• Deducting Convention Expenses

    26 April 2017
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    For the most part, an individual’s travel expenses from attending conventions or seminars can be deducted (provided that attendance benefits the taxpayer’s trade or business). But, the following travel expenses cannot be deducted: family members’ travel expenses, or expenses from attending investment, political, social or other types of meetings not related to the taxpayer’s trade or business. The entire cost of transportation and lodging, plus 50% of the meal expenses, is deductible for meetings held within the North American area. For a detailed list of areas within North America, please consult IRS Publication 463.

    Meetings Outside the North American Area – Deducting travel expenses for a convention or meeting outside the North American area has requirements:

    • The meeting must be directly related to the taxpayer’s trade or business (whereas meetings within the North American area need only benefit the taxpayer’s trade or business), and
    • It must be reasonable to hold the meeting outside the North American area. There is no specific definition of “reasonable” for this purpose, which places the burden of proof on the taxpayer. Considerations include the meeting’s purpose and activities and the location of the meeting sponsors’ homes.

    Even if the above requirements are met, the amount of deduction allowed depends upon the primary purpose of the trip and on the time spent on nonbusiness activities:

    (1) If the entire time is devoted to business, all ordinary and necessary travel expenses are deductible.

    (2) If the travel is primarily for vacation and only a few hours are spent attending professional seminars, none of the expenses incurred in traveling to and from the business location are deductible.

    (3) If, during a business trip, personal activities take place at, near or beyond the business destination, then the expenses incurred in traveling to and from the business location have to be appropriately allocated between the business and nonbusiness expenses.

    (4) If the travel is for a period of one week or less, or if less than 25% of the total time is spent on nonbusiness activities (on a day-by-day basis), then the travel deductions are treated the same as they would be for travel within the North American area.

    Meetings Held On Cruise Ships – When a convention or meeting is held on a cruise ship and is directly related to a taxpayer’s trade or business, the taxpayer is limited to $2,000 per year in deductions for expenses from attending such conventions, seminars, or similar meetings. All ships that sail are considered cruise ships. The following rules also apply:

    • The cruise ship must be registered in the United States.
    • All of the cruise ship’s ports of call must be in the United States or its possessions.

    If you have questions related to the deductibility of expenses from conventions and meetings or from foreign travel, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Don’t Be Scammed By Fake Charities

    20 March 2017
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    Each year, the IRS publishes its list of the “dirty dozen” tax scams. This list is a variety of common scams that taxpayers may encounter anytime. Don’t fall prey!

    Urgent appeals for aid – whether in person, over the phone, by mail, via e-mail, on a website, or through a social networking site – may not be on the up-and-up. Fraudsters pop up after natural disasters such as earthquakes and floods to try to coax people into making donations that will go into the fraudsters’ pockets – not to help victims of the disaster.

    Unfortunately, legitimate charities face competition from fraudsters, so if you are thinking about giving to a charity with which you are not familiar, do your research so that you can avoid the swindlers who are trying to take advantage of your generosity. Here are tips to help make sure that your charitable contributions actually go to the cause that you support:

    • Donate to charities that you know and trust. Be alert for charities that seem to have sprung up overnight in connection with current events.
    • Ask if a caller is a paid fundraiser, who he/she works for, and what percentages of your donation go to the charity and to the fundraiser. If you don’t get clear answers – or if you don’t like the answers you get – consider donating to a different organization.
    • Don’t give out personal or financial information — such as your credit card or bank account number – unless you know for sure that the charity is reputable.
    • Never send cash. You can’t be sure that the organization will receive your donation, and you won’t have a record for tax purposes.
    • Never wire money to someone who claims to be from a charity. Scammers often request donations to be wired because wiring money is like sending cash: Once you send it, you can’t get it back.
    • If a donation request comes from a charity that claims to help a local community group (for example, police or firefighters), ask members of that group if they have heard of the charity and if it is actually providing financial support.
    • Check out the charity’s reputation using the Better Business Bureau’s (BBB) Wise Giving Alliance, Charity Navigator, or Charity Watch.

    Remember that, to deduct a charitable contribution on your tax return, the donation must be to a legitimate charity. Contributions may only be deducted if they are to religious, charitable, scientific, educational, literary, or other institutions that are incorporated or recognized as organizations by the IRS. Sometimes, these organizations are referred to as 501(c)(3) organizations (after the code section that allows them to be tax-exempt). Gifts to federal, state, or local government, qualifying veterans’ or fraternal organizations, and certain nonprofit cemetery companies also may be deductible. Gifts to other kinds of nonprofits, such as business leagues, social clubs, and homeowner’s associations, as well as gifts to individuals, cannot be deducted.

    To claim a cash contribution, you must be able to document that contribution with a bank record, receipt, or a written communication from the qualified organization; this record must include the name of the qualified organization, the date of the contribution, and the amount of the contribution. Valid types of bank records include canceled checks, bank or credit union statements, and credit card statements. In addition, to deduct a contribution of $250 or more, you must have certain payroll deduction records or an acknowledgment of your contribution from the qualified organization.

    Be aware that, to claim a charitable contribution, you must also itemize your deductions. It may also be beneficial for you to group your deductions in a single year and then to skip deductions in the next year. Please contact Dagley & Co. if you have questions related to the tax benefits associated with charitable giving for your particular tax situation.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Didn’t File in 2013? Last Chance to Get Your Refund

    13 March 2017
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    Have not yet filed your 2013 federal tax return? If not, you need to act quickly because your return must be filed by April 18, 2017. Otherwise, you forfeit your refund, and the money becomes the property of the U.S. Treasury.

    The IRS estimates that more than 1 million taxpayers have not filed their 2013 tax returns and that more than $1 billion of unclaimed refunds are available for those taxpayers. The IRS estimates that these taxpayers will have an average refund of $763.

    By failing to file a return, people stand to lose more than just refunds for taxes withheld or paid during 2013. In addition, many low- and moderate-income workers did not claim the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which helps individuals and families with incomes below certain thresholds. For unmarried individuals in 2013, these thresholds were $46,227 for those with three or more children, $43,038 for those with two children, $37,870 for those with one child, and $14,340 for those with no children. Each amount is $5,340 more for married joint filers. In addition, parents who are eligible to claim the refundable portion of the child tax credit and the American Opportunity Tax Credit (education tax credit) will forfeit those benefits if they don’t file a return.

    When filing a 2013 return, the law requires that the return be properly addressed, mailed and postmarked by April 18th. There is no late-filing penalty for those who qualify for a refund.

    As a reminder, taxpayers seeking a 2013 refund should know that their checks will be held if they have not also filed tax returns for 2011 and 2012. In addition, their refunds will first be applied to any amounts that they still owe to the IRS and may be used to offset unpaid child support or past-due federal debts caused by student loans, repayment of unemployment compensation and state taxes owed.

    Contact Dagley & Co. with any questions, or make your tax appointment today.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Tax Deductions for Owner-Operator Truckers

    8 March 2017
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    If you are in the trucking industry, many times your tax situation is unique. More specifically, if you are an “owner-operator” in the trucking industry, you have many tax benefits to take advantage of. You are allowed special allowances for meals and you are allowed very large write-offs for the tractors, trucks and other equipment needed to run your business. On the other hand, you must pay for permits and any additional taxes that may be involved. Dagley & Co. realizes you may also have special reporting requirements on your tax return, so if you or someone you know have any questions, feel free to reach out to us. To help with this, the following is an overview of tax issues that may apply to owner-operators:

    • Meals Away from Home – As an owner-operator trucker, you may deduct the actual cost of your meals; this requires you to save your receipts. Alternatively, you can deduct the IRS’ standard meal allowance for the transportation industry, using your logbooks as substantiation. For 2016 and 2017, amount for meals and incidental expenses is $63 per day. Whether you use the actual-expense method or the standard method, only 80% of the total for the year is deductible. Even though only 80% is deductible, keep track all expenses for tax purposes, as the 80% adjustment is made during the tax-return preparation process

    Meals are deductible if you need to stop for substantial rest in order to properly perform your duties while traveling on business.

    • Lodging – Lodging expenses are deductible. Unfortunately, there is no standard allowance for lodging; thus, you must keep a receipt for each lodging expense. Generally, to deduct lodging expenses, you must be away from home overnight.

    One issue that could result in the disallowance of lodging and other travel expenses is not having a regular place of business or place of residence. In this case, you would be considered an itinerant (or transient), and your home for tax purposes would be wherever you work. As an itinerant, you would not be able to claim a deduction for lodging and meals because you would never be considered to be away from home.

    Other On-The-Road Expenses – Generally, to be deductible, items must be both ordinary and necessary to your job. For truckers, these expenses include laundry (when away overnight), gloves, logbooks, maps, cell phones, CB radios, tools, safety gear, cargo straps, and any other incurred expenses that are ordinary and necessary in the business. Generally, receipts are required, but if the business expense is less than $75, a receipt is not necessary, provided that you record all of the information in a diary in a timely manner.

    • Vehicle (Tractor) Cost Write-Offs – The current tax code provides several options for writing off the cost of a vehicle, including immediate expensing of up to $510,000 (as of 2017) during the year the property is put into service; first-year depreciation equal to 50% of the vehicle’s cost; normal deprecation; or a combination of all three. These options allow owner-operators to pick almost any amount of write-off to best suit their particular circumstances. For normal depreciation, the IRS allows a recovery period of 3 years for over-the-road tractor units and of 5 years for trailers, trailer-mounted containers and heavy-duty trucks (13,000 pounds or more).
    • Vehicle (Tractor) Operating Expenses – Of course, vehicle operating expenses – including fuel, licenses, taxes, maintenance and insurance – are deductible. Depending on the nature and cost, some expenses may have to be depreciated.
    • General Business Expenses – Owner-operators can usually deduct the following expenses: trucking-industry and business-related subscriptions, association dues, computers and software, Internet service, cleaning supplies, business interest, office supplies, DOT physicals, drug testing, sleep apnea studies, postage and other business-related expenses.
    • Heavy Highway Vehicle Use Tax – The heavy highway vehicle use tax (Form 2290) applies to highway vehicles weighing 55,000 pounds or more. The due date for this form is based on when (during the annual filing period) the vehicle is first used on a public highway. For the period of July 1, 2016, through June 30, 2017, Form 2290 is due by the end of August 2016 for vehicles first used on a public highway in July 2016. For vehicles first used on a public highway after July, the use tax is prorated, and the form is due by last day of the month following the month of first use. See when to file for more details. The use tax ranges from $100 to $550 per vehicle for a full year, depending on the vehicle’s weight. You will need to have an employer ID number to file the Form 2290; your Social Security number cannot be used as the ID number.
    • Subcontractor Payments – If you paid an individual for services during the year, that person was most likely a subcontractor. Payments of $600 or more to subcontractors must be reported to the government by filing Form 1099-MISC. This form requires the subcontractor’s name, address and tax ID number as well as the payment amount. There are penalties for failing to file this form, for filing it late and for filing it without the tax ID number. All these penalties can be avoided by (1) having contractors complete Form W-9 before you pay them and (2) filing the 1099-MISC forms by January 31 of the subsequent year.

    Some expenses are not deductible; those with limited knowledge of trucker expenses may take these deductions, potentially triggering IRS inquiries and audits. One example is deducting the cost of street clothing. For clothing, only the cost of uniforms or protective clothing is allowed as a deduction.

    Another example is deducting lost income:

    • For time you spend repairing or maintaining your own equipment,
    • As a result of a deadhead, or
    • Because of downtime.

    Lost income is already accounted for, as you do not have to report the income on your tax return in the first place.

    If you have any questions related to trucking and taxes, please call Dagley & Co. This office is knowledgeable regarding the drivers’ and owner-operators’ tax issues, and are here to help you eliminate the stress of accounting and tax filing. Our phone number is 202-417-6640.

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  • March 2017 Business Due Dates

    27 February 2017
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    At Dagley & Co., we’ve compiled a list of due dates for your business. Contact us at (202) 417-6640 with any questions.

    March 15 –  Partnerships

    File a 2016-calendar year return (Form 1065). Provide each partner with a copy of Schedule K-1 (Form 1065), Partner’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc., or a substitute Schedule K-1. If you want an automatic 6-month extension of time to file the return and provide Schedules K-1 or substitute Schedules K-1 to the partners, file Form 7004. Then, file Form 1065 and provide the K-1s to the partners by September 15.

    March 15 –  S-Corporation Election

    File Form 2553, Election by a Small Business Corporation, to choose to be treated as an S corporation beginning with calendar year 2017. If Form 2553 is filed late, S treatment will begin with calendar year 2018.

    March 15 –  Electing Large Partnerships

    File a 2016-calendar year return (Form 1065-B) and provide each partner with a copy of Schedule K-1 (Form 1065-B), Partner’s Share of Income (Loss) From an Electing Large Partnership, or a substitute Schedule K-1. This due date applies for K-1s even if the partnership requests an extension of time to file the Form 1065-B by filing Form 7004.

    March 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in February.

    March 15 – Non-Payroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in February.
    March 31 – Electronic Filing of Forms 1098, 1099 and W-2G

    If you file Forms 1098, 1099 (other than 1099-MISC with an amount in box 7), or W-2G electronically with the IRS, this is the final due date. This due date applies only if you file electronically (not paper forms). Otherwise, January 31 or February 28 was the due date, depending on the form filed. The due date for giving the recipient these forms was January 31.

    March 31 – Large Food and Beverage Establishment Employers 

    If you file Forms 8027 for 2016 electronically with the IRS, this is the final due date. This due date applies only if you file electronically. Otherwise, February 28 is the due date.
     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Don’t Overlook Standard Mileage Rate Add-Ons

    15 February 2017
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    Business owners and employees often use the standard mileage rate when taking a deduction for the business use of their vehicle. The standard mileage rate is determined annually by the IRS by using data based on the prior year’s costs. For 2017, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) is 53.5 cents per mile for business miles driven, down from 54 cents for 2016. Operating expenses include:

    • Gasoline
    • Oil
    • Lubrication
    • Repairs
    • Vehicle registration fees
    • Insurance
    • Straight line depreciation (or lease payments)

    What business owners using the standard mileage rate frequently overlook is that parking and tolls, as well as state and local property taxes paid for the vehicle and attributable to business use, may be deducted in addition to the standard mileage rate.

    Regardless of whether the standard mileage rate or actual expense method is used, a self-employed taxpayer may also deduct the business use portion of interest paid on an auto loan on their Schedule C. However, employees may not deduct interest paid on a consumer car loan.

    If you have questions related to taking a tax deduction for the business use of your vehicle, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • IRS Clamps Down on Tax Credits

    9 February 2017
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    Tax fraud is currently a huge issue which has cost the government billions of tax dollars. New laws are taking effect that clamp down on individuals who have fraudulently claimed the American Opportunity Tax Credit (AOTC), the Child Tax Credit (CTC) or the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Details on these credits are as follows:

    • The AOTC is the college tuition credit for low-income families that provides a credit for each eligible student equal to 100% of the first $2,000 and 25% of the next $2,000 spent on college tuition and related expenses; the maximum credit is $2,500, of which 40% is refundable. The credit is phased out depending on income.
    • The CTC is a tax credit of $1,000 for each of the taxpayer’s qualifying dependent children. A portion of the credit that is not used to offset the taxpayer’s tax liability can be refundable; the refund is based in part on the number children in the family and in part on the taxpayer’s earned income. This credit may also be phased out for higher-income taxpayers.
    • The EITC is a refundable credit awarded to low-income taxpayers who work. The credit is based on the amount of the taxpayer’s income that comes from working as well as on total income and on number of children. In 2016, this credit can be worth as much as $6,269.

    We have your rundown of some of the new provisions that the government has put in place to defend against fraud:

    Retroactive Claims – Individuals are now prevented from retroactively claiming the AOTC, CTC or EITC if the individual, dependent child or student for whom the credit is claimed does not have a taxpayer identification number (TIN). In other words, the TIN must be issued prior to the due date for filing the original return in the tax year for which the credit is claimed; the IRS will deny the credit if the TIN is not issued on time. In most cases, the TIN is a Social Security number.

    Disallowance Periods – When a taxpayer improperly claims the AOTC, CTC or EITC (either fraudulently or recklessly), he or she will be barred from claiming that credit for a period of time. The disallowance periods are 10 years for fraud and 2 years for reckless or intentional disregard of rules and regulations.

    Preparer Due Diligence Requirements – In the past, paid tax preparers have always abided by a set of due-diligence guidelines for EITC qualification before including that credit on any return that they prepared. These due-diligence requirements have been expanded to include the CTC and the AOTC. This adds additional work for paid preparers and increases their liability for errors, as each disallowed credit could be  subject to a $510 preparer penalty.

    1098-T Required to Claim Education Credits – Education credits can no longer be claimed unless the taxpayer includes the employer identification number of the educational institution to which the tuition was paid. This number, as well as the other information needed to determine the credit, can be found on the Form 1098-T (Tuition Statement) issued by the educational institution. The new rules require that the taxpayer (or the dependent who is a student) receive a 1098-T form to claim the credit, although some exceptions are provided.

    Refunds that Include the EITC or CTC Will Be Purposely Delayed – Refunds from returns that include an EITC or a refundable CTC will not be issued prior to February 15th, which gives the IRS additional time to verify the validity of the credit claims and to match them against the taxpayers’ income amounts and the informational returns that are filed with the IRS to verify tuition.

    If you have questions related to any of the foregoing safeguards, the delayed refunds or the credits themselves, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Along with Tax Season Come the Scams; Don’t Be a Victim

    19 January 2017
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    For those of you who are not aware, with tax season also comes a lot of scams. These “scammers” try to steel your identity to file returns under your personal Social Security number. Be on the lookout for scam emails, phone calls or texts. These scammers will say they are from the IRS or that they are your state’s tax agent. Never be intimidated by what these people say, and NEVER agree to send them money or your personal information (including birth date, address or full name). Always question twice before you send anything over the internet, through the mail, or on the phone.

    Dagley & Co. has provided your with a variety of plots that have been employed in the past:

    You should be aware that the IRS never initiates contact in any way other than by U.S. Mail. So, if you receive a phone call from out of the blue demanding payment, you can be assured it is a scam. Simply hang up the phone without providing any information. If you receive an email from the IRS, do not click on embedded links or attachments. That could cause malware to be installed on your computer, allowing scammers to access your computer. The first thing you should do is call this office.

    Additionally, it is important for taxpayers to know that the IRS:

    • Never asks for credit card, debit card, or prepaid card information over the telephone.
    • Never insists that taxpayers use a specific payment method to pay tax obligations.
    • Never requests immediate payment over the telephone.
    • Will not take enforcement action immediately following a phone conversation. Taxpayers usually receive prior written notification of IRS enforcement actions involving IRS tax liens or levies.

    Email Scams & Phishing – Every tax season, the scammers become very active. They create bogus emails disguised as authentic emails from the IRS, your bank, or your credit card company, none of which ever request information that way. They are trying to trick you into divulging personal and financial information that they can use to invade your bank accounts, make charges against your credit card, or pretend to be you to file phony tax returns or apply for loans or credit cards. Always be skeptical! If the email is related to taxes, call this office before doing anything. If it is supposedly from your credit card company, your bank, or another financial institution, call the organization to verify the authenticity of the email.

    One scam last year was an email sent to taxpayers requesting that they click on a link in the email to verify their identity before their tax refund could be released. The link took them to the ID thief’s website, made to look like the IRS’s, where victims entered their names, SSNs, and birthdates. Others used the same scheme, pretending to be an individual’s bank or credit card company.

    Phone Scams – Very aggressive scammers will call, claiming to be an IRS agent, and tell the person answering the call that they owe money that must be paid immediately or their home will be seized, their wages will be attached, or even that they will be arrested. After threatening the victim with jail time or driver’s license revocation, the scammer hangs up. Soon, someone else calls back pretending to be from the local police or DMV, and the (rigged) caller ID supports their claim.

    These are frequently thieves from outside the U.S., and once the money is transferred, there is no chance of getting it back.

    ID Thieves – These rip-off artists file phony tax returns using stolen IDs and counterfeit W-2s and have the refunds directly deposited into their bank accounts, which they then clean out before the victim or the IRS discovers what happened. If the IRS rejects your return because a SSN on your return was previously used to file, that is a good indication your ID has been stolen, and you should contact this office for instructions on notifying the IRS. Once your ID has been compromised, the IRS will issue a special six-digit Identity Protection number that can be used in conjunction with your SSN to file your return.

    If your ID has been compromised, or you suspect it might have been, contact Dagley & Co. immediately so we can assist you in notifying the IRS, so that they block returns filed with your SSN but without the special six-digit filing number.

    If you have other questions, please give Dagley & Co. a call at (202) 417-6640.

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • New Form 1099 Filing Date

    9 January 2017
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    Did your business utilize an independent contractor in 2016? Did you pay him/her $600 or more during the calendar year? If so, you are required to issue him/her a Form 1099-MISC. The purpose of this form is to avoid penalties and the possibility of losing the deduction for his/her labor and expenses in an audit. Different from last year, the IRS moved up the filing due date to January 31, 2017.

    In addition to being used to report payments to independent contractors, Form 1099-MISC is also used to report payments made by a business for rents and royalties and to attorneys for legal services, among others. If there are no independent contractor payments to report, the 2016 1099-MISC issued for other payments continues to be due to the IRS by the normal due date of February 28, 2017. However, where both independent contractor and other payments are being reported, the January 31 due date should be observed so that late filing penalties are avoided regarding the independent contractor payments.

    It is not uncommon to have a repairman out early in the year, pay him less than $600, then use his services again later in the year and have the total for the year exceed the $599 limit. As a result, you may have overlooked getting the information from the individual that you need to file the 1099-MISCs for the year. Therefore, it is good practice to always have individuals who are not incorporated complete and sign an IRS Form W-9 the first time you engage them and before you pay them. Having a properly completed and signed Form W-9 for all independent contractors and service providers eliminates any oversights and protects you against IRS penalties and conflicts. If you have been negligent in the past about having the W-9s completed, it would be a good idea to establish a procedure for getting each non-corporate independent contractor and service provider to fill out a W-9 and return it to you going forward.

    IRS Form W-9, Request for Taxpayer Identification Number and Certification, is provided by the government as a means for you to obtain the data required to file 1099s for your vendors. It also provides you with verification that you have complied with the law in case the vendor gives you incorrect information. We highly recommend that you have potential vendors complete a Form W-9 before you engage in business with them. The W-9 is for your use only and is not submitted to the IRS.

    The penalty for failure to file the required informational returns is substantial and is $260 per informational return. The penalty is reduced to $50 if a correct but late information return is filed not later than the 30th day after the January 31, 2017, required filing date, or it is reduced to $100 for returns filed after the 30th day but no later than August 1, 2017. If you are required to file 250 or more information returns, you must file them electronically.

    Please note: To avoid penalties, all forms must be sent to the IRS by January 31, 2017.

    Dagley & Co. is here to prepare your 1099 for submission. We recommend using this 1099 worksheet  to provide us with the information needed to prepare your 1099.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • January 2017 Business Due Dates

    5 January 2017
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    Are you a business owner, or is it your job to take control of your company’s accounting department? Don’t be overwhelmed by the new year! We’ve compiled a list of important due dates for you to remember. We advise you to write these down or add them to your phone/computer calendar! The due dates are as follows:

    January 17 – Employer’s Monthly Deposit Due –

    If you are an employer and the monthly deposit rules apply, January 17 is the due date for you to make your deposit of Social Security, Medicare and withheld income tax for December 2016. This is also the due date for the non-payroll withholding deposit for December 2016 if the monthly deposit rule applies. Employment tax deposits must be made electronically (no paper coupons), except employers with a deposit liability under $2,500 for a return period may remit payments quarterly or annually with the return.

    January 31 – 1099-MISCs Due to Service Providers & the IRS –

    If you are a business or rental property owner and paid $600 or more to individuals (other than employees) as non-employee compensation during 2016, you are required to provide Form 1099 to those workers by January 31. “Non-employee compensation” can mean payments for services performed for your business or rental by an individual who is not your employee, commissions, professional fees and materials, prizes and awards for services provided, fish purchases for cash, and payments for an oil and gas working interest. In order to avoid a penalty, copies of the 1099s also need to be sent to the IRS by January 31, 2017*. The 1099s must be submitted on optically scan-able (OCR) forms. This firm prepares 1099s in OCR format for submission to the IRS with the 1096 submittal form. This service provides both recipient and file copies for your records. Please call this office for preparation assistance.

    *This due date for the IRS’ copy is one or two months earlier than in prior years and applies when you have paid non-employee compensation that is being reported in box 7 of the 1099-MISC.

    January 31 – Form 1098 and Other 1099s Due to Recipients – 

    Form 1098 (Mortgage Interest Statement) and Forms 1099, other than 1099-MISC, are also due to recipients by January 31. The IRS’ copy is not due until February 28, 2017, or March 31, 2017 if electronically filed. These 1099s may be reporting the following types of income:

    • Dividends and other corporate distributions
    • Interest
    • Amounts paid in real estate transactions
    • Rent
    • Royalties
    • Amounts paid in broker and barter exchange transactions
    • Payments to attorneys
    • Payments of Indian gaming profits to tribal members
    • Profit-sharing distributions
    • Retirement plan distributions
    • Original issue discount
    • Prizes and awards
    • Medical and health care payments
    • Debt cancellation (treated as payment to debtor)

     

    January 31 – Employers – W-2s Due to All Employees & the Government –

    All employers need to give copies of the W-2 form for 2016 to their employees. If an employee agreed to receive their W-2 form electronically, post it on a website and notify the employee of the posting. NEW DATE: W-2 Copy A and Transmittal Form W-3, whether filed electronically or by paper, are due January 31 to the Social Security Administration. This is a month earlier than in the past.

    January 31 –  File Form 941 and Deposit Any Un-Deposited Tax –

    File Form 941 for the fourth quarter of 2016. Deposit any un-deposited Social Security, Medicare and withheld income tax. (If your tax liability is less than $2,500, you can pay it in full with a timely filed return.) If you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time, you have until February 10 to file the return.

    January 31 – File Form 943 – 

    All farm employers should file Form 943 to report Social Security, Medicare taxes and withheld income tax for 2016. Deposit any un-deposited tax. (If your tax liability is less than $2,500, you can pay it in full with a timely filed return.) If you deposited the tax for the year in full and on time, you have until February 10 to file the return.

    January 31 – W-2G Due from Payers of Gambling Winnings –

    If you paid either reportable gambling winnings or withheld income tax from gambling winnings, give the winners their copies of the W-2G form for 2016.

    January 31 – File 2016 Return to Avoid Penalty for Not Making 4th Quarter Estimated Payment –

    If you file your prior year’s return and pay any tax due by this date, you need not make the 4th Quarter Estimated Tax Payment that was otherwise due earlier in January.

    January 31 – File Form 940 – Federal Unemployment Tax – 

    File Form 940 (or 940-EZ) for 2016. If your un-deposited tax is $500 or less, you can either pay it with your return or deposit it. If it is more than $500, you must deposit it. However, if you deposited the tax for the year in full and on time, you have until February 10 to file the return.

    January 31 – File Form 945 –

    File Form 945 to report income tax withheld for 20152016 on all non-payroll items, including back-up withholding and withholding on pensions, annuities, IRAs, gambling winnings, and payments of Indian gaming profits to tribal members. Deposit any un-deposited tax. (If your tax liability is less than $2,500, you can pay it in full with a timely filed return.) If you deposited the tax for the year in full and on time, you have until February 10 to file the return.

     

    As always, if you have any questions about the due dates above, please give Dagley & Co. a call at (202) 417-6640.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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