• ACA Repeal & Replacement Bill Passes in House

    15 May 2017
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    On May 4th, the House of Representatives passed the proposed American Health Care Act (AHCA). This would repeal and replace several arrangements of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

    Exact details are not available, but, we have found some details from the original draft legislation published on March 6 to give you an idea of the how this will function (please keep in mind that some provisions were modified with respect to existing conditions in order to obtain enough Republican votes to pass the bill).

     

    GOP’s March Version of the AHCA

    The American Health Care Act would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In general, the GOP’s plan would continue the ACA’s premium tax credit through 2019 and then replace it in 2020 with a new credit for individuals without government insurance and for those who are not offered insurance by their employer. However, most of the ACA’s insurance mandates and penalties would be repealed retroactive to 2015. Other provisions will be overturned periodically through 2019.

    • Repeal of the Individual Mandate

    Background: Under the ACA, individuals are generally required to have ACA- compliant health insurance or face a “shared responsibility payment” (a penalty for not being insured). For 2016, the annual penalty was $695 per uninsured individual ($347.50 per child), with a maximum penalty of $2,085 per family.

    AHCA Legislation: Under the new legislation, this penalty would be repealed after 2015.

    • Repeal of the Employer Mandate

    Background: Under the ACA, large employers, generally those with 50 or more equivalent full-time employees, were subject to penalties that could reach thousands of dollars per employee for not offering their full-time employees affordable health insurance. These employers were also subject to some very complicated reporting requirements.

    AHCA Legislation: Under the new legislation, this penalty would be repealed after 2015.

    • Recapture and Repeal of the Premium Tax Credit

    Background: The premium tax credit (PTC) is a health insurance subsidy for lower-income individuals, and it is based on their household income for the year. Since the household income can only be estimated at the beginning of the year, the insurance subsidy, known as the advance premium tax credit (APTC), must also be estimated at the beginning of the year. Then, when the tax return for the year is prepared, the difference between the estimated amount of the subsidy (APTC) and the actual subsidy allowed (PTC) is determined based on the actual household income for the year. If the subsidy paid was less than what the individual was entitled to, the excess is credited to the individual’s tax return. If the subsidy paid was more than what the individual was entitled to, the difference is repaid on the tax return. However, for lower-income taxpayers there is a cap on the amount that needs to repaid, and this is also based on household income.

    AHCA Legislation: For tax years 2018 and 2019, the GOP legislation would require the repayment of the entire difference regardless of income. In addition, the PTC would be repealed after 2019.

    • Catastrophic Insurance

    Background: The current law does not allow the PTC to be used for the purchase of catastrophic health insurance.

    AHCA Legislation: The new legislation would allow premium tax credits to be used for the purchase of qualified “catastrophic-only” health plans and certain qualified plans not offered through an Exchange.

    • Refundable Tax Credit for Health Insurance

    Beginning in 2020, as a replacement for the current ACA insurance subsidies (PTC), the AHCA legislation would create a universal refundable tax credit for the purchase of state-approved major medical health insurance and unsubsidized COBRA coverage. Generally eligible individuals are those who do not have access to government health insurance programs or an offer of insurance from any employer.

    The credit is determined monthly and ranges from $2,000 a year for those under age 30 to $4,000 for those over 60. The credit is additive for a family and capped at $14,000. The credit phases out for individuals who make more than $75,000 and for couples who file jointly and make more than $150,000.

    • Health Savings Accounts

    Background: Individuals covered by high-deductible health plans can generally make tax-deductible contributions to a health savings account (HSA). Currently (2017), the maximum that can be contributed is $3,400 for self-only coverage and $6,750 for family coverage. Distributions from an HSA to pay qualified medical expenses are tax-free. However, nonqualified distributions are taxable and generally subject to a 20% penalty.

    AHCA Legislation: Beginning in 2018, the HSA contribution limit would be increased to at least $6,550 for those with self-only coverage and to $13,100 for those with family coverage. In addition, the new legislation would do the following:

    • Allow both spouses to make catch-up contributions (applies to those age55 through 64) beginning in 2018.
    • Allow medical expenses to be reimbursed if they were incurred 60 days prior to the establishment of the HSA (whereas currently, expenses qualify only if they are incurred after the HSA is established).
    • Lower the penalty for nonqualified distributions from the current 20% to 10% (the amount of the penalty prior to 2011).
    • Medical Deduction Income Limitation

    Background: As part of the ACA, the income threshold for itemizing and deducting medical expenses was increased from 7.5% to 10% of the taxpayer’s AGI.

    AHCA Legislation: Under the new legislation, the threshold would be returned to 7.5% beginning in 2018 (2017 for taxpayers age 65 or older).

    • Repeal of Net Investment Income Tax

    Background: The ACA imposed a 3.8% surtax on net investment income for higher-income taxpayers, generally single individuals with incomes above $200,000 ($250,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly).

    AHCA Legislation: The new legislation would repeal this tax after 2017.

    • Repeal on FSA Contribution Limits

    Background: Flexible spending accounts (FSAs) generally allow employees to designate pre-tax funds that can be deposited in the employer’s FSA, which the employee can then use to pay for medical and other qualified expenses. Effective beginning in 2013, annual contributions to health FSAs (also referred to as cafeteria plans) were limited to an inflation-adjusted $2,500. For 2017, the inflation limitation is $2,550.

    AHCA Legislation: The new legislation would remove the health FSA contribution limit, effective starting in 2017.

    • Repeal of Increased Medicare Tax

    Background: Beginning in 2013, the ACA imposed an additional Medicare Hospital Insurance (HI) surtax of 0.9% on individuals with wage or self-employed income in excess of $200,000 ($250,000 for married couples filing jointly).

    AHCA Legislation: The new legislation would repeal this surtax beginning in 2018.

    • Other Provisions
    • Preexisting Conditions – Prohibits health insurers from denying coverage or charging more for preexisting conditions. However, to discourage people from waiting to buy health insurance until they are sick, the legislation as introduced would require individuals to maintain “continuous” coverage. Those who go uninsured for longer than a set period will be subject to 30% higher premiums as a penalty.

    Children Under Age 26 – Allows children under age 26 to remain on their parents’ health plan until they are 26.

    • Small Business Health Insurance Tax Credit– Repealed after 2019
    • Medical Device Tax– Repealed after 2017
    • Tanning Tax– Repealed after 2018
    • Over-the-Counter Medication Tax– Repealed after 2017

     

    Questions? Contact Dagley & Co.

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  • May 2017 Business Due Dates

    1 May 2017
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    Happy May 1st! We’ve compiled your business due dates for this new month. Add these to your calendar NOW to stay on track!

    May 1 –  Federal Unemployment Tax 
    Deposit the tax owed through March if it is more than $500.

    May 1 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax
    File Form 941 for the first quarter of 2017. Deposit or pay any un-deposited tax under the accuracy of deposit rules. If your tax liability is less than $2,500, you can pay it in full with a timely filed return. If you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time, you have until May 10 to file the return.

    May 10 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax
    File Form 941 for the first quarter of 2017. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time.

    May 15 – Employer’s Monthly Deposit Due
    If you are an employer and the monthly deposit rules apply, May 15 is the due date for you to make your deposit of Social Security, Medicare and withheld income tax for April 2017. This is also the due date for the non-payroll withholding deposit for April 2017 if the monthly deposit rule applies.
    Contact Dagley & Co. with any questions regarding May’s due dates.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • May 2017 Individual Due Dates

    28 April 2017
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    A new month is upon us. Dalgey & Co. has your two individual due dates from May 2017:

    May 10 – Report Tips to Employer 

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during April, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than May 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.
    May 31 –  Final Due Date for IRA Trustees to Issue Form 5498 

    Final due date for IRA trustees to issue Form 5498, providing IRA owners with the fair market value (FMV) of their IRA accounts as of December 31, 2016. The FMV of an IRA on the last day of the prior year (Dec 31, 2016) is used to determine the required minimum distribution (RMD) that must be taken from the IRA if you are age 70½ or older during 2017. If you are age 70½ or older during 2017 and need assistance determining your RMD for the year, please give this office a call. Otherwise, no other action is required and the Form 5498 can be filed away with your other tax documents for the year.

    Contact Dagley & Co. with any questions regarding May’s individual due dates.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • April 2017 Business Due Dates

    3 April 2017
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    April is a busy month for business owners, accountants, accounting departments, CFOs and more. As Tax Day is quickly approaching, plan out your month in advance with these business due dates:

    April 18 – Household Employer Return Due

    If you paid cash wages of $2,000 or more in 2016 to a household employee, you must file Schedule H. If you are required to file a federal income tax return (Form 1040), file Schedule H with the return and report any household employment taxes. Report any federal unemployment (FUTA) tax on Schedule H if you paid total cash wages of $1,000 or more in any calendar quarter of 2015 or 2016 to household employees. Also, report any income tax that was withheld for your household employees. For more information, please call this office.

    April 18 – Corporations

    File a 2016 calendar year income tax return (Form 1120 or 1120-A) and pay any tax due. If you need an automatic 5-month extension of time to file the return, file Form 7004, Application for Automatic Extension of Time To File Certain Business Income Tax, Information and Other Returns, and deposit what you estimate you owe. Filing this extension protects you from late filing penalties but not late payment penalties, so it is important that you estimate your liability and deposit it using the instructions on Form 7004.

    April 18 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in March.

    April 18 – Corporations

    The first installment of 2017 estimated tax of a calendar year corporation is due.

    April 18 – Partnerships

    Last day file 2016 calendar year fiduciary return or file an extension.
    Contact Dagley & Co. with any questions, or if you’d like to schedule your last-minute tax refund meeting.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • GOP Unveils Its Obamacare Repeal and Replacement Legislation

    15 March 2017
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    Last week, on March 6th, the House Republicans unveiled their draft legislation that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This plan would ultimately continue the ACA’s premium tax credit through 2019 and then replace it in 2020. Then, a new credit for individuals without government insurance and those who are not offered insurance by their employer will be available.

    Additional details are provided below. Dagley & Co. wants you to keep in mind that the legislation is only a draft legislation and is subject to changes.

    Repeal of the Individual Mandate

    Background: Under the ACA, individuals are generally required to have ACA-compliant health insurance or face a “shared responsibility payment” (penalty for not being insured). For 2016, the annual penalty was $695 per uninsured individual ($347.50 per child), with a maximum penalty of $2,085 per family.

    GOP Legislation: Under the new legislation, this penalty would be repealed after 2015.

    Repeal of the Employer Mandate

    Background: Under the ACA, large employers, generally those with 50 or more equivalent full-time employees, were subject to penalties that could reach thousands of dollars per employee for not offering their full-time employees affordable health insurance. These employers were also subject to some very complicated reporting requirements.

    GOP Legislation: Under the new legislation, this penalty would be repealed after 2015.

    Recapture and Repeal of the Premium Tax Credit

    Background: The premium tax credit (PTC) is a health insurance subsidy for lower-income individuals, and it is based on their household income for the year. Since the household income can only be estimated at the beginning of the year, the insurance subsidy, known as the advance premium tax credit (APTC), must also be estimated at the beginning of the year. Then, when the tax return for the year is prepared, the difference between the estimated amount of the subsidy (APTC) and the actual subsidy allowed (PTC) is determined based on the actual household income for the year. If the subsidy paid was less than what the individual was entitled to, the excess is credited to the individual’s tax return. If the subsidy paid was more than what the individual was entitled to, the difference is repaid on the tax return. However, for lower-income taxpayers there is a cap on the amount that needs to repaid, and this is also based on household income.

    GOP Legislation: For tax years 2018 and 2019, the GOP legislation would require the repayment of the entire difference regardless of income. In addition, the PTC would be repealed after 2019.

    Catastrophic Insurance

    Background: The current law does not allow the PTC to be used for the purchase of catastrophic health insurance.

    GOP Legislation: The new legislation would allow premium tax credits to be used for the purchase of qualified “catastrophic-only” health plans and certain qualified plans not offered through an Exchange.

    Refundable Tax Credit for Health Insurance

    Beginning in 2020, as a replacement for the current ACA insurance subsidies (PTC), the GOP Legislation would create a universal refundable tax credit for the purchase of state-approved major medical health insurance and un-subsidized COBRA coverage. Generally eligible individuals are those who do not have access to government health insurance programs or an offer of insurance from any employer.

    The credit is determined monthly and ranges from $2,000 for those under age 30 to $4,000 for those over 60. The credit is additive for a family and capped at $14,000. The credit phases out for individuals who make more than $75,000 and for couples who file jointly and make more than $150,000.

    Health Savings Accounts

    Background: Individuals covered by high-deductible health plans can generally make tax-deductible contributions to a health savings account (HSA). Currently (2017), the maximum that can be contributed is $3,400 for self-only coverage and $6,750 for family coverage. Distributions from an HSA to pay qualified medical expenses are tax-free. However, non-qualified distributions are taxable and generally subject to a 20% penalty.

    GOP Legislation: Beginning in 2018, the HSA contribution limit would be increased to at least $6,550 for those with self-only coverage and to $13,100 for those with family coverage. In addition, the new legislation would do the following:

    • Allow both spouses to make catch-up contributions (applies to those age 55 through 64) beginning in 2018.
    • Allow medical expenses to be reimbursed if they were incurred 60 days prior to the establishment of the HSA (whereas currently only expenses incurred after the HSA is established qualify).
    • Lower the penalty for non-qualified distributions from the current 20% to 10% (the amount of the penalty prior to 2011).

    Medical Deduction Income Limitation

    Background: As part of the ACA, the income threshold for itemizing and deducting medical expenses was increased from 7.5% to 10% of the taxpayer’s AGI.

    GOP Legislation: Under the new legislation, the threshold would be returned to 7.5% beginning in 2018 (2017 for taxpayers age 65 or older).

    Repeal of Net Investment Income Tax

    Background: The ACA imposed a 3.8% surtax on net investment income for higher-income taxpayers, generally single individuals with incomes above $200,000 and $250,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly.

    GOP Legislation: The new legislation would repeal this tax after 2017.

    Repeal on FSA Contribution Limits

    Background: Flexible spending accounts (FSAs) generally allow employees to designate pre-tax funds that can be deposited in the employer’s FSA, which the employee can then use to pay for medical and other qualified expenses. Effective beginning in 2013, annual contributions to health FSAs (also referred to as cafeteria plans) were limited to an inflation-adjusted $2,500. For 2017, the inflation limitation is $2,550.

    GOP Legislation: The new legislation would remove the health FSA contribution limit, effective starting in 2017.

    Repeal of Increased Medicare Tax

    Background: Beginning in 2013, the ACA imposed an additional Medicare Hospital Insurance (HI) surtax of 0.9% on individuals with wage or self-employed income in excess of $200,000 or $250,000 for married couples filing jointly.

    GOP Legislation: The new legislation would repeal this surtax beginning in 2018.

    Other Provisions

    • Preexisting Conditions – Prohibits health insurers from denying coverage or charging more for preexisting conditions. However, to discourage people from waiting to buy health insurance until they are sick, individuals will need to maintain “continuous” coverage. Those who go uninsured for longer than a set period will be subject to 30% higher premiums as a penalty.
    • Children Under Age 26 – Allows children under age 26 to remain on their parents’ health plan until they are 26.
    • Small Business Health Insurance Tax Credit – Repealed after 2019
    • Medical Device Tax – Repealed after 2017
    • Tanning Tax – Repealed after 2018
    • Over-the-Counter Medication Tax – Repealed after 2017

    This is a proposed law change, and it may not ultimately turn out as described here. If you have any questions, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • December 2016 Individual Due Dates

    1 December 2016
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    Happy Decemeber! The busiest and most wonderful time of year has finally begun. With this, means your end of year planning must start ASAP. Before you get overwhelmed, plan out your Decemeber month calander TODAY. We’ve provided some indiviudal dute dates to make it a smoother process. As always, contact Dagley & Co. with any year-end questions regarding tax, business, or individual planning.

    December 1 – Time for Year-End Tax Planning

    December is the month to take final actions that can affect your tax result for 2016. Taxpayers with substantial increases or decreases in income, changes in marital status or dependent status, and those who sold property during 2016 should call for a tax planning consultation appointment.

    December 12 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during November, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than December 12. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    December 31 – Last Day to Make Mandatory IRA Withdrawals

    Last day to withdraw funds from a Traditional IRA Account and avoid a penalty if you turned age 70½ before 2016. If the institution holding your IRA will not be open on December 31, you will need to arrange for withdrawal before that date.

    December 31 – Last Day to Pay Deductible Expenses for 2016

    Last day to pay deductible expenses for the 2016 return (doesn’t apply to IRA, SEP or Keogh contributions, all of which can be made after December 31, 2016). Taxpayers who are making state estimated payments may find it advantageous to prepay the January state estimated tax payment in December (Please call the office for more information).

    December 31 –  Last Day of the Year

    If the actions you wish to take cannot be completed on the 31st or a single day, you should consider taking action earlier than December 31st.

     

     

     

     

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  • November 2016 Individual Due Dates

    28 October 2016
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    November 10 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during October, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than November 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    November 2016 Business Due Dates

    November 10 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    File Form 941 for the third quarter of 2016. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time.

    November 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in October.

    November 15 – Non-Payroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in October.

     

     

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  • Employer Offered You Health Insurance but You Got Yours through the Marketplace. You May Be in for an Unpleasant Surprise!

    5 July 2016
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    The premium tax credit (PTC) is one of the key provisions of Obamacare. It serves as a subsidy for the cost of health insurance for lower-income individuals and families. Although the credit is determined at the end of the year based upon income, taxpayers are allowed to estimate their income and receive the credit in advance, thereby reducing their premium costs.

    Another key provision of Obamacare requires large employers to offer full-time employees affordable healthcare insurance. The term “affordable” means that the employee’s insurance costs less than 9.66% (2016 percentage) of the employee’s household income. In addition, because the government wants to limit its outlay for the PTC, the law denies PTC to employees who are offered affordable healthcare insurance by their employer.

    This is where a potential problem arises! Quite often, the cost of insurance subsidized by the advance PTC obtained through the Marketplace is substantially less costly than the “affordable” insurance offered by the employer; as a result, the employee will instead obtain the less expensive insurance through the Marketplace, while not realizing that they are not entitled to the PTC because the employer offered them “affordable” insurance.

    Prior to 2015, the government had no way of determining who was offered “affordable” insurance by their employer and therefore was unable to enforce the “no PTC rule.” However, beginning in 2015, employers with 100 or more equivalent full-time employees were required to file the new Form 1095-C, which shows month-by-month when an employee was offered “affordable” healthcare insurance. Generally, the employer is required to furnish a copy of Form 1095-C (or a substitute form) to the employee. Beginning in 2016, even employers with 50 or more equivalent full-time employees are required to file 1095-Cs.

    The IRS will begin matching the information on the 1095-Cs that the employers have filed with taxpayers who claimed the PTC for months during which they were also offered “affordable” insurance by their employer. Those taxpayers will be receiving notices from the IRS requiring them to repay the premium tax credit for the months when they were offered affordable care.

    If you are concerned that you claimed the PTC and might be subject to repayment, you can look at your copy of Form 1095-C from your employer. Check line 14 and see if there are entries in any of the months. The entries will be codes, which are explained on the reverse of the form.

    If you need assistance or additional information related to Form 1095-C and its impact on the PTC, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

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  • Due Dates June 2016 – Individual and Business

    29 May 2016
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    June 2016 Individual Due Dates

    June 10 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during May, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than June 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    June 15 – Estimated Tax Payment Due

    It’s time to make your second quarter estimated tax installment payment for the 2016 tax year. Our tax system is a “pay-as-you-go” system. To facilitate that concept, the government has provided several means of assisting taxpayers in meeting the “pay-as-you-go” requirement. These include: payroll withholding for employees; pension withholding for retirees; and estimated tax payments for self-employed individuals and those with other sources of income not covered by withholding.

    When a taxpayer fails to prepay a safe harbor (minimum) amount, they can be subject to the underpayment penalty. This penalty is equal to the federal short-term rate plus 3 percentage points, and the penalty is computed on a quarter-by-quarter basis.

    Federal tax law does provide ways to avoid the underpayment penalty. If the underpayment is less than $1,000 (the “de minimis amount”), no penalty is assessed. In addition, the law provides “safe harbor” prepayments. There are two safe harbors:  The first safe harbor is based on the tax owed in the current year. If your payments equal or exceed 90% of what is owed in the current year, you can escape a penalty. The second safe harbor is based on the tax owed in the immediately preceding tax year. This safe harbor is generally 100% of the prior year’s tax liability. However, for taxpayers whose AGI exceeds $150,000 ($75,000 for married taxpayers filing separately), the prior year’s safe harbor is 110%.

    Example: Suppose your tax for the year is $10,000 and your prepayments total $5,600. The result is that you owe an additional $4,400 on your tax return. To find out if you owe a penalty, see if you meet the first safe harbor exception. Since 90% of $10,000 is $9,000, your prepayments fell short of the mark. You can’t avoid the penalty under this exception.

    However, in the above example, the safe harbor may still apply. Assume your prior year’s tax was $5,000. Since you prepaid $5,600, which is greater than 110% of the prior year’s tax (110% = $5,500), you qualify for this safe harbor and can escape the penalty.

    This example underscores the importance of making sure your prepayments are adequate, especially if you have a large increase in income. This is common when there is a large gain from the sale of stocks, sale of property, when large bonuses are paid, when a taxpayer retires, etc. Timely payment of each required estimated tax installment is also a requirement to meet the safe harbor exception to the penalty. If you have questions regarding your safe harbor estimates, please call this office as soon as possible.

    CAUTION: Some state de minimis amounts and safe harbor estimate rules are different than those for the Federal estimates. Please call Dagley & Co. for particular state safe harbor rules.

    June 15 – Taxpayers Living Abroad

    If you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien living and working (or on military duty) outside the United States and Puerto Rico, June 15 is the filing due date for your 2015 income tax return and to pay any tax due. If your return has not been completed and you need additional time to file your return, file Form 4868 to obtain 4 additional months to file. Then, file Form 1040 by October 17. However, if you are a participant in a combat zone, you may be able to further extend the filing deadline (see below).

    Caution: This is not an extension of time to pay your tax liability, only an extension to file the return. If you expect to owe, estimate how much and include your payment with the extension. If you owe taxes when you do file your extended tax return, you will be liable for both the late payment penalty and interest from the due date.

    Combat Zone – For military taxpayers in a combat zone/qualified hazardous duty area, the deadlines for taking actions with the IRS are extended. This also applies to service members involved in contingency operations, such as Operation Iraqi Freedom or Enduring Freedom. The extension is for 180 consecutive days after the later of: The last day a military taxpayer was in a combat zone/qualified hazardous duty area or served in a qualifying contingency operation, or have qualifying service outside of the combat zone/qualified hazardous duty area (or the last day the area qualifies as a combat zone or qualified hazardous duty area), or the last day of any continuous qualified hospitalization for injury from service in the combat zone/qualified hazardous duty area or contingency operation, or while performing qualifying service outside of the combat zone/qualified hazardous duty area.

    In addition to the 180 days, the deadline is also extended by the number of days that were left for the individual to take an action with the IRS when they entered a combat zone/qualified hazardous duty area or began serving in a contingency operation.

    It is not a good idea to delay filing your return because you owe taxes. The late filing penalty is 5% per month (maximum 25%) and can be a substantial penalty. It is generally better practice to file the return without payment and avoid the late filing penalty. We can also establish an installment agreement which allows you to pay your taxes over a period of up to 72 months.

    Please contact Dagley & Co. for assistance with an extension request or an installment agreement.

    June 30 – Taxpayers with Foreign Financial Interests

    A U.S. citizen or resident, or a person doing business in the United States, who has a financial interest in or signature or other authority over any foreign financial accounts (bank, securities or other types of financial accounts), in a foreign country, is required to file Form FinCEN 114 with the Department of the Treasury (not the IRS). The form must be filed with the Treasury Department no later than June 30, 2016 for 2015. No extension of time to file is permitted. The form must be filed electronically; paper forms are not allowed. This filing requirement applies only if the aggregate value of these financial accounts exceeds $10,000 at any time during 2015. Contact Dagley & Co. for additional information and assistance filing the form.

    June 2016 Business Due Dates

    June 15 – Employer’s Monthly Deposit Due

    If you are an employer and the monthly deposit rules apply, June 15 is the due date for you to make your deposit of Social Security, Medicare and withheld income tax for May 2016. This is also the due date for the non-payroll withholding deposit for May 2016 if the monthly deposit rule applies.

    June 15 – Corporations

    Deposit the second installment of estimated income tax for 2016 for calendar year corporations.

    June 30 – Taxpayers with Foreign Financial Interests

    A U.S. citizen or resident, or a person doing business in the United States, who has a financial interest in or signature or other authority over any foreign financial accounts (bank, securities or other types of financial accounts), in a foreign country, is required to file Form FinCEN 114 with the Department of the Treasury (not the IRS). The form must be filed with the Treasury Department no later than June 30, 2016 for 2015. No extension of time to file is permitted. The form must be filed electronically; paper forms are not allowed. This filing requirement applies only if the aggregate value of these financial accounts exceeds $10,000 at any time during 2015. Contact Dagley & Co. for additional information and assistance filing the form.

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  • Receiving Cash Tips? The IRS Is Watching

    13 May 2016
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    If you collect tips, you must include them in your taxable income. This requirement is not limited to waiters and waitresses; it applies to anyone who collects tips, including taxicab drivers, beauticians, porters, concierges, etc.

    Tips are amounts freely given by a customer to a person providing a service. They are generally given as cash, but they include tips made on a credit or debit card or as part of a tip-sharing arrangement. Tips can also be in the form of non-traditional gifts such as tickets to events, wine and other items of value. If you receive $20 or more in tips in any month, you should report all of your tips to your employer, with these exceptions:

    Tip-splitting Tips you give to others under a tip-splitting arrangement are not subject to the reporting requirement by you (the employee initially receiving them). You should report to your employer only the net tips you received.

    Service (cover) charges — These are charges arbitrarily added by the business establishment (employer) — for example, a specific percentage of the bill for parties exceeding X in number — and are excluded from the tip-reporting requirements. If your employer collects service charges from customers, your share of these charges, as determined by your employer, is taxable to you and should already be included as part of your wages.

    Keep a running daily log of tip income Tips are a frequently audited item, and it is a good practice to keep a daily log of your tips. The IRS provides a log in Publication 1244 that includes an Employee’s Daily Record of Tips and a Report to Employer for recording your tip income.

    Report tips to your employer If you receive $20 or more in tips in any month, you should report all of your tips to your employer. Your employer is required to withhold federal income, Social Security, and Medicare taxes. If the tips received are less than $20 in any month, don’t think you are off the hook; although they need not be reported to the employer, these tips are still taxable and must be reported on your tax return, as they are subject to income, Medicare and Social Security taxes.

    Employer allocation of tips If you work for a large restaurant, you may find when you get your W-2 form that you got tips you didn’t know about. Restaurants with a large serving staff report a total called “allocated tips” to the IRS. Here is what allocated tips are all about:

    Tip allocation applies to “large food and beverage establishments” (i.e., food service businesses where tipping is customary and that have 10 or more employees). These establishments must allocate a portion of their gross receipts as tip income to those employees who “underreport,” which happens if an employee reports tips that are less than 8% of the employee’s share of the employer’s gross sales. The employer must allocate to those underreported employees the difference between what the employee reported and the 8% amount.

    If this situation applies to you, the allocation amount will be noted in a separate box on your W-2, and these allocated tips won’t be included in the total wages shown on your W-2 form. You will need to report the allocated tip amount as additional income on your tax return unless you have adequate records to show that the amount is incorrect. The IRS frequently issues inquiries where the taxpayer’s W-2 shows an allocation of tips and a lesser amount is reported on the tax return.

    Self-Employed Individuals – If you are self-employed, you don’t have an employer to report tips to, and you simply include the tips you’ve received in your self-employed income on your tax return for the year you received the tips.

    Because they are usually paid in cash, tips are a frequent audit item. If you are receiving tips and have any questions, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

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