• Thinking of Tapping Your Retirement Savings? Read This First

    22 May 2017
    523 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    dag retirement

    Before you start tapping into your retirement savings, you may want to read this first:

    If you are under age 59½ and plan to withdraw money from a qualified retirement account, you will likely pay both income tax and a 10% early-distribution tax on any previously un-taxed money that you take out. Withdrawals you make from a SIMPLE IRA before age 59½ and those you make during the 2-year rollover restriction period after establishing the SIMPLE IRA may be subject to a 25% additional early-distribution tax instead of the normal 10%. The 2-year period is measured from the first day that contributions are deposited. These penalties are just what you’d pay on your federal return; your state may also charge an early-withdrawal penalty in addition to the regular state income tax.

    The following exceptions may help you avoid the penalty:

    • Withdrawals from any retirement plan to pay medical expenses—Amounts withdrawn to pay unreimbursed medical expenses are exempt from penalty if they would be deductible on Schedule A during the year and if they exceed 10% of your adjusted gross income. This is true even if you do not
    • IRA withdrawals annuitized over your lifetime—To qualify, the withdrawals must continue unchanged for a minimum of 5 years, including after you reach age 59½.
    • Employer retirement plan withdrawals—To qualify, you must be separated from service and be age 55 or older in that year (the lower limit is age 50 for qualified public-service employees such as police officers and firefighters) or elect to receive the money in substantially equal periodic payments after your separation from service.
    • Withdrawals from any retirement plan as a result of a disability—You are considered disabled if you can furnish proof that you cannot perform any substantial gainful activities because of a physical or mental condition. A physician must certify your condition.
    • IRA withdrawals by unemployed individuals to pay medical insurance premiums—The amount that is exempt from penalty cannot be more than the amount you paid during the year for medical insurance for yourself, your spouse, and your dependents. You also must have received unemployment compensation for at least 12 weeks during the year.
    • IRA withdrawals to pay higher education expenses—Withdrawals made during the year for qualified higher education expenses for yourself, your spouse, or your children or grandchildren are exempt from the early-withdrawal penalty.
    • IRA withdrawals to buy, build, or rebuild a first home—Generally, you are considered a first-time homebuyer for this exception if you had no present interest in a main home during the 2-year period leading up to the date the home was acquired, and the distribution must be used to buy, build, or rebuild that home. If you are married, your spouse must also meet this no-ownership requirement. This exception applies only to the first $10,000 of withdrawals used for this purpose. If married, you and your spouse can each withdraw up to $10,000 penalty-free from your respective IRA accounts.

    You should be aware that the information provided above is an overview of the penalty exceptions and that conditions other than those listed above may need to be met before qualifying for a particular exception. You are encouraged to contact this office before tapping your retirement funds for uses other than retirement. Distributions are most often subject to both normal taxes and other penalties, which can take a significant bite out of the distribution. However, with carefully planned distributions, both the taxes and the penalties can be minimized. Please call Dagley & Co. for assistance.

     

    Continue Reading
  • Big Tax Break for Adoptive Parents

    18 May 2017
    555 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    dag fam

    Planning to adopt a child or children? Or, are you already an adoptive parent? If so, we have good news for you! You may be able to qualify for an income-tax credit. This credit will be based on the amount of expenses you have incurred during the adoption period, which are directly related to the adoption of the following: 1. A child under the age of 18, or 2. a person who is physically or mentally incapable of self-care.

    This is a 1:1 credit for each dollar of qualified expenses up to a maximum for the year, which is $13,570 for 2017 (up from $13,460 in 2016). The credit is nonrefundable, which means it can only reduce tax liability to zero (as opposed to potentially resulting in a cash refund). But the good news is that any unused credit can be used for up to five years to reduce future tax liability.

    Qualified expenses generally include adoption fees, court costs, attorney fees and travel expenses that are reasonable, necessary and directly related to the adoption of the child, and may be for both domestic and foreign adoptions; however, expenses related to adopting a spouse’s child are not eligible for this credit. When adopting a child with special needs, the full credit is allowed whether or not any qualified expenses were incurred. A child with special needs is, among other requirements, a child who the state has determined (a) cannot or should not be returned to his or her parents’ home and (b) that the child won’t be adopted unless assistance is provided to the adoptive parents.

    The credit is phased out for higher-income taxpayers. For 2017, the AGI (computed without foreign-income exclusions) phase-out threshold is $203,540, and at the AGI of $243,540, the credit is completely phased out. Unlike most phase-outs, this one is the same regardless of filing status. However, the credit cannot be claimed by taxpayers using the filing status married filing separately.

    If your employer has an adoption-assistance program, up to $13,570 of reimbursements by the employer are excludable from income. Both the tax credit and the exclusion may be claimed, though not for the same expenses.

    If you think you qualify for this credit or are planning an adoption in the future, please contact Dagley & Co. for further credit details and to find out how this credit can apply to your particular circumstances.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Image via public domain

    Continue Reading
  • ACA Repeal & Replacement Bill Passes in House

    15 May 2017
    561 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    ahca

    On May 4th, the House of Representatives passed the proposed American Health Care Act (AHCA). This would repeal and replace several arrangements of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

    Exact details are not available, but, we have found some details from the original draft legislation published on March 6 to give you an idea of the how this will function (please keep in mind that some provisions were modified with respect to existing conditions in order to obtain enough Republican votes to pass the bill).

     

    GOP’s March Version of the AHCA

    The American Health Care Act would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In general, the GOP’s plan would continue the ACA’s premium tax credit through 2019 and then replace it in 2020 with a new credit for individuals without government insurance and for those who are not offered insurance by their employer. However, most of the ACA’s insurance mandates and penalties would be repealed retroactive to 2015. Other provisions will be overturned periodically through 2019.

    • Repeal of the Individual Mandate

    Background: Under the ACA, individuals are generally required to have ACA- compliant health insurance or face a “shared responsibility payment” (a penalty for not being insured). For 2016, the annual penalty was $695 per uninsured individual ($347.50 per child), with a maximum penalty of $2,085 per family.

    AHCA Legislation: Under the new legislation, this penalty would be repealed after 2015.

    • Repeal of the Employer Mandate

    Background: Under the ACA, large employers, generally those with 50 or more equivalent full-time employees, were subject to penalties that could reach thousands of dollars per employee for not offering their full-time employees affordable health insurance. These employers were also subject to some very complicated reporting requirements.

    AHCA Legislation: Under the new legislation, this penalty would be repealed after 2015.

    • Recapture and Repeal of the Premium Tax Credit

    Background: The premium tax credit (PTC) is a health insurance subsidy for lower-income individuals, and it is based on their household income for the year. Since the household income can only be estimated at the beginning of the year, the insurance subsidy, known as the advance premium tax credit (APTC), must also be estimated at the beginning of the year. Then, when the tax return for the year is prepared, the difference between the estimated amount of the subsidy (APTC) and the actual subsidy allowed (PTC) is determined based on the actual household income for the year. If the subsidy paid was less than what the individual was entitled to, the excess is credited to the individual’s tax return. If the subsidy paid was more than what the individual was entitled to, the difference is repaid on the tax return. However, for lower-income taxpayers there is a cap on the amount that needs to repaid, and this is also based on household income.

    AHCA Legislation: For tax years 2018 and 2019, the GOP legislation would require the repayment of the entire difference regardless of income. In addition, the PTC would be repealed after 2019.

    • Catastrophic Insurance

    Background: The current law does not allow the PTC to be used for the purchase of catastrophic health insurance.

    AHCA Legislation: The new legislation would allow premium tax credits to be used for the purchase of qualified “catastrophic-only” health plans and certain qualified plans not offered through an Exchange.

    • Refundable Tax Credit for Health Insurance

    Beginning in 2020, as a replacement for the current ACA insurance subsidies (PTC), the AHCA legislation would create a universal refundable tax credit for the purchase of state-approved major medical health insurance and unsubsidized COBRA coverage. Generally eligible individuals are those who do not have access to government health insurance programs or an offer of insurance from any employer.

    The credit is determined monthly and ranges from $2,000 a year for those under age 30 to $4,000 for those over 60. The credit is additive for a family and capped at $14,000. The credit phases out for individuals who make more than $75,000 and for couples who file jointly and make more than $150,000.

    • Health Savings Accounts

    Background: Individuals covered by high-deductible health plans can generally make tax-deductible contributions to a health savings account (HSA). Currently (2017), the maximum that can be contributed is $3,400 for self-only coverage and $6,750 for family coverage. Distributions from an HSA to pay qualified medical expenses are tax-free. However, nonqualified distributions are taxable and generally subject to a 20% penalty.

    AHCA Legislation: Beginning in 2018, the HSA contribution limit would be increased to at least $6,550 for those with self-only coverage and to $13,100 for those with family coverage. In addition, the new legislation would do the following:

    • Allow both spouses to make catch-up contributions (applies to those age55 through 64) beginning in 2018.
    • Allow medical expenses to be reimbursed if they were incurred 60 days prior to the establishment of the HSA (whereas currently, expenses qualify only if they are incurred after the HSA is established).
    • Lower the penalty for nonqualified distributions from the current 20% to 10% (the amount of the penalty prior to 2011).
    • Medical Deduction Income Limitation

    Background: As part of the ACA, the income threshold for itemizing and deducting medical expenses was increased from 7.5% to 10% of the taxpayer’s AGI.

    AHCA Legislation: Under the new legislation, the threshold would be returned to 7.5% beginning in 2018 (2017 for taxpayers age 65 or older).

    • Repeal of Net Investment Income Tax

    Background: The ACA imposed a 3.8% surtax on net investment income for higher-income taxpayers, generally single individuals with incomes above $200,000 ($250,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly).

    AHCA Legislation: The new legislation would repeal this tax after 2017.

    • Repeal on FSA Contribution Limits

    Background: Flexible spending accounts (FSAs) generally allow employees to designate pre-tax funds that can be deposited in the employer’s FSA, which the employee can then use to pay for medical and other qualified expenses. Effective beginning in 2013, annual contributions to health FSAs (also referred to as cafeteria plans) were limited to an inflation-adjusted $2,500. For 2017, the inflation limitation is $2,550.

    AHCA Legislation: The new legislation would remove the health FSA contribution limit, effective starting in 2017.

    • Repeal of Increased Medicare Tax

    Background: Beginning in 2013, the ACA imposed an additional Medicare Hospital Insurance (HI) surtax of 0.9% on individuals with wage or self-employed income in excess of $200,000 ($250,000 for married couples filing jointly).

    AHCA Legislation: The new legislation would repeal this surtax beginning in 2018.

    • Other Provisions
    • Preexisting Conditions – Prohibits health insurers from denying coverage or charging more for preexisting conditions. However, to discourage people from waiting to buy health insurance until they are sick, the legislation as introduced would require individuals to maintain “continuous” coverage. Those who go uninsured for longer than a set period will be subject to 30% higher premiums as a penalty.

    Children Under Age 26 – Allows children under age 26 to remain on their parents’ health plan until they are 26.

    • Small Business Health Insurance Tax Credit– Repealed after 2019
    • Medical Device Tax– Repealed after 2017
    • Tanning Tax– Repealed after 2018
    • Over-the-Counter Medication Tax– Repealed after 2017

     

    Questions? Contact Dagley & Co.

    Continue Reading
  • Want to Reduce Required Minimum Distributions and Extend Your Retirement Benefits?

    11 May 2017
    495 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    dag

    Do you find that your required minimum distributions (RMDs) from qualified plans and IRAs are providing unneeded income and a high tax bill? Or, are you afraid that the government’s RMD requirements will leave too little in your retirement plan for your later years? If you answered yes to either of these, good news! You can now use a qualified longevity annuity contract (QLAC) to reduce your RMDs and extend the life of your retirement distributions.

    The government allows individuals to purchase QLACs with their retirement funds, thus reducing the value of those funds (subject to the RMD rules) and in turn reducing the funds’ annual RMDs.

    A QLAC is a deferred-income annuity that begins at an advanced age and that meets the stringent limitations included in the tax regulations. One benefit of a retirement-planning strategy involving QLACs is that they provide a form of longevity insurance, allowing taxpayers to use part of their retirement savings to buy an annuity that helps protect them from outliving their assets.

    The tax-planning benefits of QLACs are twofold:

    • Because the QLAC is purchased using funds from a qualified retirement plan or IRA, that plan’s year-end balance (value) is lowered. This causes the RMDs for future years to be less than they otherwise would be, as the RMD is determined by dividing the account balance (from 12/31 of the prior year) by an annuity factor that is based on the retiree’s age.

    Example: Jack is age 74, and the annuity table lists his remaining distribution period as 23.8 years. The balance of his IRA account on 12/31/2016 is $400,000. Thus, his RMD for 2017 would be $16,807 ($400,000 / 23.8). However, if Jack had purchased a $100,000 QLAC with his IRA funds during 2016, his balance would have been $300,000, and his 2017 RMD would be $12,605 ($300,000 / 23.8). By purchasing the $100,000 QLAC, Jack would have reduced his RMD for 2016 by $4,202 ($16,807 – $12,605). This reduction would continue for all future years. Later, the $100,000 QLAC would provide retirement benefits, likely beginning when Jack reaches age 85.

    (2) Tax on the annuity will be deferred until payments commence under the annuity contract.

    A deferred-income annuity must meet a number of requirements to be treated as a QLAC, including the following:

    Limitation on premiumsWhen buying a QLAC, a taxpayer can use up to the lesser of $125,000 or 25% of his or her total non-Roth IRA balances. The dollar limitation applies to the sum of the premiums paid on all QLAC contracts.

    When distributions must commence Distributions under a QLAC must commence by a specified annuity starting date, which is no later than the first day of the month after the taxpayer’s 85th birthday.

    For additional details about how QLACs might fit into your retirement strategy, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Image via public domain

    Continue Reading
  • QuickBooks Tip: Receiving Customer Payments

    5 May 2017
    562 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    quickbooks

    We’ve put together step-by-step instructions of how to receive payments from a customer using your QuickBooks account:

    QuickBooks was designed to make your daily accounting tasks easier, faster, and more accurate. If you’ve been using the software for a while, you’ve probably found that to be true. Some chores, of course, aren’t so enjoyable. Like paying bills. Reconciling your bank account. Or anything else that has the potential to reduce the balance in your checking accounts.

    The process of receiving customer payments is one of your more enjoyable responsibilities. You supplied a product or service that someone liked and purchased, and you’re getting the money due you.

    Depending on the situation, you’ll use one of multiple methods to record customer payments. Here’s a look at some of your options.

    A Familiar Screen

    If you’re like many businesses, you send invoices to customers to let them know what they owe and when their payment is due. So one of the most commonly used ways to record payments is by using the Receive Payments window. To open it, click the Receive Payments icon on the home page or click Customers | Receive Payments.

    1

    You’ll use QuickBooks’ Receive Payments screen when you record a payment made in response to an invoice.

    The first thing you’ll do, of course, is choose the correct customer by clicking the down arrow in the field to the right of RECEIVED FROM. The outstanding balance from that customer will appear in the upper right corner, and invoice information will be displayed in the table below. Enter the PAYMENT AMOUNT and make sure the DATE is correct. (The next field, REFERENCE #, changes to CHECK # only if the CHECK option is selected.)

    Next, you’ll need to ensure that the payment is applied to the right invoices. If it covers the whole amount due, there will be a checkmark in every row in the first column of the table. If not, QuickBooks will use the money received to pay off the oldest invoices first. To change this, click Un-Apply Payment in the icon bar and click in front of the correct rows to create checkmarks.

    Several Options

    You’ll then want to tell QuickBooks what payment method the customer is using. Four options are displayed. The possibilities that are visible here are:

    • CASH
    • CHECK
    • CREDIT DEBIT (A specific card type may be shown here if you’ve indicated the customer’s preferred payment method in his or her record.)
    • e-CHECK

    If the desired payment method isn’t included in those four, click the down arrow under MORE. If it’s still not there, click Add New Payment Method. This window will open:

    2

    The New Payment Method window

    Click OK. When you choose your new payment method from the list, a window opens containing fields for the card number and expiration date. Click Done after you’ve entered it, and you’ll be returned to the Receive Payments screen. If you’re satisfied with your work there, click Save & Close or Save & New.

    Haven’t gotten set up to accept credit and debit cards yet? We can get you going with a merchant account to make this possible. You’re likely to find that some customers pay faster with this option. Your customers will be able to click a link in an emailed invoice and make their payments.

    Instant Sales

    Depending on the type of business you have and its physical location, there may be times when customers will come in and buy something on the spot. You’ll need to give them a Sales Receipt. Click Create Sales Receipts on the home page or open the Customers menu and select Enter Sales Receipts to open this window:

    3

    The Enter Sales Receipts window

    You’ll complete this form much like you entered data in the fields of the Receive Payments window. As you can see, you can print the mail for the customer and/or email it.

    After all the hard work you’ve done to make your sales, the last thing you want to do is record a payment incorrectly so it isn’t processed and you don’t get paid. Though QuickBooks makes the mechanics of receiving payments simple enough, you still should understand the entire process involved in getting income into the correct accounts. Dagley & Co. is available to help with this and any other areas of QuickBooks.

     

    Continue Reading
  • May 2017 Individual Due Dates

    28 April 2017
    563 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    may_dagley

    A new month is upon us. Dalgey & Co. has your two individual due dates from May 2017:

    May 10 – Report Tips to Employer 

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during April, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than May 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.
    May 31 –  Final Due Date for IRA Trustees to Issue Form 5498 

    Final due date for IRA trustees to issue Form 5498, providing IRA owners with the fair market value (FMV) of their IRA accounts as of December 31, 2016. The FMV of an IRA on the last day of the prior year (Dec 31, 2016) is used to determine the required minimum distribution (RMD) that must be taken from the IRA if you are age 70½ or older during 2017. If you are age 70½ or older during 2017 and need assistance determining your RMD for the year, please give this office a call. Otherwise, no other action is required and the Form 5498 can be filed away with your other tax documents for the year.

    Contact Dagley & Co. with any questions regarding May’s individual due dates.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Image via public domain

    Continue Reading
  • Deducting Convention Expenses

    26 April 2017
    494 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    dalgey business travel

    For the most part, an individual’s travel expenses from attending conventions or seminars can be deducted (provided that attendance benefits the taxpayer’s trade or business). But, the following travel expenses cannot be deducted: family members’ travel expenses, or expenses from attending investment, political, social or other types of meetings not related to the taxpayer’s trade or business. The entire cost of transportation and lodging, plus 50% of the meal expenses, is deductible for meetings held within the North American area. For a detailed list of areas within North America, please consult IRS Publication 463.

    Meetings Outside the North American Area – Deducting travel expenses for a convention or meeting outside the North American area has requirements:

    • The meeting must be directly related to the taxpayer’s trade or business (whereas meetings within the North American area need only benefit the taxpayer’s trade or business), and
    • It must be reasonable to hold the meeting outside the North American area. There is no specific definition of “reasonable” for this purpose, which places the burden of proof on the taxpayer. Considerations include the meeting’s purpose and activities and the location of the meeting sponsors’ homes.

    Even if the above requirements are met, the amount of deduction allowed depends upon the primary purpose of the trip and on the time spent on nonbusiness activities:

    (1) If the entire time is devoted to business, all ordinary and necessary travel expenses are deductible.

    (2) If the travel is primarily for vacation and only a few hours are spent attending professional seminars, none of the expenses incurred in traveling to and from the business location are deductible.

    (3) If, during a business trip, personal activities take place at, near or beyond the business destination, then the expenses incurred in traveling to and from the business location have to be appropriately allocated between the business and nonbusiness expenses.

    (4) If the travel is for a period of one week or less, or if less than 25% of the total time is spent on nonbusiness activities (on a day-by-day basis), then the travel deductions are treated the same as they would be for travel within the North American area.

    Meetings Held On Cruise Ships – When a convention or meeting is held on a cruise ship and is directly related to a taxpayer’s trade or business, the taxpayer is limited to $2,000 per year in deductions for expenses from attending such conventions, seminars, or similar meetings. All ships that sail are considered cruise ships. The following rules also apply:

    • The cruise ship must be registered in the United States.
    • All of the cruise ship’s ports of call must be in the United States or its possessions.

    If you have questions related to the deductibility of expenses from conventions and meetings or from foreign travel, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Image via public domain

     

     

    Continue Reading
  • Naming Your IRA Beneficiary

    24 April 2017
    511 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    Available Lease Signature Contract

    Designating a beneficiary of your traditional IRA is critically important and more complicated than you may realize. This decision will affect the minimum amounts that you must withdraw from the IRA when you reach age 70 ½, who will get what remains in the account after your death, and how that IRA balance can be paid out to beneficiaries.

    What’s more, a periodic review of whom you’ve named as IRA beneficiaries is vital to ensure that your overall estate planning objectives will be achieved in light of changes in the performance of your IRAs and in your personal, financial, and family situation. For example, if your spouse was named as your beneficiary when you first opened the account several years ago and you’ve subsequently divorced, your ex-spouse will remain the beneficiary of your IRA unless you notify your IRA custodian to change the beneficiary designation.

    The issue of naming a trust as the beneficiary of an IRA comes up regularly. There is no tax advantage to naming a trust as the IRA beneficiary. Of course, there may be a non-tax-related reason, such as controlling a beneficiary’s access to money; thus, naming a trust rather than an individual(s) as the beneficiary of an IRA could achieve that goal. However, that is not typically the case. Naming a trust as the beneficiary of an IRA eliminates the ability for multiple beneficiaries to maximize the opportunity to stretch the required minimum distributions (RMDs) over their individual life expectancies.

    Generally, trusts are drafted so that IRA RMDs will pass through the trust directly to the individual trust beneficiary and, therefore, be taxed at the beneficiary’s income tax rate. However, if the trust does not permit distribution to the beneficiary, then the RMDs will be taxed at the trust level, which has a tax rate of 39.6% on any taxable income in excess of $12,500 (2017 rate). This high tax rate applies at a much lower income level than for individuals.

    Distributions from traditional IRAs are always taxable whether they are paid to you or, upon your death, paid to your beneficiaries. Once you reach age 70 ½, you are required to begin taking distributions from your IRA. If your spouse is your beneficiary, he or she can delay distributions until he or she reaches age 70 ½ if your spouse is under the age of 70 ½ upon inheritance of your IRA. The rules are tougher for non-spousal beneficiaries, who generally must begin taking distributions based upon a complicated set of rules.

    Since IRA distributions are taxable to beneficiaries, beneficiaries usually wish to spread the taxation over a number of years. However, the tax code limits the number of years based on whether the decedent has begun his or her age 70 ½ RMDs at the time of his or her death.

    To ensure that your IRA will pass to your chosen beneficiary or beneficiaries, be certain that the beneficiary form on file with the custodian of your IRA reflects your current wishes. These forms allow you to designate both primary and alternate individual beneficiaries. If there is no beneficiary form on file, the custodian’s default policy will dictate whether the IRA will go first to a living person or to your estate.

    This is a simplified overview of the issues related to naming a beneficiary and the impact on post-death distributions. Uncle Sam wants the tax paid on the distributions, and the rules pertaining to how and when beneficiaries must take taxable distributions are very complicated.

    It should also be noted that some members of Congress have expressed their displeasure with stretch-out IRAs that have permitted some beneficiaries to extend for decades the payout period from the IRAs they inherited. These legislators would prefer that total distribution from inherited IRAs be made within five years after the IRA owner’s death. So it is possible that we will see tax law changes in this area.

    It may be appropriate to consult with Dagley & Co. regarding your particular circumstances before naming beneficiaries.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Image via public domain

     

     

     

     

    Continue Reading
  • 8 Financial Tips to Help Save Money While Building Your Startup

    20 April 2017
    352 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    dag startup

    Starting a new business or startup can be both an exciting and tough time. At Dagley & Co. we’ve compiled a list of eight tips you can use to save money while building your startup company:

    1. Be careful with perks.

    As a new business, you want to attract the best employees to your company. However, trying to offer the same perks as a venture capital can put you in debt quickly. Many successful businesses started in a garage, and there is no shame in keeping things simple at first. Once you’ve made it, you can start thinking about adding cappuccino machines, ping pong tables, and other perks to your office environment.

    1. Use free software programs.

    As you begin building your new business, resist the urge to invest in the latest, most expensive software programs. Instead, look for inexpensive software programs, or find programs that offer a lengthy free trial period. For example, instead of investing in Microsoft Office, you may consider using the free software programs offered by Google or Trello.

    1. Make the most of your credit cards.

    If you already have credit cards, make sure you are getting the most out of any perks they offer, such as frequent flyer miles or cash back. If you are planning to apply for a business credit card, research your options carefully, and choose the card that will give you the best benefits.

    1. Hire interns from local colleges.

    Instead of looking to the open market to find all of your employees, consider hiring interns from a local college instead. These individuals work for much less than a seasoned professional would, and they are often eager to prove themselves in the workplace.

    1. Barter for services.

    As you work to grow your business, you may need a variety of services from independent contractors or other companies. Instead of offering to pay cash for the services you receive, try to offer a different type of benefit that won’t impact your bottom line as much. For example, you may offer some of your own products or services, or you may allow the other party to collect a small amount of the profits you earn because of their services.

    1. Minimize your personal expenses.

    Because you will likely be investing a lot of your own money into your startup, you can increase profitability by reducing your personal expenses. Be careful about how you spend money, especially when you start bringing in revenue. Avoid making large purchases, such as a new house or car, unless they are absolutely necessary. Consider working with your accountant to keep track of all of your expenses so you can identify opportunities to cut back.

    1. Outsource some of your projects.

    To save more money while your business is getting off the ground, consider outsourcing some of your smaller projects, such as building or updating your website. Outsourcing one-time projects to independent contractors or consulting companies can be much more cost-effective than trying to hire a full-time employee to handle the job.

    1. Use LinkedIn for recruitment.

    Recruiting new employees can be expensive, especially if you are determined to find the best people. To cut down on these costs, consider using LinkedIn to recruit new people for your startup. Although you will have to do some of the legwork, you won’t spend as much as you would with other recruiting strategies.

    Regardless of the steps you take to save money as your business grows, you will still need to manage your funds carefully to ensure that your financial situation is improving over time. A professional accountant can help you set up a realistic budget and cash flow forecast to keep you on the right track. Contact Dagley & Co. today to learn more.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Image via public domain

     

    Continue Reading
  • Tax Implications of Crowdfunding

    17 April 2017
    407 Views
    Comments are off for this post
    Piggy Bank On Pennies

    When raising money through Internet crowdfunding sites such as GoFundMe, Kickstarter or Indiegogo, it is important to understand the “taxability” of the money raised. Whether the money raised is taxable depends upon the purpose of the fundraising campaign. For example, fees can range from 5 to 9% depending on the site.

    Gifts – When an entity raises funds for its own benefit and the contributions are made out of detached generosity (and not because of any moral or legal duty or the incentive of anticipated economic benefit), the contributions are considered tax-free gifts to the recipient.

    On the other hand, the contributor is subject to the gift tax rules if he or she contributes more than $14,000 to a particular fundraising effort that benefits one individual; the contributor is then liable to file a gift tax return. Unfortunately, regardless of the need, gifts to individuals are never tax deductible.

    The “gift tax trap” occurs when an individual establishes a crowdfunding account to help someone else in need (whom we’ll call the beneficiary) and takes possession of the funds before passing the money on to the beneficiary. Because the fundraiser takes possession of the funds, the contributions are treated as a tax-free gift to the fundraiser. However, when the fundraiser passes the money on to the beneficiary, the money then is treated as a gift from the fundraiser to the beneficiary; if the amount is over $14,000, the fundraiser is required to file a gift tax return and to reduce his or her lifetime gift and estate tax exemption. Some crowdfunding sites allow the fundraiser to designate a beneficiary so that the beneficiary has direct access to the funds.

    Charitable Gifts – Even if the funds are being raised for a qualified charity, the contributors cannot deduct the donations as charitable contributions without proper documentation. Taxpayers cannot deduct cash contributions, regardless of the amount, unless they can document the contributions in one of the following ways:

    • Contribution Less Than $250: To claim a deduction for a contribution of less than $250, the taxpayer must have a cancelled check, a bank or credit card statement, or a letter from the qualified organization; this proof must show the name of the organization, the date of the contribution, and the amount of the contribution.
    • Cash contributions of $250 or More – To claim a deduction for a contribution of $250 or more, the taxpayer must have a written acknowledgment of the contribution from the qualified organization; this acknowledgment must include the following details:
      • The amount of cash contributed;
      • Whether the qualified organization gave the taxpayer goods or services (other than certain token items and membership benefits) as a result of the contribution, along with a description and good-faith estimate of the value of those goods or services (other than intangible religious benefits); and
      • A statement that the only benefit received was an intangible religious benefit, if that was the case.

    Thus, if the contributor is to claim a charitable deduction for the cash donation, some means of providing the contributor with a receipt must be established.

    Business Ventures – When raising money for business projects, two issues must be contended with: the taxability of the money raised and the Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulations that come into play if the contributor is given an ownership interest in the venture.

    • No Business Interest Given – This applies when the fundraiser only provides nominal gifts, such as products from the business, coffee cups, or T-shirts; the money raised is taxable to the fundraiser.
    • Business Interest Provided – This applies when the fundraiser provides the contributor with partial business ownership in the form of stock or a partnership interest; the money raised is treated as a capital contribution and is not taxable to the fundraiser. (The amount contributed becomes the contributor’s tax basis in the investment.) When the fundraiser is selling business ownership, the resulting sales must comply with SEC regulations, which generally require any such offering to be registered with the SEC. However, the SEC regulations were modified in 2012 to carve out a special exemption for crowdfunding:
      • Fundraising Maximum – The maximum amount a business can raise without registering its offering with the SEC in a 12-month period is $1 million. Non-U.S. companies, businesses without a business plan, firms that report under the Exchange Act, certain investment companies, and companies that have failed to meet their reporting responsibilities may not participate.
    • Contributor Maximum – The amount an individual can invest through crowdfunding in any 12-month period is limited:
      • If the individual’s annual income or net worth is less than $100,000, his or her equity investment through crowdfunding is limited to the greater of $2,000 or 5% of the investor’s annual net worth.
      • If the individual’s annual income or net worth is at least $100,000, his or her investment via crowdfunding is limited to 10% of the investor’s net worth or annual income, whichever is less, up to an aggregate limit of $100,000.

    If you have questions about crowdfunding-related tax issues, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Image via public domain

    Continue Reading