• QuickBooks Tip: Receiving Customer Payments

    5 May 2017
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    We’ve put together step-by-step instructions of how to receive payments from a customer using your QuickBooks account:

    QuickBooks was designed to make your daily accounting tasks easier, faster, and more accurate. If you’ve been using the software for a while, you’ve probably found that to be true. Some chores, of course, aren’t so enjoyable. Like paying bills. Reconciling your bank account. Or anything else that has the potential to reduce the balance in your checking accounts.

    The process of receiving customer payments is one of your more enjoyable responsibilities. You supplied a product or service that someone liked and purchased, and you’re getting the money due you.

    Depending on the situation, you’ll use one of multiple methods to record customer payments. Here’s a look at some of your options.

    A Familiar Screen

    If you’re like many businesses, you send invoices to customers to let them know what they owe and when their payment is due. So one of the most commonly used ways to record payments is by using the Receive Payments window. To open it, click the Receive Payments icon on the home page or click Customers | Receive Payments.

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    You’ll use QuickBooks’ Receive Payments screen when you record a payment made in response to an invoice.

    The first thing you’ll do, of course, is choose the correct customer by clicking the down arrow in the field to the right of RECEIVED FROM. The outstanding balance from that customer will appear in the upper right corner, and invoice information will be displayed in the table below. Enter the PAYMENT AMOUNT and make sure the DATE is correct. (The next field, REFERENCE #, changes to CHECK # only if the CHECK option is selected.)

    Next, you’ll need to ensure that the payment is applied to the right invoices. If it covers the whole amount due, there will be a checkmark in every row in the first column of the table. If not, QuickBooks will use the money received to pay off the oldest invoices first. To change this, click Un-Apply Payment in the icon bar and click in front of the correct rows to create checkmarks.

    Several Options

    You’ll then want to tell QuickBooks what payment method the customer is using. Four options are displayed. The possibilities that are visible here are:

    • CASH
    • CHECK
    • CREDIT DEBIT (A specific card type may be shown here if you’ve indicated the customer’s preferred payment method in his or her record.)
    • e-CHECK

    If the desired payment method isn’t included in those four, click the down arrow under MORE. If it’s still not there, click Add New Payment Method. This window will open:

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    The New Payment Method window

    Click OK. When you choose your new payment method from the list, a window opens containing fields for the card number and expiration date. Click Done after you’ve entered it, and you’ll be returned to the Receive Payments screen. If you’re satisfied with your work there, click Save & Close or Save & New.

    Haven’t gotten set up to accept credit and debit cards yet? We can get you going with a merchant account to make this possible. You’re likely to find that some customers pay faster with this option. Your customers will be able to click a link in an emailed invoice and make their payments.

    Instant Sales

    Depending on the type of business you have and its physical location, there may be times when customers will come in and buy something on the spot. You’ll need to give them a Sales Receipt. Click Create Sales Receipts on the home page or open the Customers menu and select Enter Sales Receipts to open this window:

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    The Enter Sales Receipts window

    You’ll complete this form much like you entered data in the fields of the Receive Payments window. As you can see, you can print the mail for the customer and/or email it.

    After all the hard work you’ve done to make your sales, the last thing you want to do is record a payment incorrectly so it isn’t processed and you don’t get paid. Though QuickBooks makes the mechanics of receiving payments simple enough, you still should understand the entire process involved in getting income into the correct accounts. Dagley & Co. is available to help with this and any other areas of QuickBooks.

     

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  • Can’t Pay Your Tax Liability?

    13 April 2017
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    on time

    Can’t pay your tax liability for 2016? We have the information you need to know:

    First, do not let your inability to pay your tax liability in full keep you from filing your tax return on time. If your return is not on time, you must still pay the “failure to file” penalty, which accrues at a rate of 5% per month on the amount of tax that you owe based on your return.

    If in doubt, you can delay the “failure to file” penalty for six months by filing an extension, but this still won’t keep you penalty free.

    Although an extension provides you with more time to file your actual return, it is not an extension of your payment date. If you do not pay the balance of your 2016 tax liability, you will be subject to the “failure to pay” penalty. This penalty accrues at the rate of 0.5% per month or partial month (up to a maximum of 25%) on the amount that you owe based on your return.

    If both penalties apply, the “failure to file” penalty drops to 4.5% per month or part thereof, so the total combined penalty remains 5%. The maximum combined penalty for the first five months is thus 25%. Thereafter, the “failure to pay” penalty will continue to increase at 1/2% per month for 45 more months (up to an additional 22.5%). Thus, the combined penalties can reach a total of 47.5% over time. Both of these penalties are in addition to the interest charges on the late payments.

    The bottom line is that, if you owe money, it is best to file your return on time even if you can’t pay the entire liability. That will minimize your penalties. Paying as much as you can with your return will further minimizing your penalties. By the way, neither the penalties nor the interest are tax-deductible.

    Possible Solutions – The following are possible ways to pay your tax liability when you don’t have the funds readily available:

    • Relatives and Friends – Borrowing money from family members or close friends is often the simplest method to pay a tax bill. One advantage of such loans is that the interest rate will probably be low; however, you must also consider that loans of more than $10,000 at below-market interest rates may trigger tax consequences. Any interest paid on this type of loan would be nondeductible.
    • Home-Equity Loans – A home-equity loan is another potential source of funds; such a loan has the advantage that the interest is deductible as long as the total equity loans on the home don’t exceed $100,000. However, in today’s financial environment, qualifying for these loans may be too time-consuming.
    • Credit or Debit Cards – Using your credit card to pay your taxes is another option. The IRS has approved three firms to provide this service. The disadvantages are that the interest rates are relatively high and that you must pay the merchant fee (because the IRS does not). For information about this fee and about making payments by credit card, visit the IRS website.
    • Installment Agreements – You can request an installment arrangement with the IRS. You must be up-to-date when filing your returns. There are also fees associated with setting up an installment agreement, and if you do not follow some strict payment rules, the agreement can be terminated. If your liability is under $50,000 and you can pay off the full liability within 6 years, you will not be required to submit financial statements, and you can apply online. When applying online, you’ll get an immediate acceptance or rejection of your payment plan.

    The fee for establishing such an agreement can be as high as $225, but it can be as low as $31 if you set up an online payment agreement and pay using direct debit from your bank account. You will also be charged interest, but the late-payment penalty will be half of the usual rate (1/4% instead of 1/2%) if you file your return by the due date (including extensions).

    If any of the following occur, the installment agreement may terminate, causing all of your taxes to become due immediately: the information you provided to the IRS in applying for the agreement proves inaccurate or incomplete; you miss an installment; you fail to pay another tax liability when it is due; the IRS believes that its collection of the tax involved is in jeopardy; or you fail to provide an update regarding your financial condition when the IRS makes a reasonable request for you to do so.

    • Pension Plans – Tapping into one’s pension plan or IRA should be a very last resort, not only because it degrades your future retirement but also because of the potential tax implications. Generally, except for Roth IRAs, the funds in retirement accounts are pretax; as a result, when withdrawn, they become taxable. If you are under 59½, any such distribution will also be subject to the 10% early-withdrawal penalty. Federal tax, state tax (if applicable), and this penalty can chew up a hefty amount of the distribution, which may be too high a price to pay.

    A Final Word of Caution – Ignoring your filing obligation only makes matters worse, and doing so can become very expensive. It can lead to the IRS collection process, which can include attachments, liens or even the seizure and sale of your property. In many cases, these tax nightmares can be avoided by taking advantage of the solutions discussed above. If you cannot pay your taxes, please call Dagley & Co. to discuss your options.

     

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  • January 2017 Individual Due Dates

    3 January 2017
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    JANUARY 2017 INDIVIDUAL DUE DATES

    January 3 – Call for Your Tax Appointment –

    It’s the beginning of tax season. If you have not made an appointment to have your taxes prepared, we encourage you do so ASAP.

    January 10 – Report Tips to Employer –

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during December, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than January 10.

    January 17 – Individual Estimated Tax Payment Due –

    It’s time to make your fourth quarter estimated tax installment payment for the 2016 tax year.

    January 17 – Farmers & Fishermen Estimated Tax Payment Due – If you are a farmer or fisherman whose gross income for 2015 or 2016 is two-thirds from farming or fishing, it is time to pay your estimated tax for 2016 using Form 1040-ES. You have until April 18, 2017 to file your 2016 income tax return (Form 1040). If you do not pay your estimated tax by January 17, you must file your 2016 return and pay any tax due by March 1, 2017 to avoid an estimated tax penalty.

     

    Contact Dagley & Co. with any questions, or concerns about January’s due dates.

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Only Nine Days Left for 2016 Tax Deductions

    22 December 2016
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    Your last day you may make a tax-deductible purchase, pay a tax-deductible expense or make tax-deductible charitable contributions for 2016 is this Saturday, Dec. 31.

    That still gives you time to make charitable contributions, pay deductible taxes, and make business acquisitions before year-end. However, making a last-minute purchase of business equipment isn’t enough to be able to deduct the cost of the equipment – you also must place that equipment into service before year’s end. This means you can’t take a deduction on your 2016 return if you take delivery of the equipment after the end of the year, even if you paid for the item in 2016.

    A charitable contribution to a qualified organization is considered made at the time of its unconditional delivery, which, for donations made by check, is the date you mail it. Contributions you make by text message are deductible in the year you send the text message if the contribution is charged to your telephone or wireless account. If you use a pay-by-phone account, the date the financial institution pays the amount is considered the date you made the contribution.

    If you pay your taxes by check and your financial institution honors the check, the day you mail or deliver the check is the date of payment. If you use a pay-by-phone account (such as electronic funds withdrawal), the date reported on the statement of the financial institution showing when payment was made is the date of the tax payment.

    Purchases, tax payments or contributions charged to your credit card are deemed purchased when the charge is made, regardless of when you pay the credit card company.

    Wishing you a happy holidays and a happy New Year. At Dagley & Co., we are looking forward to assisting you with your tax preparation needs during the coming tax season.

    As always, give us a call at (202) 417-6640 with any questions.

     

     

     

     

     

     

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