• 8 Financial Tips to Help Save Money While Building Your Startup

    20 April 2017
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    Starting a new business or startup can be both an exciting and tough time. At Dagley & Co. we’ve compiled a list of eight tips you can use to save money while building your startup company:

    1. Be careful with perks.

    As a new business, you want to attract the best employees to your company. However, trying to offer the same perks as a venture capital can put you in debt quickly. Many successful businesses started in a garage, and there is no shame in keeping things simple at first. Once you’ve made it, you can start thinking about adding cappuccino machines, ping pong tables, and other perks to your office environment.

    1. Use free software programs.

    As you begin building your new business, resist the urge to invest in the latest, most expensive software programs. Instead, look for inexpensive software programs, or find programs that offer a lengthy free trial period. For example, instead of investing in Microsoft Office, you may consider using the free software programs offered by Google or Trello.

    1. Make the most of your credit cards.

    If you already have credit cards, make sure you are getting the most out of any perks they offer, such as frequent flyer miles or cash back. If you are planning to apply for a business credit card, research your options carefully, and choose the card that will give you the best benefits.

    1. Hire interns from local colleges.

    Instead of looking to the open market to find all of your employees, consider hiring interns from a local college instead. These individuals work for much less than a seasoned professional would, and they are often eager to prove themselves in the workplace.

    1. Barter for services.

    As you work to grow your business, you may need a variety of services from independent contractors or other companies. Instead of offering to pay cash for the services you receive, try to offer a different type of benefit that won’t impact your bottom line as much. For example, you may offer some of your own products or services, or you may allow the other party to collect a small amount of the profits you earn because of their services.

    1. Minimize your personal expenses.

    Because you will likely be investing a lot of your own money into your startup, you can increase profitability by reducing your personal expenses. Be careful about how you spend money, especially when you start bringing in revenue. Avoid making large purchases, such as a new house or car, unless they are absolutely necessary. Consider working with your accountant to keep track of all of your expenses so you can identify opportunities to cut back.

    1. Outsource some of your projects.

    To save more money while your business is getting off the ground, consider outsourcing some of your smaller projects, such as building or updating your website. Outsourcing one-time projects to independent contractors or consulting companies can be much more cost-effective than trying to hire a full-time employee to handle the job.

    1. Use LinkedIn for recruitment.

    Recruiting new employees can be expensive, especially if you are determined to find the best people. To cut down on these costs, consider using LinkedIn to recruit new people for your startup. Although you will have to do some of the legwork, you won’t spend as much as you would with other recruiting strategies.

    Regardless of the steps you take to save money as your business grows, you will still need to manage your funds carefully to ensure that your financial situation is improving over time. A professional accountant can help you set up a realistic budget and cash flow forecast to keep you on the right track. Contact Dagley & Co. today to learn more.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • April 2017 Business Due Dates

    3 April 2017
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    April is a busy month for business owners, accountants, accounting departments, CFOs and more. As Tax Day is quickly approaching, plan out your month in advance with these business due dates:

    April 18 – Household Employer Return Due

    If you paid cash wages of $2,000 or more in 2016 to a household employee, you must file Schedule H. If you are required to file a federal income tax return (Form 1040), file Schedule H with the return and report any household employment taxes. Report any federal unemployment (FUTA) tax on Schedule H if you paid total cash wages of $1,000 or more in any calendar quarter of 2015 or 2016 to household employees. Also, report any income tax that was withheld for your household employees. For more information, please call this office.

    April 18 – Corporations

    File a 2016 calendar year income tax return (Form 1120 or 1120-A) and pay any tax due. If you need an automatic 5-month extension of time to file the return, file Form 7004, Application for Automatic Extension of Time To File Certain Business Income Tax, Information and Other Returns, and deposit what you estimate you owe. Filing this extension protects you from late filing penalties but not late payment penalties, so it is important that you estimate your liability and deposit it using the instructions on Form 7004.

    April 18 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in March.

    April 18 – Corporations

    The first installment of 2017 estimated tax of a calendar year corporation is due.

    April 18 – Partnerships

    Last day file 2016 calendar year fiduciary return or file an extension.
    Contact Dagley & Co. with any questions, or if you’d like to schedule your last-minute tax refund meeting.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • 10 Insane (But True) Ways to Grow Small Business Profits

    27 November 2016
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    Run your own business but things aren’t working out the way you pictured? Thankfully, many proven methods exist to help small businesses increase revenues, cut costs and improve overall. If you’re ready to take your company to a new level of success, consider implementing one or more of the following Dagley & Co. insane (but true) ways to grow small business profits:

    Eliminate Low-Margin Clients, Products or Services

    To boost your small business profits, ask yourself the following questions:

    What clients, products or services generate the most money and offer the greatest growth potential right now?

    What clients, products or services generate the least profit and provide the least growth potential currently?

    After analyzing your findings, eliminate low-margin clients, products and services. With the saved time and money, focus on the higher-producing areas of your business. Purging clients, products or services from your company might be painful at first. However, this practice will likely slash stress and pay dividends in the long run.

    Embrace Technology

    Embrace technology, automate and go paperless. Besides helping the environment, you’ll probably save a ton of money. In addition to cutting costs on paper, you’ll also spend less money on printer maintenance and toner as well as file cabinets and binders.

    Increase Conversion Rates Through A/B Testing

    Regardless of what type of small business you have, turning more shoppers into buyers will improve your bottom line. To increase conversion rates, consider implementing A/B testing. Also referred to as split testing, A/B testing utilizes two distinct sales pages in order to ascertain which page converts more effectively. Depending on the nature of your business, converting might equate to a customer buying a product or a client purchasing a service.

    Experiment With Pricing

    Raising prices while adding value can perhaps be the simplest way to improve small business profits. However, you risk losing bargain-oriented customers. Fortunately, for many people, price isn’t the most important factor when purchasing products and services. Lowering prices with the express intent of selling more products or services can also be a winning strategy.

    Increase Average Lifetime Value of Each Client

    Repeat customers can help your small business survive during stagnant economic times. Besides searching for effective ways to attract new customers, focus on increasing the average lifetime value of each client. You can accomplish this important task by:

    • Offering loyal customers a product or service upgrade
    • Providing customers with something your competitors don’t offer them
    • Being more convenient than your competitors
    • Looking for ways to solve problems for your customers
    • Providing stellar customer service
    • Reduce Churn Rates

    Churn refers to when a client ends his or her relationship with a business. A high churn rate will negatively impact your ability to grow your small business profits. To reduce churn rates:

    • Establish customer expectations and strive to meet or exceed them
    • Make your first impression a great one
    • Listen to your clientele
    • Closely monitor external environment changes
    • Speed Up Product or Service Delivery

    Speeding up the delivery of your products and services is another ingenious way to improve profits. Fast deliveries make customers happy and encourage repeat business. Decreasing the amount of time projects sit in limbo will also save money.

    Bundle Products or Services

    Do you offer products or services that naturally fit together? Providing customers with product or service bundles is a great way to increase both your revenues and your bottom line. For example, an accounting firm might bundle bookkeeping, tax preparation and consulting services.

    Expand to a New Geographic Market

    If you’ve saturated your current geographic market, consider expanding to a new one. Obviously, the costs of such an undertaking must be analyzed. But the long-term benefits of tapping into new geographic markets might make the venture worthwhile.

    Provide Maintenance Contracts

    Do you want to generate a steady income stream for an extended period of time? Think about charging customers an ongoing fee in exchange for maintenance contracts. You can even offer discounts to customers who sign longer contractual agreements. When developing maintenance contacts, clearly list the products or services customers can expect to receive.

    Growing small business profits may seem impossible to most. Dealing with saturated markets and a sluggish economy can dampen your overall outlook. Struggling to improve the bottom line of your small business? consider adhering to one or more of these strategies above by Dagley & Co., or give us a call at 202-417-6640 for guidance.

     

     

     

     

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  • Hire Contractors in 2015? The Deadline for 1099s Is February 1, 2016

    12 January 2016
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    If you operate a business and hired an individual (like an independent contractor) who is not an “employee” and you paid him or her $600 or more for the 2015 calendar year, you are required to issue him or her a Form 1099 at the end of the year to avoid penalties and the prospect of losing the deduction for his or her labor and expenses in an audit – or at the very latest, February 1, 2016.

    That is, the due date for mailing the recipient his or her copy of the 1099 that reports 2015 payments is February 1, 2016, while the copy that goes to the IRS is due at the end of February.

    It is not uncommon to have a repairman out early in the year, pay him less than $600, then use his services again later in the year and have the total for the year exceed the $599 limit. As a result, you may have overlooked getting the information from the individual needed to file the 1099s for the year. Therefore, it is good practice to always have individuals who are not incorporated complete and sign an IRS Form W-9 the first time you engage them and before you pay them. Having a properly completed and signed Form W-9 for all independent contractors and service providers eliminates any oversights and protects you against IRS penalties and conflicts. If you have been negligent in the past about having the W-9s completed, it would be a good idea to establish a procedure for getting each non-corporate independent contractor and service provider to fill out a W-9 and return it to you going forward.

    IRS Form W-9, Request for Taxpayer Identification Number and Certification, is provided by the government as a means for you to obtain the data required to file 1099s for your vendors. It also provides you with verification that you complied with the law in case the vendor gave you incorrect information. We highly recommend that you have a potential vendor complete a Form W-9 prior to engaging in business with them. The W-9 is for your use only and is not submitted to the IRS.

    The penalties for failure to file the required informational returns have been doubled this year and are $250 per informational return. The penalty is reduced to $50 if a correct but late information return is filed not later than the 30th day after the February 29, 2016, required filing date, or it is reduced to $100 for returns filed after the 30th day but no later than August 1, 2016. If you are required to file 250 or more information returns, you must file them electronically.

    In order to avoid a penalty, copies of the 1099s you’ve issued for 2015 need to be sent to the IRS by February 29, 2016. They must be submitted on magnetic media or on optically scannable forms (OCR forms). This firm prepares 1099s for submission to the IRS. This service provides recipient copies and file copies for your records. Use the 1099 worksheet (http://images.client-sites.com/1099-Worksheet.pdf) to provide Dagley & Co. with the information needed to prepare your 1099s.

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  • January 2016 Tax Due Dates for Businesses

    7 January 2016
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    Yesterday, we covered the January 2016 tax due dates for individuals.

    There is only one deadline for business owners to remember: on January 15, your Employer’s Monthly Deposit is due. If you are an employer and the monthly deposit rules apply, January 15 is the due date for you to make your deposit of Social Security, Medicare and withheld income tax for December 2015. This is also the due date for the nonpayroll withholding deposit for December 2015 if the monthly deposit rule applies. Employment tax deposits must be made electronically (no more paper coupons), except employers with a deposit liability under $2,500 for a return period may remit payments quarterly or annually with the return.

    If you are a small- or medium-sized business owner, and you don’t have a CPA lined up for the upcoming tax season, we would love to take you on as a client. Dagley & Co. specializes in businesses like yours, and we have a stellar track record. You can find our information at the bottom of this screen. We look forward to working with you!

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  • December 2015 Tax Due Dates for Business Owners

    9 December 2015
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    Yesterday, we went over the December 2015 tax due dates for individuals. Those of you who read our blog regularly know that we usually follow up with tax due dates for business owners, and voila, here we go:

    December 1 – Employers

    During December, ask employees whose withholding allowances will be different in 2016 to fill out a new Form W4 or Form W4 (SP).

    December 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in November.

    December 15 – Nonpayroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in November.

    December 15 – Corporations

    The fourth installment of estimated tax for 2015 calendar year corporations is due.

    December 31 – Last Day to Set Up a Keogh Account for 2015

    If you are self-employed, December 31 is the last day to set up a Keogh Retirement Account if you plan to make a 2015 Contribution. If the institution where you plan to set up the account will not be open for business on the 31st, you will need to establish the plan before the 31st. Note: there are other options such as SEP plans that can be set up after the close of the year. Please call the office to discuss your options.

    December 31 – Where did the time go?! It’s the last day of the year!

    This is your last call to make financial moves that can affect your tax year. If the actions you wish to take cannot be completed on the 31st or a single day, you should consider taking action earlier than December 31st. Please set up an appointment with Dagley & Co. before this day so we can get you all squared away in time.

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  • December 2015 Tax Due Dates for Individuals

    8 December 2015
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    Have a merry month – and not a stressful month – with these December tax deadline tips from Dagley & Co! Image via public domain.

    December  – Time for Year-End Tax Planning

    December is the month to take final actions to affect your 2015 taxes. Taxpayers with substantial increases or decreases in income, changes in marital status or dependent status, and those who sold property during 2015 should get in touch with us at Dagley & Company for a tax planning consultation appointment. In case you need more reasons, do read our special post from Black Friday about why we may be the perfect accounting firm for you!

    December 10 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during November, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than December 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    December 31 – Last Day to Make Mandatory IRA Withdrawals

    Last day to withdraw funds from a Traditional IRA Account and avoid a penalty if you turned age 70½ before 2015. If the institution holding your IRA will not be open on December 31, you will need to arrange for withdrawal before that date.

    December 31 – Last Day to Pay Deductible Expenses for 2015

    Last day to pay deductible expenses for the 2015 return (doesn’t apply to IRA, SEP or Keogh contributions, all of which can be made after December 31, 2015). Taxpayers who are making state estimated payments may find it advantageous to prepay the January state estimated tax payment in December (Please call the office for more information).

    December 31 – Where did the time go?! Last Day of the Year!

    If the actions you wish to take cannot be completed on the 31st or a single day, you should consider taking action earlier than December 31st.

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  • Save on Black Friday: Hire Dagley & Company!

    27 November 2015
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    On this hot, hot hot shopping and sales weekend, you may be looking everywhere for the best Black Friday and Small Business Saturday deals. There’s another way to save yourself a lot of money – potentially thousands of dollars – and that is by hiring an accountant from Dagley & Company to do the taxes of you, your family, and/or your small business.

    For starters, our founder, Dan Dagley, has an exceptional track record with taxes and clients. He was a top-10 CPA with TurboTax’s Pro program, which is currently undergoing a makeover. You can read hundreds of his glowing reviews on our testimonials page. If you miss this TurboTax Pro service, Dagley & Company can help fill your need. Get started by getting in touch with us; you’ll find our contact information at the bottom of this screen.

    If you’re one of those people who has never filed for taxes and hasn’t heard from the IRS, then it’s probably because you’re leaving money on the table. Each year, the IRS reports about $1 billion in unclaimed refunds for individuals who did not file a tax return – and about half of them are for amounts greater than $600! You could literally turn a profit simply by dropping us an email, so what are you waiting for?

    Many people are handy at filing their own taxes, but our clients who decide to pivot to our team are consistently amazed at the money they save. It’s unlikely that you know all of the tax credits and benefits you are entitled to! There are credits for those who generate their own renewable energy, there are credits for those paying for education, there are credits for those who are taking care of elderly/disabled relatives, there are tax deductions for start-up businesses, and so many more. Let us sit down with you to see just how much of your own money you’re entitled to keep this year.

    Finally, Dagley & Company is about as convenient as it gets. Yes, we are located in Washington, D.C., but we serve clients all over the United States, as well as a few scattered all over the globe. Best case scenario for you and us is you keep good records on Quickbooks or another digital program, and we can help you file the most accurate, succinct tax forms you’ve ever seen. Whether you prefer email or a personal phone call, we’re here to work with you to save you time and money.

    We hope this has helped you make a decision about the best way to file your taxes – and happy shopping on this Black Friday!

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  • Dagley & Co’s Six Best Practices in Billings and Collections

    5 November 2015
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    Have a small business? One area where you can improve cash flow is in billings and collections. Getting paid late can often hurt a business, and there are ways to get paid faster so you can keep growing. Here are six best practices that can make a real difference in your cash balance at the end of every month.

    1. Get it right.

    One legitimate reason for nonpayment is a confusing or inaccurate invoice. Make sure your invoices spell out in clear, plain English what was purchased, the price, when payment is due, the customer’s PO number, when it was shipped, to where it was shipped, and any tracking number. We highly recommend QuickBooks for all of our clients for easy invoicing and payments.

    You may also want to tighten your sales process. Don’t start work without a formal PO from your business customers—many companies won’t pay against a verbal PO. When you receive a PO, make sure that it matches your quotation. Companies often put their payment terms on their paperwork, so if your customer tries to play this game, resolve any discrepancies before you start work.

    Finally, make certain every shipment and invoice is 100% correct. Set up processes to assure the customer gets exactly what was ordered and that invoices are equally accurate.

    2. Get it out.

    See that four-day-old pile of shipping papers waiting to be invoiced? That’s a pile of cash you can’t collect.

    Set a goal to issue all invoices within one working day of the ship date or completion of work. If your team struggles to meet this, give them the tools and/or manpower to make it happen. And if an invoice gets held up internally, make sure your supervision is immediately notified so the problem can be quickly resolved.

    To further speed payments, try to invoice your customers by email. Some won’t accept emailed invoices, but getting even a portion of your billing done electronically will help overall cash flow.

    3. Get it to the right person.

    How many times has one of your employees called about a past-due payment and been told “we didn’t receive your invoice” or “that needs to be approved by the department manager”? It’s another game, one that can take weeks to play out. As part of getting an accurate customer PO, make sure your sales staff gets a valid address for invoicing.

    Large sales deserve special attention. Where applicable, have your salesperson get the contact information for the customer employee that will approve payment. This might be a department or plant manager and maybe even the business owner. Also get the contact information for the customer’s finance-side people (accounting manager, accounts payable clerk), who will cut and approve the check. When your invoice goes out, make sure they all get a copy.

    4. Get it sooner.

    Offer a discount for early payment—for example, 2% off for payment within 10 days. Not all of your customers will take advantage of this, but it’s a great way to pull cash in.

    5. Get friendly.

    The best way to get paid on time is to build a positive working relationship with your customer before the money is due.

    Have your salesperson call his or her customer contacts shortly after the invoice goes out. Confirm the product has been received or affirm that your assignment is now complete. Ask them if they’re satisfied with your work, what you can do better to improve, and if they’ve received your invoice. This communicates (in a nice way) that it’s time to start the payment process. If these calls uncover problems, it’s an opportunity to address them on the spot as opposed to when payment is past due.

    Your employee responsible for collections should also make a call—in this case, to the customer’s finance-side people. Your employee should confirm the receipt of your invoice, remind them of any discounts for early payment, and check whether there are any administrative problems with the document. They should not ask for a payment date. If possible, they should also try to get to know their counterparts. A simple “How’s the weather where you are?” is a great opening that can lead to a long conversations about, well, everything. Your customer’s payables team can be your best friend later in the collections process, but it won’t happen if you have not built a working relationship.

    There’s one other person who needs to get friendly: you, the business owner or general manager. As your company develops large customers make sure you get to know your customer counterparts. A phone call from you asking “How’s my team doing?” is a great way to initiate a conversation and assure customer satisfaction. For very large projects, make a face-to-face visit. It will pay off later. If the time comes when a payment problem needs to be escalated, you will have an established relationship on which to call.

    6. Make it fun.

    Some companies take the “get friendly” notion to the next level. From putting silly “Thank You!” notes on their invoices, to handing out promotional swag, to sending little stuffed animals for on-time payment, it’s amazing how these goofy gimmicks can change the atmosphere around the collection process.

    You want your customer to smile and shake his head as he signs the check to pay your bill. And if the day comes when your customer needs to decide whom to pay and whom to put off, chances are he will pay you first.

    In Closing

    What about the actual collections process? Good companies contact their customers if a payment is more than five working days late. You should do the same.

    What’s different is that you’ve laid the foundation for a successful endgame. Any excuses for non-payment have been addressed. Your people know whom to call, and you have working contacts who will give you straight answers. Above all, you’ve strengthened the relationship with your customer and have built a basis for future business.

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  • November 2015 Business Due Dates

    1 November 2015
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    It’s hard to believe the end of 2015 is near! Before we list out the tax due dates for businesses, we want to take a moment to remind you to set up a meeting or a phone call with a member of our team at Dagley & Co. so you can get your 2015 taxes squared away. Still not convinced? Read our hundreds of testimonials, compiled by TurboTax from real clients over the last few years.

    November 2 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld

    Income Tax File Form 941 for the third quarter of 2015. Deposit or pay any undeposited tax under the accuracy of deposit rules. If your tax liability is less than $2,500, you can pay it in full with a timely filed return. If you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time, you have until November 10 to file the return.

    November 2 – Certain Small Employers

    Deposit any undeposited tax if your tax liability is $2,500 or more for 2015, but less than $2,500 for the third quarter.

    November 2 – Federal Unemployment Tax

    Deposit the tax owed through September if more than $500.

    November 10 -Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    File Form 941 for the third quarter of 2015. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time.

    November 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in October.

    November 15 – Nonpayroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in October.

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