• Want to Reduce Required Minimum Distributions and Extend Your Retirement Benefits?

    11 May 2017
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    Do you find that your required minimum distributions (RMDs) from qualified plans and IRAs are providing unneeded income and a high tax bill? Or, are you afraid that the government’s RMD requirements will leave too little in your retirement plan for your later years? If you answered yes to either of these, good news! You can now use a qualified longevity annuity contract (QLAC) to reduce your RMDs and extend the life of your retirement distributions.

    The government allows individuals to purchase QLACs with their retirement funds, thus reducing the value of those funds (subject to the RMD rules) and in turn reducing the funds’ annual RMDs.

    A QLAC is a deferred-income annuity that begins at an advanced age and that meets the stringent limitations included in the tax regulations. One benefit of a retirement-planning strategy involving QLACs is that they provide a form of longevity insurance, allowing taxpayers to use part of their retirement savings to buy an annuity that helps protect them from outliving their assets.

    The tax-planning benefits of QLACs are twofold:

    • Because the QLAC is purchased using funds from a qualified retirement plan or IRA, that plan’s year-end balance (value) is lowered. This causes the RMDs for future years to be less than they otherwise would be, as the RMD is determined by dividing the account balance (from 12/31 of the prior year) by an annuity factor that is based on the retiree’s age.

    Example: Jack is age 74, and the annuity table lists his remaining distribution period as 23.8 years. The balance of his IRA account on 12/31/2016 is $400,000. Thus, his RMD for 2017 would be $16,807 ($400,000 / 23.8). However, if Jack had purchased a $100,000 QLAC with his IRA funds during 2016, his balance would have been $300,000, and his 2017 RMD would be $12,605 ($300,000 / 23.8). By purchasing the $100,000 QLAC, Jack would have reduced his RMD for 2016 by $4,202 ($16,807 – $12,605). This reduction would continue for all future years. Later, the $100,000 QLAC would provide retirement benefits, likely beginning when Jack reaches age 85.

    (2) Tax on the annuity will be deferred until payments commence under the annuity contract.

    A deferred-income annuity must meet a number of requirements to be treated as a QLAC, including the following:

    Limitation on premiumsWhen buying a QLAC, a taxpayer can use up to the lesser of $125,000 or 25% of his or her total non-Roth IRA balances. The dollar limitation applies to the sum of the premiums paid on all QLAC contracts.

    When distributions must commence Distributions under a QLAC must commence by a specified annuity starting date, which is no later than the first day of the month after the taxpayer’s 85th birthday.

    For additional details about how QLACs might fit into your retirement strategy, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Naming Your IRA Beneficiary

    24 April 2017
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    Designating a beneficiary of your traditional IRA is critically important and more complicated than you may realize. This decision will affect the minimum amounts that you must withdraw from the IRA when you reach age 70 ½, who will get what remains in the account after your death, and how that IRA balance can be paid out to beneficiaries.

    What’s more, a periodic review of whom you’ve named as IRA beneficiaries is vital to ensure that your overall estate planning objectives will be achieved in light of changes in the performance of your IRAs and in your personal, financial, and family situation. For example, if your spouse was named as your beneficiary when you first opened the account several years ago and you’ve subsequently divorced, your ex-spouse will remain the beneficiary of your IRA unless you notify your IRA custodian to change the beneficiary designation.

    The issue of naming a trust as the beneficiary of an IRA comes up regularly. There is no tax advantage to naming a trust as the IRA beneficiary. Of course, there may be a non-tax-related reason, such as controlling a beneficiary’s access to money; thus, naming a trust rather than an individual(s) as the beneficiary of an IRA could achieve that goal. However, that is not typically the case. Naming a trust as the beneficiary of an IRA eliminates the ability for multiple beneficiaries to maximize the opportunity to stretch the required minimum distributions (RMDs) over their individual life expectancies.

    Generally, trusts are drafted so that IRA RMDs will pass through the trust directly to the individual trust beneficiary and, therefore, be taxed at the beneficiary’s income tax rate. However, if the trust does not permit distribution to the beneficiary, then the RMDs will be taxed at the trust level, which has a tax rate of 39.6% on any taxable income in excess of $12,500 (2017 rate). This high tax rate applies at a much lower income level than for individuals.

    Distributions from traditional IRAs are always taxable whether they are paid to you or, upon your death, paid to your beneficiaries. Once you reach age 70 ½, you are required to begin taking distributions from your IRA. If your spouse is your beneficiary, he or she can delay distributions until he or she reaches age 70 ½ if your spouse is under the age of 70 ½ upon inheritance of your IRA. The rules are tougher for non-spousal beneficiaries, who generally must begin taking distributions based upon a complicated set of rules.

    Since IRA distributions are taxable to beneficiaries, beneficiaries usually wish to spread the taxation over a number of years. However, the tax code limits the number of years based on whether the decedent has begun his or her age 70 ½ RMDs at the time of his or her death.

    To ensure that your IRA will pass to your chosen beneficiary or beneficiaries, be certain that the beneficiary form on file with the custodian of your IRA reflects your current wishes. These forms allow you to designate both primary and alternate individual beneficiaries. If there is no beneficiary form on file, the custodian’s default policy will dictate whether the IRA will go first to a living person or to your estate.

    This is a simplified overview of the issues related to naming a beneficiary and the impact on post-death distributions. Uncle Sam wants the tax paid on the distributions, and the rules pertaining to how and when beneficiaries must take taxable distributions are very complicated.

    It should also be noted that some members of Congress have expressed their displeasure with stretch-out IRAs that have permitted some beneficiaries to extend for decades the payout period from the IRAs they inherited. These legislators would prefer that total distribution from inherited IRAs be made within five years after the IRA owner’s death. So it is possible that we will see tax law changes in this area.

    It may be appropriate to consult with Dagley & Co. regarding your particular circumstances before naming beneficiaries.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • February 2017 Individual Due Dates

    2 February 2017
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    As the busy month of January passes by, February is known as the shortest month of the year. We’ve created a list of individual due dates to help keep you organized:

    February 1 – Tax Appointment

    If you don’t already have an appointment scheduled with Dagley & Co., you should call to make an appointment that is convenient for you.

    February 10 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during January, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than February 10.

    Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    February 15 – Last Date to Claim Exemption from Withholding

    If you claimed an exemption from income tax withholding last year on the Form W-4 you gave your employer, you must file a new Form W-4 by this date to continue your exemption for another year.

    Give us a call at (202) 417-6640 to make an appointment.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • What Does the Future Hold for Taxes?

    23 January 2017
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    It has only been three short days after the 2017 Inauguration of President Trump, and  already one topic that is frequently being discussed is what the future holds for individual taxation. Predictions are based upon President Trump’s proposal to consolidate the individual income tax rates from seven to three: 12, 25 and 3%. As it is probably too early to have a clear picture of future tax reforms, we are definite that change is sure to come.

    Current Marginal Tax Rates Effective For 2017

    Current Rates (2017) Single Head of Household Married Filing Jointly
    10% $0 to $9,325 $0 to $13,350 $0 to $18,650
    15% $9,326 to $37,950 $13,351 to $50,800 $18,651 to $75,900
    25% $37,951 to $91,900 $50,801 to $131,200 $75,901 to $153,100
    28% $91,901 to $191,650 $131,201 to $212,500 $153,101 to $233,350
    33% $191,651 to $416,700 $212,501 to $416,700 $233,351 to $416,700
    35% $416,701 to $418,400 $416,701 to $444,550 $416,701 to $470,700
    39.6% $418,401 and greater $444,551 and greater $470,701 and greater

     

    Trump’s Proposed Marginal Tax Rates

    Trump’s Proposed Rates Single Head of Household Married Filing Jointly
    12% $0 to $37,500 Use Single Rates $0 to $75,000
    25% $37,501 to $112,500 Use Single Rates $75,001 to $225,000
    33% $112,501 and greater Use Single Rates $225,001 and greater

    Under Trump’s plan, the two highest current rates, 39.6% and 35%, would be eliminated, which generally favors higher-income taxpayers. However, the tax brackets alone do not tell the whole story.

    Trump is also proposing more than doubling the standard deductions, which would generally benefit lower-income taxpayers. Because the marginal tax rates apply only to taxable income (which is currently defined as adjusted gross income minus personal exemptions and deductions—either standard or itemized), the increase in the standard deduction will tend to neutralize the higher marginal rates for lower-income taxpayers.

     

    Proposed Standard Deduction Increase

    Filing Status Current (2017) Trump’s Proposal
    Single $6,350 $15,000
    Married Filing Jointly $12,700 $30,000

    According to an estimate by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, of the 45 million filers who would itemize their deductions in 2017, 27 million (60 percent) would opt for the standard deduction under the proposed rules.

    To see how the proposal’s combination of new tax rates, higher standard deductions, and cap on itemized deductions (discussed below) could affect your taxes, pull out your 1040 tax return from either 2015 or 2016 and complete the worksheet below. Then compare line 6 (your tax computed using Trump’s proposed three-tier tax rates and standard deductions) to line 7 (your tax as computed on a prior 1040) to get a rough idea of how these tax proposals could impact you.

     

    Line Description
    1 Adjusted Gross Income – Enter the amount from line 38 on a prior 1040.
    2a Deductions – Enter the amount from line 40 on a prior 1040.
    2b Trump’s Standard Deduction – Enter $15,000 if filing as single or $30,000 if married filing jointly.
    2c Deductions – Enter the larger of line 2a or 2b.
    3 Exemptions – Enter the amount from line 42 on a prior 1040.
    4 Enter the sum of lines 2c and 3.
    5 Taxable Income – Subtract line 4 from line 1 and enter the difference.
    6 Trump Tax – Using Trump’s tax-rate schedule above, enter the tax on the amount given in line 5.
    7 Prior Tax – Enter the amount from line 44 on a prior 1040.

     

    Trump’s Rate Schedule: Single

    Over But Not Over The tax is Of the amount over
    $0 $37,500 —–      + 12% $0
    $37,500 $112,500 $4,500   + 25% $37,500
    $112,500 —- $23,250   + 33% $112,500

     

    Trump’s Rate Schedule: Married Filing Jointly

    Over But Not Over The tax is Of the amount over
    $0 $75,000 —–       + 12% $0
    $75,000 $225,000 $9,000     + 25% $75,000
    $225,000 —- $46,500    + 33% $225,000

     

    Trump also proposes capping itemized deductions at $100,000 for single filers and $200,000 for joint filers. This will generally affect wealthy taxpayers. Under current law, certain itemized deductions phase out for high-income taxpayers. It is unclear whether that provision will be replaced by the proposed cap on itemized deductions or whether both will apply. If the cap is adopted, the amount entered on line 2c of the worksheet above will be limited based on the proposed cap amounts.

    Although this is not clear, Trump’s proposals may include the elimination of personal exemptions. If true, this change would have the greatest effect on lower-income taxpayers because these exemptions are already phased-out for higher-income taxpayers. Those with large families could be impacted the most. If the personal exemptions are eliminated, the amount on line 3 of the worksheet above would be zero.

    Not the Whole Picture – The tax-rate changes, higher standard deductions, and limitations on itemized deductions don’t paint the whole picture of the proposal. It is unclear what will happen to the numerous credits available to lower-income taxpayers under the current tax system. Approximately 48% of all U.S. taxpayers pay no tax at all, and most of them actually receive money back on their returns as a result of refundable tax credits such as the earned income tax credit, the additional child tax credit, and the American Opportunity Tax Credit (a tuition credit).

    The Republicans have started the process of appealing the Affordable Care Act (also referred to as the ACA or Obamacare), and now that they have majorities in both houses of Congress and control of the White House, we are bound to see some changes in this area. The health care marketplaces have already accepted insurance coverage for 2017, so it is doubtful that there will be any changes until 2018. However, Trump has vowed to overturn the ACA’s 3.8% excise tax on net investment income; eliminating this tax would greatly benefit higher-income taxpayers.

    If you have questions about how your tax situation may be impacted, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • W-2 and 1099-MISC Filing Dates Moved Up

    19 December 2016
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    Dagley & Co. is here to give you up-to-date tax and tax requirement details and due dates. Please read the following regarding a delay in a tax return due date:

    The IRS, in an effort to combat rampant tax filing fraud, has introduced what they hope will be two new fraud-prevention measures for the upcoming filing season. The first will purposely delay until February 15 the issuance of refunds for tax returns where there is an earned income tax credit (EITC) and/or a refundable child tax credit (CTC), giving the IRS more time to match the income reported on these returns to the income reported by employers. These two tax credits have been the favorite target of scammers who have been filing fraudulent returns with stolen IDs and fabricated income before the IRS is able to verify the income and withholding claimed on the returns.

    The second preventive measure is to require earlier filing of W-2 and 1099-MISC forms, which will enable the IRS to ferret out returns that report phony income and withholding. This measure will have a significant impact on employers by moving up the filing due date of the government’s copy of 2016 W-2s and 1099-MISCs to January 31, 2017 (the previous due date was February 28, or March 31 if filed electronically). January 31 has been and continues to be the date the forms are required to be provided to the employees (W-2s) or independent contractors (1099-MISCs).

    The 30-day automatic extension to file W-2s is no longer automatic. The IRS anticipates that it will grant the non-automatic extension of time to file only in limited cases where the filer or transmitter’s explanation demonstrates that an extension of time to file is needed as a result of extraordinary circumstances.

    With regard to the government’s copy of 1099-MISC forms, the earlier filing due date only applies to those 1099-MISC forms reporting non-employee compensation.

    If you have questions related to W-2 or 1099-MISC requirements, please give Dagley & Co. a call at (202) 417-6640.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Tax Benefits for Single Parents

    7 December 2016
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    Are you a single parent? If so, we all know that working and raising a family can become extremley difficult on your own. For your benefit, Dagley & Co. has found a number of tax benefits/issues that you should be aware of. Please carefully read and understand the following:

    Filing Status – Just because you are single or widowed does not mean you have to file your tax returns using the single filing status. Tax law provides two far more beneficial filing statuses that you might qualify for. These statuses provide higher standard deductions and more beneficial tax rates:

    Head of Household – If you are unmarried and pay more than half the cost of maintaining a household that is the principal place of abode for your qualified child or children for more than one-half of the year, then you qualify for the head of household status. Qualified children generally include your children, grandchildren, foster children or stepchildren under the age of 19 or a full-time student under the age of 24 who is not self-supporting.  This is true even if you allow the other parent to deduct the dependency exemption for the child.

    Qualified Widow – If you are widowed, you may qualify for the head of household status discussed just above.  However, if your spouse passed away in one of the two prior years, you have a child or stepchild (not including a foster child or grandchild) whom you can claim as a dependent and who lived with you the whole year, and you paid more than half the cost of keeping up the home, you can use the higher standard deduction for married individuals filing jointly. In comparison, in 2016, the standard deduction for marrieds filing jointly is $12,600, which is twice the amount for a single individual.

    Child Support – Any child support you receive from the non-custodial parent is tax-free to you. Child support is also not included in household income for the purposes of determining the premium tax credit if you are otherwise qualified and obtain your health insurance through a government marketplace.

    Alimony – In most cases alimony payments received from your former spouse must be included in your income and are subject to tax. However, you can treat the alimony as earned income for purposes of making an IRA contribution of as much as $5,500 ($6,500 for those age 50 and over).

    Exemptions – You are entitled to an exemption allowance of $4,050 for yourself and each of your children and others whom you claim as dependents on your tax return. Generally, the custodial parent will be the one eligible to claim a child’s exemption allowance. The value of the exemptions you claim is subtracted from your gross income when you are figuring out the amount of your taxable income. For example, if you are in the 25% tax bracket, each exemption allowance you deduct saves you $1,013 of tax. However, if you allow the non-custodial parent to claim the exemption of a qualified child, then you forego the $4,050 exemption allowance for that child.

    Releasing the exemption of a child to the noncustodial parent must be done in writing and to IRS’s specifications as to required information. The noncustodial parent must then attach the written form to his or her return. The release can be for one year, for specified years or for all future years. If the exemption for the child is released, then the noncustodial parent will be able to claim the child tax credit (discussed below). Note: If a child is older and attending college, keep in mind when relinquishing the child’s exemption that the partially refundable tuition credit goes to the one who claims the child.

    Child Care Credit – If your child or children are under age 13, and you are working or attending school, you may qualify for the non-refundable child and dependent care credit, which is based upon the amount of your earnings from working (or imputed income if attending school) and the amount of child care expenses, up to $3,000 for one child and $6,000 for two or more children. The credit can be as much as $1,050 for one child and $2,100 for two.

    Child Tax Credit – You are also entitled to a non-refundable tax credit of $1,000 for each child under the age of 17 that you claim as a dependent. However, this credit begins to phase out for those filing as head of household with incomes in excess of $75,000. Some taxpayers with lower income may qualify for some portion of this credit to be refundable.

    Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) – If you are working, you may also qualify for the EITC. This refundable credit is available to lower-income taxpayers and is based on your income and the number of children you have, up to three. The maximum credits for 2016 are $506 with no children, $3,373 with one, $5,572 with two, and $6,269 with three or more. The credit is totally phased out at incomes of $14,880 with no children, $39,296 with one, $44,648 with two, and $47,955 with three or more.

    As you can see, there are a number of tax benefits that apply to single parents. As always, please contact Dagley & Co. with any questions or issues. If you are a custodial parent, before releasing your child’s exemption to the noncustodial parent, you may wish to contact Dagley & Co. so the tax impact on your return(s) can be determined.

     

     

     

     

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  • December 2016 Business Due Dates

    5 December 2016
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    …And just like that it’s the first week of December! Year-end is quickly approaching, and so is the busy holiday season. Dagley & Co. has complied and easy-to-understand list of business due dates for you and your company. We reccomend adding them to you calendars ASAP. Contat us with any questions!

    December 1 – Employers

    During December, ask employees whose withholding allowances will be different in 2017 to fill out a new Form W4 or Form W4(SP).

    December 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in November.

    December 15 – Non-Payroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in November.

    December 15 – Corporations

    The fourth installment of estimated tax for 2016 calendar year corporations is due.

    December 31 – Last Day to Set Up a Keogh Account for 2016

    If you are self-employed, December 31 is the last day to set up a Keogh Retirement Account if you plan to make a 2016 Contribution. If the institution where you plan to set up the account will not be open for business on the 31st, you will need to establish the plan before the 31st. Note: there are other options such as SEP plans that can be set up after the close of the year. Please call the office to discuss your options.

    December 31 – Caution! Last Day of the Year

    If the actions you wish to take cannot be completed on the 31st or a single day, you should consider taking action earlier than December 31st.

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Having a Low Taxable Income Year? Ways to Take Advantage of It

    17 November 2016
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    Are you having a low taxable income year? Are you unemployed, had an accident that’s kept you from earning income, incurring a net operating loss (NOL) from a business, or suffering a casualty loss? These incidents will result in abnormally low taxable income for the year. But, these can actually give rise to some interesting tax planning strategies. See below for some key elements that govern tax rates and taxable income, and some actual strategies by Dagley & Co.

    Taxable Income – First, of all, to be simplistic, taxable income is your adjusted gross income (AGI) less the sum of your personal exemptions and the greater of the standard deduction for your filing status or your itemized deductions:

    AGI                        XXXX

    Exemptions              <XXXX>

    Deductions              <XXXX>

    Taxable Income        XXXX

    If the exemptions and deductions exceed the AGI, you can end up with a negative taxable income, which means to the extent it is negative you can actually add income or reduce deductions without incurring any tax.

    Graduated Individual Tax Rates – Ordinary individual tax rates are graduated. So as the taxable income increases, so do the tax rates. Thus, the lower your taxable income, the lower your tax rate will be. Individual ordinary tax rates range from 10% to as high 39.6%. The taxable income amounts for 10% to 25% tax rates are:

    Filing Status

    (2016)

    Single Married Filing Jointly Head of Household Married Filing Separate
    10% 9,275 18,550 13,250 9,275
    15% 37,650 75,300 50,400 37,650
    25% 91,150 151,900 130,150 75,950

    For instance, if you are single, your first $9,275 of taxable income is taxed at 10%. The next $28,375 ($37,650 – $9,275) is taxed at 15% and the next $53,500 ($91,150 – $37,650) is taxed at 25%.

    Here are some strategies you can employ for your tax benefit. However, these strategies may be interdependent on one another and your particular tax circumstances.

    Take IRA Distributions – Depending upon your projected taxable income, you might consider taking an IRA distribution to add income for the year. For instance, if the projected taxable income is negative, you can actually take a withdrawal of up to the negative amount without incurring any tax. Even if projected taxable income is not negative and your normal taxable income would put you in the 25% or higher bracket, you might want to take out just enough to be taxed at the 10% or even the 15% tax rates. Of course, those are retirement dollars; consider moving them into a regular financial account set aside for your retirement. Also be aware that distributions before age 59½ are subject to a 10% early withdrawal penalty.

    Defer Deductions – When you itemize your deductions, you may claim only the deductions you actually pay during the tax year (the calendar year for most folks). If your projected taxable income is going to be negative and you are planning on itemizing your deductions, you might consider putting off some of those year-end deductible payments until after the first of the year and preserving the deductions for next year. Such payments might include house of worship tithing, year-end charitable giving, tax payments (but not those incurring late payment penalties), estimated state income tax payments, medical expenses, etc.

    Convert Traditional IRA Funds into a Roth IRA – To the extent of the negative taxable income or even just the lower tax rates, you may wish to consider converting some or all of your traditional IRA into a Roth IRA. The lower income results in a lower tax rate, which provides you with an opportunity to convert to a Roth IRA at a lower tax amount.

    Zero Capital Gains Rate – There is a zero long-term capital gains rate for those taxpayers whose regular tax brackets are 15% or less (see table above). This may allow you to sell some appreciated securities that you have owned for more than a year and pay no or very little tax on the gain.

    Business Expenses – The tax code has some very liberal provisions that allow a business to currently expense, rather than capitalize and slowly depreciate, the purchase cost of certain property. In a low-income year it may be appropriate to capitalize rather than expense these current year purchases and preserve the deprecation deduction for higher income years. This is especially true where there is a negative taxable income in the current year.

    If you have obtained your medical insurance through a government marketplace, employing any of the strategies mentioned could impact the amount of your allowable premium tax credit.

    Interested in discussing how these strategies might provide you tax benefit based upon your particular tax circumstances? Or, would like to schedule a tax planning appointment? Give Dagley & Co. a call today at (202) 417-6640.

     

     

     

     

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  • Accounting 101: How to Read an Income Statement

    3 November 2016
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    An income statement is a very important document that your company produces. This statement can be challenging to prepare if you are new to the business, or if you are not familiar. We have gathered some good tips and tricks to make it easier for you to read and prepare you income statement accurately.

    What is an Income Statement?

    An income statement, which may also be referred to as a “profit and loss statement,” is an important financial report that communicates your business’s ability to earn a profit. This statement includes information about the money that came into your company during a given period, the expenses your company incurred during that period, and the total amount of profit you earned after all expenses were paid. If your expenses during this time exceeded the amount of income you earned, your income statement will show a loss for the period.

    Sections of an Income Statement

    In most cases, your income statement will be divided into various sections, including Revenue, Operating Expenses and Taxes. Within each section, smaller subsections exist to provide more detailed information. The final line on the statement provides your net profit or loss, which is calculated as the difference between your revenue and all of the expenses paid to earn that revenue.

    Not every income statement includes the same information. However, most statements will include the following lines:

    • Heading– At the top of the statement, you will find a heading that provides the name of your company and the period of time the statement covers.
    • Revenue– The “Revenue” subheading begins the section of the statement that provides details about revenue earned during the period.
    • Gross Sales– This line of the statement tells you the value of all sales made during the period before any deductions for expenses.
    • Returns and Allowances– Returns and Allowances include the cost of any goods returned by customers or discounted by your company.
    • Net Sales– Net Sales is calculated by subtracting the value of Returns and Allowances from your Gross Sales.
    • Cost of Goods Sold– This line lists the total wholesale cost of all of the goods you sold during the period.
    • Gross Profit– Gross Profit is calculated by deducting the Cost of Goods Sold from Net Sales.
    • Operating Expenses– The Operating Expenses subheading begins the section of the income statement that includes all of the expenses your company paid to operate during the period in question.
    • Sales and Marketing– Beneath the Operating Expenses subheading, you will find a smaller subheading labeled “Sales and Marketing.” In this section, you will find a list of all of the expenses your company incurred in relation to marketing. Examples include advertising, commissions and direct marketing. At the bottom of this section, you will find a total of these expenses.
    • General Administrative– This section of the document includes all of the administrative expenses paid during the period, including office supplies, utilities and more. At the end of this section, all general administrative expenses are totaled.
    • Depreciation and Amortization– Under this heading, any expensive assets your business is currently depreciating will be listed, along with the total amount of depreciation for the period.
    • Total Operating Expenses– This section of the income statement provides the total of your operating expenses for the period, including depreciation, administrative expenses and advertising expenses.
    • Operating Income– Your Operating Income is the amount of income left over after all of your operating expenses are deducted from your gross profit.
    • Non-operating Income– This section includes all of the income you earned outside of your standard operations, such as by the sale of assets or investments.
    • Non-operating Expenses– Non-operating expenses include expenses you paid that were not related to the operations of your business. These expenses may be related to earning non-operating income.
    • Income before Taxes– The value on this line is calculated by adding your Operating Income and Non-operating Income and then subtracting your Non-operating Expenses.
    • Taxes– This section includes all of the taxes your business paid during the period, including prepaid income tax and payroll taxes.
    • Total Net Income– The final line on your income statement is your total net income. It is calculated by subtracting your total Taxes from Income before Taxes. If your expenses for the period exceeded your income, this value will be negative, representing an overall loss.

    Getting Professional Help

    Preparing an income statement is no easy task, and interpreting it can also be difficult for many business owners. Dagley & Co. will not only ensure that your income statement is accurate, but we will also be able to help you gain important insight from these statements that can be used to boost your business’s profitability in the future. Give us a call today at (202) 417-6640.

     

     

     

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  • November 2016 Individual Due Dates

    28 October 2016
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    November 10 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during October, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than November 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    November 2016 Business Due Dates

    November 10 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    File Form 941 for the third quarter of 2016. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time.

    November 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in October.

    November 15 – Non-Payroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in October.

     

     

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