% of AGI floor for deducting medical expenses, or if adding the payments would put you over the 10% threshold. You can even use a credit card to pay the expenses, but if you won’t be paying off the full balance on the card right away, do so only if the interest expense on the credit card is less than the tax savings. You might also wish to consider scheduling and paying for medical expenses such as glasses, dental work, etc., before the end of the year. See the “Seniors Beware” article if you or your spouse is age 65 and over.

    Take Advantage of the Annual Gift Tax Exemption – You can give $14,000 to each of an unlimited number of individuals without paying gift tax each year, but you can’t carry over unused amounts from one year to the next. (The gifts are not tax deductible.)

    Avoid Underpayment Penalties – If you are going to owe taxes for 2016, you can take steps before year-end to avoid or minimize the underpayment penalty. The penalty is applied quarterly, so making a fourth-quarter estimated payment only reduces the fourth-quarter penalty. However, withholding is treated as paid ratably throughout the year, so increasing withholding at the end of the year can reduce the penalties for the earlier quarters.

    There are many different factors that go into each of the steps above. We  encourage all of our clients to contact Dagley & Co. prior to acting on any of the advice to ensure that you will benefit given your specific tax circumstances. Our phone number is: (202) 417-6640 and email: info@dagleyco.com.

     

     

     

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  • Tips for Holiday Charity Giving

    31 October 2016
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    The holiday season is quickly approaching. With this, means charity donations. Little do some people know, it is also the time of year when scammers show up in force, pretending to be legitimate charities in hopes of swindling you. Even though this next few months will be busy, do not overlook the documentation needed to verify your generosity for tax purposes. Check out these tips for charitable giving:

    Documentation – To claim a charitable deduction, you must itemize your deductions; if you don’t, there is no need to keep any records of your donations. There are two types of charitable gifts: monetary and property.

    Monetary donations include those made by cash, check, credit card, or other means. This type of contribution is only deductible if the donor maintains a record of the contribution in the form of either a bank record (such as a cancelled check) or a written communication from the charity (such as a receipt or a letter) showing the name of the charity, the date of the contribution, and the amount of the contribution. In addition, if the contribution is $250 or more, the donor must also get an acknowledgment from the charity for each deductible donation. Keep in mind that dropping cash in a holiday donation kettle without any documentation is not deductible.

    Non-cash holiday contributions to organizations such as Toys for Tots and to seasonal food drives by recognized charities are also deductible. The deductible amount is the fair market value (FMV) of the items at the time of the donation, and you must document your donation with a detailed list of what was given and the name of the charity receiving the gift. Where the FMV of your gifts is $250 or more, you must also obtain an acknowledgment from the charity for each deductible donation. When gifts of property are $500 or more, there are additional record keeping requirements, so please call for details if you plan to make gifts of this value.

    Watch Out for Charity Scams – To avoid scammers getting your charitable donations, make sure you are contributing to a legitimate charity and not to a bunch of crooks who work overtime during the holidays to trick you out of money.

    Be wary of charities with names that are similar to familiar or nationally known organizations. Some phony charities use names or websites that sound or look like those of respected, legitimate organizations.

    When in doubt, you should take a few extra minutes to ensure your gifts are going to legitimate charities. IRS.gov has a search feature—Exempt Organizations Select Check—that allows you to find legitimate, qualified charities to which donations may be tax deductible.

    Disaster Scams – In the wake of significant natural disasters, such as Hurricane Matthew, it’s common for scam artists to impersonate charities to get money or private information from well-intentioned taxpayers. Scam artists use a variety of tactics including contacting people by telephone or email to solicit money or financial information, and they may even set up phony websites that claim to solicit funds on behalf of disaster victims.

    Watch Out for ID Thieves – Don’t give out personal financial information such as your Social Security number or passwords to anyone who solicits a contribution from you. Scam artists may use this information to steal your identity and money. Using a credit card to make legitimate donations is quite common, but please be very careful when you are speaking with someone who called you; don’t give out your credit card number unless you are certain the caller represents a legal charity.

    Don’t be a victim! Make sure you are donating to recognized charities. If you have questions, please give us a call at (202) 417-6640.

     

     

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  • Looking for Ways to Maximize Your Retirement Contributions?

    16 September 2016
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    Are you a sole proprietor with no full-time employees other than yourself and/or your spouse? Also, are you are seeking to maximize your retirement plan contributions? If so, a Solo 401(k) may be right for you. The key benefits of a Solo 401(k) plan are as follows:

    • Manage your own account directly without any brokers, banks, or trust companies as middlemen.
    • Generally contribute larger amounts, approximately equal to the 401(k) and profit-sharing amounts combined.
    • Legally avoid the unrelated business income tax (UBIT) that would apply to certain self-directed IRA transactions.
    • Make Roth contributions to the 401(k) element (not the profit-sharing part) of the plan, regardless of the AGI limitations that apply to regular Roth contributions.
    • Transfer existing retirement funds into the Solo 401(k).
    • Direct your investments with absolutely no restrictions on investment choices (including real estate, private companies, foreign assets, precious metals, etc.).

    Solo 401(k) Contributions – The maximum annual contribution to a Solo 401(k) for 2016 is $53,000 but not exceeding 100% of compensation. The Solo 401(k) contribution consists of two parts: (1) a profit-sharing contribution of up to 20% of net self-employment income for unincorporated businesses or 25% of W-2 income for incorporated businesses and (2) a salary-deferral contribution (same as the 401(k)) of as much as 100% of the first $18,000 ($24,000 if age 50 or over) of the remaining compensation after the profit-sharing contribution, as a tax-deductible contribution.

    Given sufficient income, a self-employed individual and spouse (assuming the spouse is employed in the same business) may contribute, for 2016, up to $106,000 combined. Because of the way the contribution is calculated, a larger contribution can usually be made into a Solo 401(k) than to a Keogh or SEP IRA at the same income level.

    Discretionary Funding –The funding of the Solo 401(k) plan is completely discretionary and flexible every year. Funding can be increased, decreased, or skipped entirely, if necessary.

    Where Deducted – If your business is organized as a Subchapter S or C corporation, or LLC electing to be taxed as a corporation, then you are an employee of the business, so the salary-deferral contribution reduces your personal W-2 earnings and the profit-sharing contribution is deducted as a business expense.

    For a sole proprietorship, a partnership, or an LLC taxed as a sole proprietorship, the owner’s salary-deferral and profit-sharing contributions are deductible only from personal income (i.e., on page 1 of Form 1040, as an adjustment to gross income), and not as an expense of the business.

    Deadlines – The deadline for establishing a Solo 401(k) is December 31st for an individual or the fiscal year end for corporations. For unincorporated businesses, the deadline for making the contributions is the regular April income tax filing due date plus extensions. For incorporated businesses, the deadline is 15 days after the close of the fiscal year.

    Roth Option – The 401(k) portion of the contribution can be designated as a non-deductible qualified Roth contribution, provided the plan document permits Roth contributions.

    If you think a Solo 401(k) might be right for you, please call Dagley & Co. at (202) 417-6640 for further details. We will help you to determine if your particular circumstances permit you have, and whether you will benefit from a Solo 401(k).

     

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  • Back-Door Roth IRAs

    6 May 2016
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    Though many individuals who are saving for retirement favor Roth IRAs over traditional IRAs, not everyone is allowed to make a Roth IRA contribution. Many favor Roth IRAs because it allows for both accumulation and post-retirement distributions to be tax-free. In comparison, contributions to traditional IRAs may be deductible, earnings are tax-deferred, and distributions are generally taxable. Anyone who is under age 70.5 and who has compensation can make a contribution to a traditional IRA (although the deduction may be limited).

    High-income taxpayers are limited in the annual amount they can contribute to a Roth IRA. The maximum contribution for 2016 is $5,500 ($6,500 if age 50 or older), but the allowable 2016 contribution for joint-filing taxpayers phases out at an adjustable gross income (AGI) between $184,000 and $194,000 (or an AGI between $0 and $9,999 for married taxpayers filing separately). For unmarried taxpayers, the phase-out is between $117,000 and $132,000.

    However, tax law also includes a provision that allows taxpayers to convert their traditional IRA funds to Roth IRAs without any AGI restrictions. Although deductible contributions to a traditional IRA have AGI restrictions (for those who are in an employer’s plan), nondeductible contributions do not.

    Thus, higher-income taxpayers can first make a nondeductible contribution to a traditional IRA and then convert that IRA to a Roth IRA. This is commonly referred to as a “back-door Roth IRA.”

    BIG PITFALL: However, there is a big pitfall to back-door IRAs, and it can produce unexpected taxable income. Taxpayers and their investment advisers often overlook this pitfall, which revolves around the following rule: For distribution purposes, all of a taxpayer’s IRAs (except Roth IRAs) are considered to be one account, so distributions are considered to be taken pro rata from both the deductible and nondeductible portions of the IRA. The prorated amount of the deducted contributions is taxable. Thus, a taxpayer who is contemplating a back-door Roth IRA contribution must carefully consider and plan for the consequences of this “one IRA” rule before making the conversion.

    There is a possible, although complicated, solution to this problem. Rolling over IRAs into other types of qualified retirement plans, such as employer retirement plans and 401(k) plans, is permitted tax-free. However, a rollover to a qualified plan is limited to the taxable portion of the IRA. If an employer’s plan permits, a taxpayer could roll the entire taxable portion of his or her IRA into the employer’s plan, leaving behind only nondeductible IRA contributions, which can then be converted into a Roth IRA tax-free.

    Before taking any action, please call Dagley & Co. to discuss strategies for making Roth IRA contributions or to convert existing traditional IRAs into Roth IRAs.

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  • Tax Filing Deadline Rapidly Approaching

    29 March 2016
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    Sit down and get to work. Tax day is just a few weeks away! For those of you who have not yet filed their 2015 tax return, tax day is the due date to either file your return and pay any taxes owed, or file for the automatic six-month extension and pay the tax you estimate to be due. Usually April 15 is the due date, but because Friday, April 15, is a legal holiday in the District of Columbia (where the IRS is headquartered), the filing date is advanced to the next day that isn’t a weekend or holiday – Monday, April 18 – even for taxpayers not living in DC.

    In addition, the April 18, 2016 deadline also applies to the following:

    Tax year 2015 balance-due payments – Taxpayers that are filing extensions are cautioned that the filing extension is an extension to file, NOT an extension to pay a balance due.  Late payment penalties and interest will be assessed on any balance due, even for returns on extension.  Taxpayers anticipating a balance due will need to estimate this amount and include their payment with the extension request.

    Tax year 2015 contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA – April 18 is the last day contributions for 2015 can be made to either a Roth or traditional IRA, even if an extension is filed.

    Individual estimated tax payments for the first quarter of 2016 – Taxpayers, especially those who have filed for an extension, are cautioned that the first installment of the 2016 estimated taxes are due on April 18.  If you are on extension and anticipate a refund, all or a portion of the refund can be allocated to this quarter’s payment on the final return when it is filed at a later date. If the refund won’t be enough to fully cover the first installment, you may need to make a payment with the April 18 voucher. Please call this office for any questions.

    Individual refund claims for tax year 2012 – The regular three-year statute of limitations expires on April 18 for the 2012 tax return.  Thus, no refund will be granted for a 2012 original or amended return that is filed after April 18. Caution: The statute does not apply to balances due for unfiled 2012 returns.

    Note: The deadline for any of the above actions is increased by an additional day, to April 19, 2016, for taxpayers who live in Maine or Massachusetts because of a holiday observed on the 18th in Massachusetts which affects the IRS Service Center located in Massachusetts that serves these two states.

    If this office is holding up the completion of your returns because of missing information, please forward that information as quickly as possible in order to meet the April 18 deadline.  Keep in mind that the last week of tax season is very hectic, and your returns may not be completed if you wait until the last minute.  If it is apparent that the information will not be available in time for the April 18 deadline, then let the office know right away so that an extension request, and 2016 estimated tax vouchers if needed, may be prepared.

    If your returns have not yet been completed, please call Dagley & Co. right away so that we can schedule an appointment and/or file an extension if necessary.

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  • Clock is Ticking for Retirement Plan Contributions

    25 March 2016
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    Were you aware that even after the close of the tax year you can make tax-deductible retirement savings contributions? Well, you can, and with the April tax deadline looming, the window of opportunity to maximize retirement and other special-purpose plan contributions for 2015 is closing. Many of those contributions not only build the retirement nest egg but also deliver tax deductions for the 2015 tax return. Let’s take a look at some of the ways a taxpayer can benefit.

    Traditional IRA – The maximum contribution to an IRA for 2015 is $5,500 ($6,500 if over 49 years old). The 2015 contribution can be made up until April 18th. If the taxpayer is covered by another retirement plan, some or all of the contribution may not be deductible. To be eligible to contribute to an IRA of any type, the taxpayer, or spouse if married filing jointly, must have earned income, such as wages or self-employment income.

    Roth IRA – This is a nondeductible retirement account, but the earnings are tax-free upon withdrawal, provided that the holding period and age requirements are met. Roth IRAs are a good alternative for many taxpayers who aren’t eligible to deduct contributions to a traditional IRA. The maximum deductible contribution for the 2015 tax year is $5,500 ($6,500 if the taxpayer is over 49 years old). The 2015 contribution can be made up until April 18th.

    Caution: The combined traditional IRA and Roth IRA contributions are limited to $5,500 ($6,500 if the taxpayer is over 49 years old).

    Spousal IRA – A non-working spouse can open and contribute to a traditional IRA or Roth IRA based upon the working spouse’s earned income, subject to the same contribution limits as the working spouse, but the combined contributions of both spouses cannot exceed the earned income of the working spouse. Contributions to spousal IRAs for 2015 must also be made by April 18th.

    SEP-IRA (Simplified Employee Pension) – SEP-IRAs are tax-deferred plans for sole proprietorships and small businesses. They are probably the easiest way to build retirement dollars, requiring virtually no paperwork. Maximum contributions depend on your net earnings from your business. For 2015, the maximum contribution is the lesser of 25 percent of compensation or $53,000. The 2015 contribution can be made up to the due date of the return, including extensions. Thus, unlike a traditional or Roth IRA, funding of a SEP-IRA for 2015 may occur up to October 17, 2016, when an extension has been granted.

    Solo 401(k) Plans – A growing number of self-employed individuals with no employees are forsaking the SEP-IRA for a newer type of retirement plan called the Solo 401(k), or Self-Employed 401(k), mostly for its higher contribution levels.

    For 2015, the maximum contribution to a Solo 401(k) is the sum of (A) up to 25% of compensation and (B) salary deferral up to $18,000. The total of A and B can’t exceed $53,000 or 100% of compensation. Note that a Solo 401(k) account must have been established by December 31, 2015, to make 2015 contributions, which can then be made up to the extended due date of the return (October 17, 2016, for most taxpayers). If a Solo 401(k) account was not established by the end of 2015, open one now for 2016 contributions.

    Health Savings Accounts (HSA) – An HSA is a tax-exempt trust or custodial account established exclusively for the purpose of paying qualified medical expenses of the account beneficiary. An HSA is designed to assist individuals who have high-deductible health plans (HDHP). A taxpayer is only eligible to establish an HSA if he or she has an HDHP. For 2015, this means that the plan must have a deductible amount of $1,300 or more for self-only coverage or $2,600 for family coverage. In addition, the annual maximum out-of-pocket costs for covered expenses can’t exceed $6,450 for a self-only plan or $12,900 for a family plan.

    The maximum 2015 contribution for eligible individuals with self-only coverage under an HDHP is $3,350, while an eligible individual with family coverage under an HDHP can contribute up to $6,650. The contribution limit is increased by $1,000 for an eligible individual who was age 55 or older at the end of 2015; however, no contribution can be made as of the month that an individual is enrolled in Medicare.

    Amounts contributed to an HSA belong to individuals and are completely portable. Every year, the money not spent on medical expenses stays in the account and gains interest tax-free, just like an IRA. Unused amounts remain available for later years (unlike amounts in Flexible Spending Arrangements that may be forfeited if not used by the end of the year). Contributions to an HSA for 2015 can be made through April 18, 2016.

    Coverdell Education Savings Account – These plans were originally called Education IRAs, but that moniker created confusion because they were really not retirement accounts. They are now called Coverdell Education Savings Accounts, named after the late Senator from Iowa. Contributions, which can be made for a beneficiary who is under 18 years of age, are not tax-deductible, but the money grows tax-free if the distributions are used to pay qualified education expenses. The maximum annual contribution is $2,000 per beneficiary, but this amount could be reduced partly or totally depending on income. Contributions do not count toward IRA annual contribution limits; they are also due by April 18, 2016, to be considered as having been made for 2015.

    Please note that information for each plan or account above has been abbreviated. Contact Dagley & Co. for specific details on how they may apply to your situation.

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