• Don’t Overlook Tax Deductions for Home Ownership

    20 February 2017
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    As a homeowner, you should be aware of the many tax benefits that go along with ownership. At Dagley & Co., we compiled a list of tax benefits that will be helpful for the current and next year’s tax season:

    Mortgage Interest Deduction – Although it may seem that you will never get that mortgage paid off, keep in mind that unmarried taxpayers and married couples can deduct, as an itemized deduction, the interest on up to $1 million of acquisition debt plus $100,000 of equity debt on their first and second homes, provided the loans are secured by the homes. A married taxpayer filing separately is limited to deducting the interest on $500,000 of acquisition debt and $50,000 of equity debt.

    Home Improvement Loan Interest Deduction – If you took out a loan secured by your home to make improvements on your main or a second home, that mortgage is treated the same as home acquisition debt, and the interest you pay on that loan is deductible as acquisition debt, so long as the combined total acquisition debt of the two homes does not exceed the $1 million limit on acquisition debt. Even if it does exceed the $1 million limit, the excess interest on up to the $100,000 equity debt limit may still be deductible. However, if you used the loan money to make repairs rather than improvements, the debt would only qualify as equity debt.

    Equity Debt – If you used the equity in your home to borrow money to buy a car, take a vacation, or for another use, interest paid on that debt is deductible up to the $100,000 equity debt limit. That is why it is sometimes better to finance large purchases with a deductible home equity loan rather than a non-deductible consumer loan.

    Property Tax Deduction – If you itemize your deductions, you can deduct the property taxes you paid during the year on your home. However, be careful; generally property taxes are billed on a fiscal year basis, so the amount billed may cover parts of two years. You can only deduct what you actually paid during the year. If you have an impound account (sometimes called an escrow account) with your mortgage lender, the amount paid will be included on the lender’s annual statement. Also be aware that if you are subject to the alternative minimum tax (AMT), a deduction for taxes is not allowed when computing the AMT.

    Private Mortgage Insurance Premiums – Generally when home buyers are unable to make a 20% down payment when purchasing a home, the lender will require them to obtain private mortgage insurance (PMI) and the insurance premiums that go along with it. To be deductible, the insurance contract must have been issued after December 31, 2006. Those premiums are deductible if incurred for the purchase of your first or second home, and they are not limited by the $1 million limitation on home acquisition debt.

    The deductible amount of the premiums phases out ratably by 10% for each $1,000 by which the taxpayer’s AGI exceeds $100,000 (10% for each $500 by which a married separate taxpayer’s AGI exceeds $50,000). If AGI is over $109,000 ($54,500 married separate), the deduction is totally phased out.

    Congress failed to extend this deduction, and thus 2016 is the last year for it. If you are stuck with a PMI and your equity in your property has grown to be greater than 20% (you’ve paid down the mortgage balance to 80% of the home’s original appraised value), you may want to contact your lender about removing the PMI, refinancing to get rid of it, or obtaining an updated appraisal. When the balance drops to 78%, the mortgage servicer is required to eliminate PMI. (These rules generally don’t apply if your loan is guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) or Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).)

    Solar Energy Credits – Through 2021, taxpayers can get a tax credit on their federal tax return for purchasing and installing solar electric or solar water heating systems. The credit is 30% of the cost through 2019, at which time it begins to phase out and the credit is reduced to 26% for 2020 and 22% for the final year of 2021.

    The credit is nonrefundable, which means it can only be used to offset a taxpayer’s current tax liability, but any excess can be carried forward to offset tax through 2021. Both the solar electric and the solar water systems qualify for credit if installed on a taxpayer’s primary and secondary residences. However, no credit is allowed for heating water for hot tubs and swimming pools.

    Impairment-Related Home Expenses – If you, your spouse or a dependent living in your home has a physical handicap and you make modifications to the home or install special equipment to alleviate that disability, those costs may be deductible as a medical expense. The portion of the cost of permanent improvements that increases the value of the home is not deductible, but the difference can be included as a medical expense. However, home modifications made to accommodate a home for an individual’s handicap generally do not increase the value of the home and can be included in full with your medical deductions. These improvements include, but are not limited to, the following items:

    • Constructing entrance or exit ramps for the home,
    • Widening doorways at entrances or exits to the home,
    • Adding handrails, support bars and grab bars,
    • Lowering or modifying kitchen cabinets and equipment, and
    • Installing porch and stair lifts.

    Points Deduction – Points are a form of prepaid interest; one point is equal to 1% of a loan amount. Points are often labeled “loan origination fees,” “premium charges,” etc. At times, certain loan charges may be called points but are really amounts lenders charge for setting up a loan. Such “service charge points” aren’t normally deductible.

    Generally, prepaid interest must be amortized (deducted) over the life of a loan; however, tax law carved out a special rule that allows points incurred for purchase of a primary residence to be fully deducted on the return for the year in which they are paid. This special rule also applies to loan points incurred for home improvement loans.

    Home Office Deduction – If you are self-employed, you may qualify for a deduction for the business use of your home, commonly known as the home office deduction. You may also qualify if you are an employee and the use of the home is for the convenience of the employer. In either case the portion of the home used for business qualifies for the deduction only if it is used exclusively for business.

    There are two methods that can be used to determine the deduction: (1) the actual expense method, where you prorate the home expenses such as utilities, insurance, maintenance, interest, taxes and depreciation, or (2) a simplified deduction, which is $5 per square foot of office space, with a maximum square footage of 300. If the latter method is used, mortgage interest and real property tax deductions may be claimed as usual as part of itemized deductions, but a proration of other home-related expenses isn’t deductible. In either case, the deduction is limited to the income from the business activity.

    If you have questions about any of these tax related home ownership deductions/issues, give Dagley & Co. a call. Or, are you considering purchasing a home? Dagely & Co. will help you to understand how the home ownership will impact your taxes.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Thinking of Becoming a Real Estate Flipper?

    9 December 2016
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    Real estate flipping appears to currently be on the rise. With mortgage interest rates low and home prices making a comeback, it has made it a lot easier for people to succeed. If you are unaware, house flipping is purchasing a house or property, improving it and then selling it for a presumed profit. There are many keys to success in house flipping. First, you must find a suitable fixer-upper that is priced under market for its location. Then, you must fix it up and resell it for more than it cost to buy, hold, fix up and resell.

    If you are currently contemplating house flipping, you must keep in mind that to expect a decent amount of taxes deducted out of your share. These taxes play a significant role in the overall transaction, and tax treatment can be quite different depending upon whether you are a dealer, an investor or a homeowner. Dagley & Co. has come up with the following for specifics on your tax treatment:

    • Dealer in Real Estate – Gains received by a non-corporate taxpayer from business operations as a real estate dealer are taxed as ordinary income (10% to 39.6%), and in addition, individual sole proprietors are subject to the self-employment tax of 15.3% of their net profit (the equivalent of the FICA taxes for a self-employed person). Higher-income sole proprietors are also subject to an additional 0.9% Medicare surtax on their earnings. Thus, a dealer will generally pay significantly more tax on the profit than an investor. On the other hand, if the flip results in a loss, the dealer would be able to deduct the entire loss in the year of sale, which would generally reduce his or her tax at the same rates.
    • Investor – Gains as an investor are subject to capital gains rates (maximum of 20%) if the property is held for more than a year (long term). If held short term (less than a year, as will likely be the case for most flippers), ordinary income rates (10% to 39.6%) will apply. An investor is not subject to the self-employment tax, but could be subject to the 3.8% surtax on net investment income for higher-income taxpayers. A downside for the investor who has a loss from the transaction is that, after combining all long- and short-term capital gains and losses for the year, his or her deductible loss is limited to $3,000, with any excess capital loss being carried over to the next year. The rules get a bit more complicated if the investor rents out the property while trying to sell it, but such rules are beyond the scope of this article.
    • Homeowner – If the individual occupies the property as the primary residence while it is being fixed up, he or she would be treated as an investor, with three major differences: (1) if the individual has owned and occupied the property for two years and has not used a homeowner gain exclusion in the two years prior to closing the sale, he or she can exclude gain of up to $250,000 ($500,000 for a married couple); (2) if the transaction results in a loss, the homeowner will not be able to deduct the loss or even use it to offset gains from other sales; and (3) some fix-up costs may be deemed to be repairs rather than improvements, and repairs on one’s primary residence are neither deductible nor includible as part of the cost basis of the home.

    Being a homeowner is easily identifiable, but the distinction between a dealer and an investor is not clearly defined in the tax code. A real estate dealer is a person who buys and sells real estate property with a view to the trading profits to be derived and whose operations are so extensive as to constitute a separate business. A person acquiring property strictly for investment, though disposing of investment assets at intermittent intervals, generally does not deal in real estate on a regular basis.

    This issue has been debated in the tax courts frequently, and both the IRS and the courts have taken the following into consideration:

    • whether the individual is already a dealer in real estate, such as a real estate sales person or broker;
    • the number and frequency of sales (flips);
    • whether the individual is more committed to another profession as opposed to fixing up and selling real estate; and
    • how much personal time is spent making improvements to the “flips” as opposed to another profession or employment.

    The distinction between a dealer and an investor is truly based on the facts and circumstances of each case. Clearly, an individual who is not already in the real estate profession and flips one house is not a dealer. But one who flips five or more houses and/or properties and has substantial profits would probably be considered a dealer. Everything in between becomes various shades of grey, and the facts and circumstances of each case must be considered.

    If you have additional questions about flipping real estate, or need assistance with your specific situation, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • How to Use the Home Sale Gain Exclusion for More than Just Your Home

    18 May 2015
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    One of the best tax breaks we have in the United States is the home-sale exclusion. With careful planning, and provided the rules are followed, the tax code allows the home sale gain exclusion every two years.

    Let’s assume you own a home, perhaps a second (vacation) home, or maybe are even thinking about buying a fixer-upper and flipping it. With careful planning, it is possible to apply the full home sale exclusion to all three of the properties.

    How it works: The tax code allows you to exclude up to $250,000 ($500,000 for married couples) of gain from the sale of your primary residence if you have lived in it and owned it for two of the five years immediately preceding the sale, and you have not previously taken a home sale exclusion within the two years immediately preceding the sale. In addition, there is no limit on the number of times you can use the exclusion, as long as the requirements are met.

    It makes sense to start off by selling the home you currently live in because you probably already meet the two-out-of-five-years ownership and use tests. The next step, if you have a second home, would be to move into it and make it your primary residence. After you have lived there for two full years and it has been more than two years since the previous home was sold, you can sell the property and take the home sale exclusion again. If you are handy, and find the right property, the next possible step would be to purchase and occupy a fixer-upper while you make repairs and improvements in preparation for its eventual sale after the two-year ownership and occupancy rules have been met. When that time is up, you can sell the fixer-upper and take the third exclusion. This makes it possible for a married couple to exclude as much as $1,500,000 of home sale profit in just over four years if they follow the rules carefully and time the sales correctly.

    If you own a rental property, and you occupy the rental for two years prior to its sale, you will be able to exclude a portion of the gain for that property as well. Because so many rental owners were occupying their rentals before selling them and taking a home sale exclusion, Congress enacted a law barring the exclusion of gain attributable to rental periods after 2008. Thus, the home sale exclusion can only be used to exclude gain attributable to periods before 2009 and periods after 2008 in which the home was used as a primary residence.

    Example: You purchased and began renting a residence on July 1, 2005. On July 1, 2013, you occupied the property as your primary residence; and, on August 1, 2015, you sell the property for a gain of $230,000. You had owned the property for a total of 121 months, of which 67 were before 2009 or during which you occupied the property as your primary residence after 2008. Thus .5537 (67/121) of the gain is subject to the exclusion. As a result, $127,351 (.5537 x $230,000) of the gain qualifies for the exclusion.

    In the preceding example, had the gain exceeded the exclusion limits, $250,000 for single taxpayers and $500,000 married taxpayers, the exclusion would have been capped at the exclusion limits.

    There is one final issue to consider. If any of the residences were acquired though a tax-deferred (Sec 1031) exchange from another property, then the residence must be owned for a period of five years prior to its sale to qualify for the exclusion.

    Since some situations may differ, we highly recommend that you consult with us at Dagley & Co. prior to initiating this plan.

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  • Home Improvement Records: Should You Keep Them?

    21 April 2015
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    As the weather warms up, you may be itching to break out your paints, your ladder, or maybe you just want to hire a contractor and leave your home improvements to the experts. After hitting up Home Depot, do you wonder if you should keep your receipts? Should you keep your invoices from your contractor?

    Many taxpayers don’t feel the need to keep home improvement records, thinking the potential gain will never exceed the amount of the exclusion for home gains ($250,000 or $500,000 if both filer and spouse qualify) if they meet the 2-out-of-5-year use and ownership tests. Here are some situations when having home improvement records could save taxes:

    1. The home is owned for a long period of time, and the combination of appreciation in value due to inflation and improvements exceeds the exclusion amount.
    2. The home is converted to a rental property, and the cost and improvements of the home are needed to establish the depreciable basis of the property.
    3. The home is converted to a second residence, and the exclusion might not apply to the sale.
    4. You suffer a casualty loss and retain the home after making repairs.
    5. The home is sold before meeting the 2-year use and ownership requirements.
    6. The home only qualifies for a reduced exclusion because the home is sold before meeting the 2-year use and ownership requirements.
    7. One spouse retains the home after a divorce and is only entitled to a $250,000 exclusion instead of the $500,000 exclusion available to married couples.
    8. There are future tax law changes that could affect the exclusion amounts.

    Everyone hates to keep records, but consider the consequences if you have a gain and a portion of it cannot be excluded. You will be hit with capital gains (CG), and there is a good chance the CG tax rate will be higher than normal simply because the gain pushed you into a higher CG tax bracket. Before deciding not to keep records, carefully consider the potential of having a gain in excess of the exclusion amount.

    If you have questions related to the home gain exclusion or questions about how keeping home improvement records might directly affect you, please get in touch with us at Dagley & Co. You’ll find our information at the bottom of this page.

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