• Thinking of Tapping Your Retirement Savings? Read This First

    22 May 2017
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    Before you start tapping into your retirement savings, you may want to read this first:

    If you are under age 59½ and plan to withdraw money from a qualified retirement account, you will likely pay both income tax and a 10% early-distribution tax on any previously un-taxed money that you take out. Withdrawals you make from a SIMPLE IRA before age 59½ and those you make during the 2-year rollover restriction period after establishing the SIMPLE IRA may be subject to a 25% additional early-distribution tax instead of the normal 10%. The 2-year period is measured from the first day that contributions are deposited. These penalties are just what you’d pay on your federal return; your state may also charge an early-withdrawal penalty in addition to the regular state income tax.

    The following exceptions may help you avoid the penalty:

    • Withdrawals from any retirement plan to pay medical expenses—Amounts withdrawn to pay unreimbursed medical expenses are exempt from penalty if they would be deductible on Schedule A during the year and if they exceed 10% of your adjusted gross income. This is true even if you do not
    • IRA withdrawals annuitized over your lifetime—To qualify, the withdrawals must continue unchanged for a minimum of 5 years, including after you reach age 59½.
    • Employer retirement plan withdrawals—To qualify, you must be separated from service and be age 55 or older in that year (the lower limit is age 50 for qualified public-service employees such as police officers and firefighters) or elect to receive the money in substantially equal periodic payments after your separation from service.
    • Withdrawals from any retirement plan as a result of a disability—You are considered disabled if you can furnish proof that you cannot perform any substantial gainful activities because of a physical or mental condition. A physician must certify your condition.
    • IRA withdrawals by unemployed individuals to pay medical insurance premiums—The amount that is exempt from penalty cannot be more than the amount you paid during the year for medical insurance for yourself, your spouse, and your dependents. You also must have received unemployment compensation for at least 12 weeks during the year.
    • IRA withdrawals to pay higher education expenses—Withdrawals made during the year for qualified higher education expenses for yourself, your spouse, or your children or grandchildren are exempt from the early-withdrawal penalty.
    • IRA withdrawals to buy, build, or rebuild a first home—Generally, you are considered a first-time homebuyer for this exception if you had no present interest in a main home during the 2-year period leading up to the date the home was acquired, and the distribution must be used to buy, build, or rebuild that home. If you are married, your spouse must also meet this no-ownership requirement. This exception applies only to the first $10,000 of withdrawals used for this purpose. If married, you and your spouse can each withdraw up to $10,000 penalty-free from your respective IRA accounts.

    You should be aware that the information provided above is an overview of the penalty exceptions and that conditions other than those listed above may need to be met before qualifying for a particular exception. You are encouraged to contact this office before tapping your retirement funds for uses other than retirement. Distributions are most often subject to both normal taxes and other penalties, which can take a significant bite out of the distribution. However, with carefully planned distributions, both the taxes and the penalties can be minimized. Please call Dagley & Co. for assistance.

     

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  • Want to Reduce Required Minimum Distributions and Extend Your Retirement Benefits?

    11 May 2017
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    Do you find that your required minimum distributions (RMDs) from qualified plans and IRAs are providing unneeded income and a high tax bill? Or, are you afraid that the government’s RMD requirements will leave too little in your retirement plan for your later years? If you answered yes to either of these, good news! You can now use a qualified longevity annuity contract (QLAC) to reduce your RMDs and extend the life of your retirement distributions.

    The government allows individuals to purchase QLACs with their retirement funds, thus reducing the value of those funds (subject to the RMD rules) and in turn reducing the funds’ annual RMDs.

    A QLAC is a deferred-income annuity that begins at an advanced age and that meets the stringent limitations included in the tax regulations. One benefit of a retirement-planning strategy involving QLACs is that they provide a form of longevity insurance, allowing taxpayers to use part of their retirement savings to buy an annuity that helps protect them from outliving their assets.

    The tax-planning benefits of QLACs are twofold:

    • Because the QLAC is purchased using funds from a qualified retirement plan or IRA, that plan’s year-end balance (value) is lowered. This causes the RMDs for future years to be less than they otherwise would be, as the RMD is determined by dividing the account balance (from 12/31 of the prior year) by an annuity factor that is based on the retiree’s age.

    Example: Jack is age 74, and the annuity table lists his remaining distribution period as 23.8 years. The balance of his IRA account on 12/31/2016 is $400,000. Thus, his RMD for 2017 would be $16,807 ($400,000 / 23.8). However, if Jack had purchased a $100,000 QLAC with his IRA funds during 2016, his balance would have been $300,000, and his 2017 RMD would be $12,605 ($300,000 / 23.8). By purchasing the $100,000 QLAC, Jack would have reduced his RMD for 2016 by $4,202 ($16,807 – $12,605). This reduction would continue for all future years. Later, the $100,000 QLAC would provide retirement benefits, likely beginning when Jack reaches age 85.

    (2) Tax on the annuity will be deferred until payments commence under the annuity contract.

    A deferred-income annuity must meet a number of requirements to be treated as a QLAC, including the following:

    Limitation on premiumsWhen buying a QLAC, a taxpayer can use up to the lesser of $125,000 or 25% of his or her total non-Roth IRA balances. The dollar limitation applies to the sum of the premiums paid on all QLAC contracts.

    When distributions must commence Distributions under a QLAC must commence by a specified annuity starting date, which is no later than the first day of the month after the taxpayer’s 85th birthday.

    For additional details about how QLACs might fit into your retirement strategy, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • May 2017 Individual Due Dates

    28 April 2017
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    A new month is upon us. Dalgey & Co. has your two individual due dates from May 2017:

    May 10 – Report Tips to Employer 

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during April, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than May 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.
    May 31 –  Final Due Date for IRA Trustees to Issue Form 5498 

    Final due date for IRA trustees to issue Form 5498, providing IRA owners with the fair market value (FMV) of their IRA accounts as of December 31, 2016. The FMV of an IRA on the last day of the prior year (Dec 31, 2016) is used to determine the required minimum distribution (RMD) that must be taken from the IRA if you are age 70½ or older during 2017. If you are age 70½ or older during 2017 and need assistance determining your RMD for the year, please give this office a call. Otherwise, no other action is required and the Form 5498 can be filed away with your other tax documents for the year.

    Contact Dagley & Co. with any questions regarding May’s individual due dates.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Naming Your IRA Beneficiary

    24 April 2017
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    Available Lease Signature Contract

    Designating a beneficiary of your traditional IRA is critically important and more complicated than you may realize. This decision will affect the minimum amounts that you must withdraw from the IRA when you reach age 70 ½, who will get what remains in the account after your death, and how that IRA balance can be paid out to beneficiaries.

    What’s more, a periodic review of whom you’ve named as IRA beneficiaries is vital to ensure that your overall estate planning objectives will be achieved in light of changes in the performance of your IRAs and in your personal, financial, and family situation. For example, if your spouse was named as your beneficiary when you first opened the account several years ago and you’ve subsequently divorced, your ex-spouse will remain the beneficiary of your IRA unless you notify your IRA custodian to change the beneficiary designation.

    The issue of naming a trust as the beneficiary of an IRA comes up regularly. There is no tax advantage to naming a trust as the IRA beneficiary. Of course, there may be a non-tax-related reason, such as controlling a beneficiary’s access to money; thus, naming a trust rather than an individual(s) as the beneficiary of an IRA could achieve that goal. However, that is not typically the case. Naming a trust as the beneficiary of an IRA eliminates the ability for multiple beneficiaries to maximize the opportunity to stretch the required minimum distributions (RMDs) over their individual life expectancies.

    Generally, trusts are drafted so that IRA RMDs will pass through the trust directly to the individual trust beneficiary and, therefore, be taxed at the beneficiary’s income tax rate. However, if the trust does not permit distribution to the beneficiary, then the RMDs will be taxed at the trust level, which has a tax rate of 39.6% on any taxable income in excess of $12,500 (2017 rate). This high tax rate applies at a much lower income level than for individuals.

    Distributions from traditional IRAs are always taxable whether they are paid to you or, upon your death, paid to your beneficiaries. Once you reach age 70 ½, you are required to begin taking distributions from your IRA. If your spouse is your beneficiary, he or she can delay distributions until he or she reaches age 70 ½ if your spouse is under the age of 70 ½ upon inheritance of your IRA. The rules are tougher for non-spousal beneficiaries, who generally must begin taking distributions based upon a complicated set of rules.

    Since IRA distributions are taxable to beneficiaries, beneficiaries usually wish to spread the taxation over a number of years. However, the tax code limits the number of years based on whether the decedent has begun his or her age 70 ½ RMDs at the time of his or her death.

    To ensure that your IRA will pass to your chosen beneficiary or beneficiaries, be certain that the beneficiary form on file with the custodian of your IRA reflects your current wishes. These forms allow you to designate both primary and alternate individual beneficiaries. If there is no beneficiary form on file, the custodian’s default policy will dictate whether the IRA will go first to a living person or to your estate.

    This is a simplified overview of the issues related to naming a beneficiary and the impact on post-death distributions. Uncle Sam wants the tax paid on the distributions, and the rules pertaining to how and when beneficiaries must take taxable distributions are very complicated.

    It should also be noted that some members of Congress have expressed their displeasure with stretch-out IRAs that have permitted some beneficiaries to extend for decades the payout period from the IRAs they inherited. These legislators would prefer that total distribution from inherited IRAs be made within five years after the IRA owner’s death. So it is possible that we will see tax law changes in this area.

    It may be appropriate to consult with Dagley & Co. regarding your particular circumstances before naming beneficiaries.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Can’t Pay Your Tax Liability?

    13 April 2017
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    Can’t pay your tax liability for 2016? We have the information you need to know:

    First, do not let your inability to pay your tax liability in full keep you from filing your tax return on time. If your return is not on time, you must still pay the “failure to file” penalty, which accrues at a rate of 5% per month on the amount of tax that you owe based on your return.

    If in doubt, you can delay the “failure to file” penalty for six months by filing an extension, but this still won’t keep you penalty free.

    Although an extension provides you with more time to file your actual return, it is not an extension of your payment date. If you do not pay the balance of your 2016 tax liability, you will be subject to the “failure to pay” penalty. This penalty accrues at the rate of 0.5% per month or partial month (up to a maximum of 25%) on the amount that you owe based on your return.

    If both penalties apply, the “failure to file” penalty drops to 4.5% per month or part thereof, so the total combined penalty remains 5%. The maximum combined penalty for the first five months is thus 25%. Thereafter, the “failure to pay” penalty will continue to increase at 1/2% per month for 45 more months (up to an additional 22.5%). Thus, the combined penalties can reach a total of 47.5% over time. Both of these penalties are in addition to the interest charges on the late payments.

    The bottom line is that, if you owe money, it is best to file your return on time even if you can’t pay the entire liability. That will minimize your penalties. Paying as much as you can with your return will further minimizing your penalties. By the way, neither the penalties nor the interest are tax-deductible.

    Possible Solutions – The following are possible ways to pay your tax liability when you don’t have the funds readily available:

    • Relatives and Friends – Borrowing money from family members or close friends is often the simplest method to pay a tax bill. One advantage of such loans is that the interest rate will probably be low; however, you must also consider that loans of more than $10,000 at below-market interest rates may trigger tax consequences. Any interest paid on this type of loan would be nondeductible.
    • Home-Equity Loans – A home-equity loan is another potential source of funds; such a loan has the advantage that the interest is deductible as long as the total equity loans on the home don’t exceed $100,000. However, in today’s financial environment, qualifying for these loans may be too time-consuming.
    • Credit or Debit Cards – Using your credit card to pay your taxes is another option. The IRS has approved three firms to provide this service. The disadvantages are that the interest rates are relatively high and that you must pay the merchant fee (because the IRS does not). For information about this fee and about making payments by credit card, visit the IRS website.
    • Installment Agreements – You can request an installment arrangement with the IRS. You must be up-to-date when filing your returns. There are also fees associated with setting up an installment agreement, and if you do not follow some strict payment rules, the agreement can be terminated. If your liability is under $50,000 and you can pay off the full liability within 6 years, you will not be required to submit financial statements, and you can apply online. When applying online, you’ll get an immediate acceptance or rejection of your payment plan.

    The fee for establishing such an agreement can be as high as $225, but it can be as low as $31 if you set up an online payment agreement and pay using direct debit from your bank account. You will also be charged interest, but the late-payment penalty will be half of the usual rate (1/4% instead of 1/2%) if you file your return by the due date (including extensions).

    If any of the following occur, the installment agreement may terminate, causing all of your taxes to become due immediately: the information you provided to the IRS in applying for the agreement proves inaccurate or incomplete; you miss an installment; you fail to pay another tax liability when it is due; the IRS believes that its collection of the tax involved is in jeopardy; or you fail to provide an update regarding your financial condition when the IRS makes a reasonable request for you to do so.

    • Pension Plans – Tapping into one’s pension plan or IRA should be a very last resort, not only because it degrades your future retirement but also because of the potential tax implications. Generally, except for Roth IRAs, the funds in retirement accounts are pretax; as a result, when withdrawn, they become taxable. If you are under 59½, any such distribution will also be subject to the 10% early-withdrawal penalty. Federal tax, state tax (if applicable), and this penalty can chew up a hefty amount of the distribution, which may be too high a price to pay.

    A Final Word of Caution – Ignoring your filing obligation only makes matters worse, and doing so can become very expensive. It can lead to the IRS collection process, which can include attachments, liens or even the seizure and sale of your property. In many cases, these tax nightmares can be avoided by taking advantage of the solutions discussed above. If you cannot pay your taxes, please call Dagley & Co. to discuss your options.

     

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  • Tax Filing Deadline Is Around the Corner

    29 March 2017
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    REMINDER: April 18, 2017 is the due date to file your return(s), pay any taxes owed, or file for a six-month extension. It is important to know that with this extension you will end up paying the tax you estimate to be due.

    In addition, this deadline also applies to the following:

    • Tax year 2016 balance-due payments – Taxpayers that are filing extensions are cautioned that the filing extension is an extension to file, NOT an extension to pay a balance due.  Late payment penalties and interest will be assessed on any balance due, even for returns on extension.  Taxpayers anticipating a balance due will need to estimate this amount and include their payment with the extension request.
    • Tax year 2016 contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA – April 18 is the last day contributions for 2016 can be made to either a Roth or traditional IRA, even if an extension is filed.
    • Individual estimated tax payments for the first quarter of 2017 – Taxpayers, especially those who have filed for an extension to file their 2016 return, are cautioned that the first installment of the 2017 estimated taxes are due on April 18.  If you are on extension and anticipate a refund, all or a portion of the refund can be allocated to this quarter’s payment on the final return when it is filed at a later date. If the refund won’t be enough to fully cover the April 18 installment, you may need to make a payment with the April 18 voucher. Please call this office for any questions.
    • Individual refund claims for tax year 2013 – The regular three-year statute of limitations expires on April 18 for the 2013 tax return.  Thus, no refund will be granted for a 2013 original or amended return that is filed after April 18. Caution: The statute does not apply to balances due for unfiled 2013 returns.

    If Dagley  & Co. is holding up the completion of your returns because of missing information, please forward that information as quickly as possible in order to meet the April 18 deadline.  Keep in mind that the last week of tax season is very hectic, and your returns may not be completed if you wait until the last minute.  If it is apparent that the information will not be available in time for the April 18 deadline, then let the office know right away so that an extension request, and 2017 estimated tax vouchers if needed, may be prepared.

    If your returns have not yet been completed, please call Dagley & Co. right away so that we can schedule an appointment and/or file an extension if necessary.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Consequences of Filing Married Separate

    27 March 2017
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    Married? Thinking about NOT filing a joint return with your spouse? Most likely, you will utilize the ‘married filing separate’, or MFS, filing status. With this, you must be aware that there are special tax codes involved that married individuals CANNOT benefit by filing as MFS. Dagley & Co. describes some of the most frequent issues we’ve encountered  when making the choice of the MFS filing status. (Please note, all dollar amounts are those for 2017)

    Joint & Several Liability – When married taxpayers file joint returns, both spouses are responsible for the tax on that return. What this means is that one spouse may be held liable for all the tax due on a return, even if the other spouse earned all the income on that return. In some marriages, this becomes an issue and causes the spouses to decide to file separately. In other cases, especially second marriages, the couple may want to keep their finances separate. Unless all the income, exemptions, credits and deductions are divided equally, which usually happens in community property states, this generally causes the incomes to be distorted and could easily push one of the spouses into a higher tax bracket and create a greater combined tax than filing jointly. Being in a separate property state, where each spouse claims their own earnings, can also create an uneven allocation of income and a higher tax bracket for one of the spouses.

    Exemptions – Taxpayers are allowed a $4,050 tax exemption for each of their dependents. However, the $4,050 allowance cannot be divided between the MFS filers, so only one of the filers can claim a dependent’s exemption, and where there are multiple dependents, the spouses would need to allocate the exemptions between them.

    Itemizing Deductions – To prevent taxpayers from filing MFS and one spouse taking advantage of itemized deductions and the other utilizing the standard deduction, the tax regulations require both to itemize if one of them does.

    Social Security Income – When filing a joint return, Social Security (SS) income is not taxable until the modified AGI (MAGI) – which is regular AGI (without Social Security income) plus 50% of the couple’s Social Security income plus tax-exempt interest income and plus certain other infrequently encountered additions – exceeds a taxable threshold of $32,000. However, for married taxpayers who have lived together at any time during the year and are filing married separate, the threshold is zero, generally making more of the Social Security income taxable.

    Section 179 Deduction – Businesses can elect to expense, instead of depreciate, up to $510,000 of business purchases, generally including equipment, certain qualified leasehold property and off-the-shelf computer software. The $510,000 cap is reduced by $1 for every $1 that the qualifying purchases exceed $2,030,000 for the year. Married taxpayers are treated as one taxpayer for purposes of the Section 179 expense limit. Thus, they generally must split the limit equally unless they can agree upon and elect an unequal split.

    Special Passive Loss Allowance – Passive losses are generally losses from business and rental activities in which a taxpayer does not materially participate. Those losses are not allowed except to offset income from other passive activities. Rental property is an example of a passive activity, and for lower-income taxpayers, a special allowance permits taxpayers who are actively involved in the rental activity to currently deduct a loss of up to $25,000 if their AGI does not exceed $100,000. That $25,000 special loss allowance phases out by 50 cents for each $1 of AGI over $100,000 and is completely eliminated when the AGI reaches $150,000. When filing separately, this special allowance is not allowed unless the spouses live apart the entire year, and then the allowance is reduced to $12,500 each.

    Traditional IRA Deduction Phase-Out – If a married taxpayer filing jointly is participating in a qualified employer pension plan, the deductibility of a traditional IRA contribution is phased out ratably for an AGI between $99,000 and $119,000. If the taxpayers file married separate, the phase-out begins at $0 if the taxpayer participates in their employer’s plan, and when the AGI reaches $10,000, no traditional IRA deduction is allowed. So little, if any, IRA deduction will be available to such an MFS filer.

    Roth IRA Contribution Phase-Out – Taxpayers may choose to contribute to a non-deductible Roth IRA. However, Roth IRA contributions are ratably phased out for higher-income married filing jointly taxpayers with an AGI between $186,000 and $196,000. For a married taxpayer filing MFS status, that AGI phase-out range drops to $0 through $9,999, virtually eliminating the possibility of a Roth contribution.

    Coverdell Education Accounts – Taxpayers are allowed to contribute up to $2,000 per beneficiary to a Coverdell education savings account annually. However for joint filers, the amount that can be contributed ratably phases out for AGIs between $190,000 and $220,000. For married filing separate taxpayers, the phase-out is half that amount, from $95,000 to $110,000.

    Education Tax Credits – Taxpayers are allowed a tax credit, called the American Opportunity Tax Credit, of up to $2,500 per family member enrolled at least half-time in college for the cost of tuition and qualified expenses. This credit phases out ratably for higher-income married taxpayers filing jointly with an AGI between $160,000 and $180,000.

    There is a second higher-education credit called the Lifetime Learning Credit, which provides a credit of up to $2,000 per family. This credit also phases out ratably for higher-income married taxpayers filing jointly with an AGI between $112,000 and $132,000.

    However, neither credit is allowed for married filing separate taxpayers.

    Higher Education Interest – Taxpayers can take a deduction of up to $2,500 for student loan interest paid on higher-education loans. Like other benefits, it is phased out for higher-income married taxpayers filing jointly, in this instance when the AGI is between $135,000 and $165,000. It is not allowed at all for taxpayers filing as married separate.

    Education Exclusion For U.S. Savings Bond Interest – Although not frequently encountered, interest from certain U.S. Savings Bonds can be excluded if used to pay higher-education expenses for the taxpayers and their dependents. The exclusion phases out for married taxpayers with an AGI between $117,250 and $147,250. This deduction is not allowed at all when filing married separate.

    Premium Tax Credit – For married taxpayers who qualify for the PTC (health insurance subsidy) under Obamacare, if they file married separate, they may be required to repay the subsidy.

    Earned Income Tax Credit – This is a refundable tax credit that rewards lower-income taxpayers for working and can be as much $6,318 for families with three or more qualifying children. Taxpayers filing as married separate are not qualified for this credit.

    Child Care Credit – If both spouses work and incur child care expenses, they qualify for the child care credit. However, for those married filing separate, the credit is not allowed.

    Halved Deductions & Credits – Many of the deductions and credits allowed to a married couple filing jointly are cut in half for the married filing separate filing status. They include:

    • Standard Deduction
    • Standard Deduction Phase-Out
    • Alternative Minimum Tax Exemptions
    • Alternative Minimum Tax Exemptions Phase-Outs
    • Child Tax Credit Phase-Out

    Head of Household Filing StatusWhere a married couple is not filing jointly, one or both spouses may qualify for the more beneficial Head of Household (HH) filing status rather than having to file using the MFS status. A married individual may use the HH status if they lived apart from their spouse for at least the last six months of the year and paid more than one-half of the cost of maintaining his or her home as a principal place of abode for more than one-half the year of a child, stepchild or eligible foster child for whom the taxpayer may claim a dependency exemption. (A non-dependent child only qualifies if the custodial parent gave written consent to allow the dependency to the non-custodial parent or if the non-custodial parent has the right to claim the dependency under a pre-’85 divorce agreement.)

    As you can see, there are a significant number of issues that need to be considered when making the decision to use the married filing separate status. And these are not all of them, but only the more significant ones. The filing status decision should not be made nonchalantly, as it can have significant impact on your taxes. Please contact Dagley & Co. for assistance in making that crucial decision.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Use Direct Deposit for Faster Refunds

    1 March 2017
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    Did you know, direct deposit is the quickest way to obtain your refund? At Dagley & Co., we don’t recommend waiting around for your paper check in the mail. We’ve broke down the crucial info to be aware of when it comes to finally receiving your hard-earned tax refund:

    • Speed—When combining e-file with direct deposit, the IRS will likely issue your refund in no more than 21 days.
    • Security—Direct Deposit offers the most secure method of obtaining your refund. There is no check to lose. Each year, the U.S. Post Office returns thousands of refund checks to the IRS as un-deliverable mail.

    Direct deposit eliminates un-deliverable mail and is also the best way to guard against having a tax refund check stolen.

    • Easy—Simply provide this office with your bank routing number and account number when we prepare your return and you’ll receive your refund far more quickly than you would by check.
    • Convenience— The money goes directly into your bank account. You won’t have to make a special trip to the bank to deposit the money yourself.
    • Eligible Financial Accounts – You can direct your refund to any of your checking or savings accounts with a U.S. financial institution as long as your financial institution accepts direct deposits for that type of account and you provide valid routing and account numbers. Examples of savings accounts include: passbook savings, individual development accounts, individual retirement arrangements, health savings accounts, Archer MSAs, and Coverdell education savings accounts.
    • Multiple Options—You can deposit your refund into up to three financial accounts that are in your name or your spouse’s name if it is a joint account. You can’t have part of the refund paid by paper check and part by Direct Deposit. With the split refund option, taxpayers can divide their refunds among as many as three checking or savings accounts at up to three different U.S. financial institutions. Check with your bank or other financial institution to make sure your Direct Deposit will be accepted.
    • Deposit Can’t Be to a Third Party’s Bank Account—To protect taxpayers from scammers, direct deposit tax refunds can only be deposited into an account or accounts owned by the taxpayer.  Therefore, only provide your own account information and not account information belonging to a third party.
    • Fund Your IRA—You can even direct a refund into your IRA or myRA account.

    To set up a direct deposit, you will need to provide the bank routing number (9 digits) and your account number for each account into which you wish to make a deposit. Be sure to have these numbers available at your appointment.

     

    For more information regarding direct deposit of your tax refund and the split refund option, Dagley & Co. would be happy to discuss your options with you at your tax appointment.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • February 2017 Business Due Dates

    6 February 2017
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    Are you a business owner? Be sure to follow these specific due dates regarding payroll, taxes, social security, etc. Remember: February is the shortest month of the year so we recommend keeping track of all due dates, and always plan ahead!

    February 10 – Non-Payroll Taxes

    File Form 945 to report income tax withheld for 2016 on all non-payroll items. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the year in full and on time.

    February 10 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    File Form 941 for the fourth quarter of 2016. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time.

    February 10 – Certain Small Employers

    File Form 944 to report Social Security and Medicare taxes and withheld income tax for 2016. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the year in full and on time.

    February 10 – Federal Unemployment Tax

    File Form 940 for 2016. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the year in full and on time.

    February 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in January.

    February 15 – Non-Payroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in January.

    February 28 – Payers of Gambling Winnings

    File Form 1096, Annual Summary and Transmittal of U.S. Information Returns, along with Copy A of all the Forms W-2G you issued for 2016. If you file Forms W-2G electronically, your due date for filing them with the IRS will be extended to March 31. The due date for giving the recipient these forms was  January 31.

    February 28 – Informational Returns Filing Due

    File government copies of information returns (Form 1099) and transmittal Forms 1096 for certain payments you made during 2016, other than the 1099-MISCs that were due January 31. There are different 1099 forms for different types of payments.

    February 28 – Large Food and Beverage Establishment Employers

    File Form 8027, Employer’s Annual Information Return of Tip Income and Allocated Tips. Use Form 8027-T, Transmittal of Employer’s Annual Information Return of Tip Income and Allocated Tips, to summarize and transmit Forms 8027 if you have more than one establishment. If you file Forms 8027 electronically, your due date for filing them with the IRS will be extended to March 31.

    February 28 – Farmers and Fishermen

    File your 2016 income tax return (Form 1040) and pay any tax due. However, you have until April 18 to file if you paid your 2016 estimated tax by January 17, 2016.

     

    Contact Dagley & Co. with any questions or comments regarding this month’s due dates.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Missed a 60-Day Rollover? There May Be Relief

    26 January 2017
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    Miss a 60-day rollover? According to the IRA, the acceptable reasons for missing include: An error was committed by the financial institution, the distribution check was misplaced and never cashed, the distribution was mistakenly deposited into an account that the taxpayer thought was an eligible retirement plan, the taxpayer’s principal residence was severely damaged, a member of the taxpayer’s family died, the taxpayer or a member of the taxpayer’s family was seriously ill, the taxpayer was incarcerated, restrictions were imposed by a foreign country, a postal error occurred, or the distribution was made on account of an IRS levy, and the proceeds of the levy have been returned to the taxpayer. If you, or someone you know, fall into any of these situations, as a taxpayer, you can take a distribution from an IRA or other qualified retirement plan and if they roll it over within 60 days they can avoid taxation on the distributed amount.

    Financial Institution Error – Where the failure to meet the deadline is due to financial institution error, the IRS provides an automatic waiver.

    Private Letter Ruling (PLR) – Where automatic waiver does not apply, and the taxpayer feels there is a legitimate reason for missing the 60-day rollover requirement, the taxpayer can request relief though a PLR where the IRS reviews the reason for missing the 60-day rollover period and either allows or denies relief from the 60-day requirement. However, the IRS will charge the taxpayer requesting the PLR a user fee of $10,000, which negates the purpose of a PLR except in cases of very large rollover amounts.

    New Self-Certification Procedure – The IRS recently announced a new certification procedure that allows a taxpayer who misses the 60-day time limit for properly rolling the amount into another retirement plan or IRA to make a written certification to a plan administrator or an IRA trustee that a contribution satisfies one of the acceptable reasons, and therefore is eligible for a waiver of the 60-day rule.

    Please remember: This provision does not apply to required minimum distributions for taxpayers who are 70.5 years of age and over.). Also, taxpayers are limited to one IRA-to-IRA rollover per year.

    The rollover must be completed as soon as practicable after the reason(s) listed above no longer prevent the taxpayer from making the contribution. This requirement is deemed to be satisfied if the contribution is made within 30 days after the reason(s) no longer prevent the taxpayer from making the contribution.

    This procedure does not apply where the IRS previously denied a waiver request for the same missed rollover.

    The IRS provides a model letter that can be used to make the self-certification. Please call Dagley & Co. if you need a copy of the letter, have questions, or need assistance related to a missed 60-day rollover.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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