• Thinking of Tapping Your Retirement Savings? Read This First

    22 May 2017
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    Before you start tapping into your retirement savings, you may want to read this first:

    If you are under age 59½ and plan to withdraw money from a qualified retirement account, you will likely pay both income tax and a 10% early-distribution tax on any previously un-taxed money that you take out. Withdrawals you make from a SIMPLE IRA before age 59½ and those you make during the 2-year rollover restriction period after establishing the SIMPLE IRA may be subject to a 25% additional early-distribution tax instead of the normal 10%. The 2-year period is measured from the first day that contributions are deposited. These penalties are just what you’d pay on your federal return; your state may also charge an early-withdrawal penalty in addition to the regular state income tax.

    The following exceptions may help you avoid the penalty:

    • Withdrawals from any retirement plan to pay medical expenses—Amounts withdrawn to pay unreimbursed medical expenses are exempt from penalty if they would be deductible on Schedule A during the year and if they exceed 10% of your adjusted gross income. This is true even if you do not
    • IRA withdrawals annuitized over your lifetime—To qualify, the withdrawals must continue unchanged for a minimum of 5 years, including after you reach age 59½.
    • Employer retirement plan withdrawals—To qualify, you must be separated from service and be age 55 or older in that year (the lower limit is age 50 for qualified public-service employees such as police officers and firefighters) or elect to receive the money in substantially equal periodic payments after your separation from service.
    • Withdrawals from any retirement plan as a result of a disability—You are considered disabled if you can furnish proof that you cannot perform any substantial gainful activities because of a physical or mental condition. A physician must certify your condition.
    • IRA withdrawals by unemployed individuals to pay medical insurance premiums—The amount that is exempt from penalty cannot be more than the amount you paid during the year for medical insurance for yourself, your spouse, and your dependents. You also must have received unemployment compensation for at least 12 weeks during the year.
    • IRA withdrawals to pay higher education expenses—Withdrawals made during the year for qualified higher education expenses for yourself, your spouse, or your children or grandchildren are exempt from the early-withdrawal penalty.
    • IRA withdrawals to buy, build, or rebuild a first home—Generally, you are considered a first-time homebuyer for this exception if you had no present interest in a main home during the 2-year period leading up to the date the home was acquired, and the distribution must be used to buy, build, or rebuild that home. If you are married, your spouse must also meet this no-ownership requirement. This exception applies only to the first $10,000 of withdrawals used for this purpose. If married, you and your spouse can each withdraw up to $10,000 penalty-free from your respective IRA accounts.

    You should be aware that the information provided above is an overview of the penalty exceptions and that conditions other than those listed above may need to be met before qualifying for a particular exception. You are encouraged to contact this office before tapping your retirement funds for uses other than retirement. Distributions are most often subject to both normal taxes and other penalties, which can take a significant bite out of the distribution. However, with carefully planned distributions, both the taxes and the penalties can be minimized. Please call Dagley & Co. for assistance.

     

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  • New Form 1099 Filing Date

    9 January 2017
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    Did your business utilize an independent contractor in 2016? Did you pay him/her $600 or more during the calendar year? If so, you are required to issue him/her a Form 1099-MISC. The purpose of this form is to avoid penalties and the possibility of losing the deduction for his/her labor and expenses in an audit. Different from last year, the IRS moved up the filing due date to January 31, 2017.

    In addition to being used to report payments to independent contractors, Form 1099-MISC is also used to report payments made by a business for rents and royalties and to attorneys for legal services, among others. If there are no independent contractor payments to report, the 2016 1099-MISC issued for other payments continues to be due to the IRS by the normal due date of February 28, 2017. However, where both independent contractor and other payments are being reported, the January 31 due date should be observed so that late filing penalties are avoided regarding the independent contractor payments.

    It is not uncommon to have a repairman out early in the year, pay him less than $600, then use his services again later in the year and have the total for the year exceed the $599 limit. As a result, you may have overlooked getting the information from the individual that you need to file the 1099-MISCs for the year. Therefore, it is good practice to always have individuals who are not incorporated complete and sign an IRS Form W-9 the first time you engage them and before you pay them. Having a properly completed and signed Form W-9 for all independent contractors and service providers eliminates any oversights and protects you against IRS penalties and conflicts. If you have been negligent in the past about having the W-9s completed, it would be a good idea to establish a procedure for getting each non-corporate independent contractor and service provider to fill out a W-9 and return it to you going forward.

    IRS Form W-9, Request for Taxpayer Identification Number and Certification, is provided by the government as a means for you to obtain the data required to file 1099s for your vendors. It also provides you with verification that you have complied with the law in case the vendor gives you incorrect information. We highly recommend that you have potential vendors complete a Form W-9 before you engage in business with them. The W-9 is for your use only and is not submitted to the IRS.

    The penalty for failure to file the required informational returns is substantial and is $260 per informational return. The penalty is reduced to $50 if a correct but late information return is filed not later than the 30th day after the January 31, 2017, required filing date, or it is reduced to $100 for returns filed after the 30th day but no later than August 1, 2017. If you are required to file 250 or more information returns, you must file them electronically.

    Please note: To avoid penalties, all forms must be sent to the IRS by January 31, 2017.

    Dagley & Co. is here to prepare your 1099 for submission. We recommend using this 1099 worksheet  to provide us with the information needed to prepare your 1099.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Dodging Tax Penalties

    13 December 2016
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    After the holiday season, the tax season quickly approaches. During this time, many taxpayers realize they were penalized with a tax penalty from that year. With this, often times it’s the case that the taxpayer is not aware of the impact that these penalties can have on their wallet.  To help educate, Dagley & Co. has created a list of the most common encountered penalties and how to avoid them:

    Underpayment of Estimated Taxes and Withholding – Taxpayers are required to pay their tax liability as they go during the year, either through withholding or by making estimated tax payments. If the taxpayer owes more than $1,000 when filing his or her return for the year, the IRS will assess the underpayment of estimated tax penalty, which is currently 4% of the underpayment computed quarterly. There are “safe harbor” payments that can protect you from this penalty, which include payments in the following amounts: 90% of the current year’s tax liability or 100% (110% for high-income taxpayers) of the prior year’s tax liability. Farmers and fishermen need only prepay 66-2/3% of the current liability or 100% of the prior year’s liability.

    Late Paying Penalty – When the tax owed on a return is paid after the un-extended due date of the tax return (usually April 15), the taxpayer is subject to a penalty of 1/2% per month (maximum 25%) on the unpaid balance. Taxpayers are frequently caught by this penalty when they need an extension to file their tax return. Many fail to realize that the extension does not include an extension to pay. The only way to avoid or minimize this penalty is to have no or little balance due on the return when it is finally filed. The extension form includes a provision to pay the projected balance owed when filing the extension.

    Late Filing Penalty – If the return is filed after the due date, including extensions, a late filing penalty of 4.5% per month (maximum 22.5%) applies. The automatic extended due date for 2016 returns is October 18, 2017, but an extension request form must be filed by the April 2017 due date to qualify. Thus, the penalty would generally apply to 2016 returns filed after October 18, 2017. If the return is over 60 days late, the minimum penalty for failure to file is the lesser of $205 or 100% of the tax shown on the return. While the obvious way to avoid a late filing penalty is to file in a timely fashion, the IRS will consider abating the penalty if it can be proven that there was reasonable cause and no willful neglect for filing late.

    Negligence – When underpayment is due to negligence on the part of the taxpayer or when there are errors in tax valuations, 20% of the tax underpayment is charged. This penalty is frequently encountered when the IRS adjusts a filed return due to unreported income or overstated deductions. To reduce the chance that you may be subject to this penalty, be sure you provide all of your W-2s, 1099s, K-1s, etc. for the preparation of your return, complete any organizer that have been requested and ensure that you can substantiate all of the deductions you claim.

    Dishonored Check – The penalty for dishonored checks is 2% of the check amount, but if the amount is $1,250 or less, the penalty is the amount of the check or $25, whichever is less. If you don’t have sufficient funds to pay your tax when you file your return, rather than writing a check that you know will bounce, you may be able to arrange an installment payment plan with the IRS. You may still incur late payment charges, but the penalty rate is lower if you are on a payment plan.

    Missing ID Number – This penalty of $50 for each missing number is charged when a taxpayer doesn’t provide a required Social Security number (SSN) for him or herself, a dependent or another person on his or her tax return or doesn’t. It is also charged when the taxpayer doesn’t provide his or her SSN to another person or entity when required.

    Please note: There are more severe penalties (not mentioned) that apply to fraudulent actions/claims.  If you ever have questions related to these penalties, please give Dagley & Co. a call at  (202) 417-6640.

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • First 2016 Estimated Tax Payment Due Soon

    8 April 2016
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    Did you know the government has a “pay-as-you-go” system and wants its tax revenue up front? If your pre-paid amount is not enough, you may become liable for non-deductible interest penalties. To facilitate that concept, the government has provided several means of assisting taxpayers in meeting the “pay-as-you-go” requirement. The primary among these include: payroll withholding for employees; pension withholding for retirees; and estimated tax payments for self-employed individuals and those with other sources of income not covered by withholding.

    Determining how much tax to pre-pay through withholding and estimated tax payments has always been difficult, and thanks to Congress’ constant tinkering with the tax laws, ensuring there are no underpayment penalties or tax surprises when the tax return is prepared next year can be challenging.

    When a taxpayer fails to prepay a safe harbor (minimum) amount, he or she can be subject to the underpayment of estimated tax penalty. This penalty is the short-term federal rate plus 3 percentage points, and the penalty is computed on a quarter-by-quarter basis. So, even if you pre-pay the correct amount for the year, if the amounts are not paid evenly, you could be subject to a penalty. Interestingly enough, withholding amounts are treated as paid ratably throughout the year, so taxpayers who are underpaid in the earlier part of the year can compensate by bumping up their withholding in the later part of the year.

    Federal tax law does provide ways to avoid the underpayment penalty. If the underpayment is less than $1,000 (referred to as the de minimis amount), no penalty is assessed. In addition, the law provides “safe harbor” prepayments –meaning if you meet the parameters set by law, you won’t be penalized, even if your underpayment is more than $1,000. There are two safe harbors. The first safe harbor is based on the tax owed in the current year. If your payments equal or exceed 90% of what is owed in the current year, you can escape a penalty. The second safe harbor is based on the tax owed in the immediately preceding tax year. This safe harbor is generally 100% of the prior year’s tax liability. However, for a higher income taxpayer who has AGI exceeding $150,000 ($75,000 for married taxpayers filing separately), the prior year’s safe harbor is 110%.

    Example: Suppose your tax for the year is $10,000 and your prepayments total $5,600. The result is that you owe an additional $4,400 on your tax return. To find out if you owe a penalty, see if you meet the first safe harbor exception. As 90% of $10,000 is $9,000, your prepayments fell short of the mark. You can’t avoid the penalty under this exception.

    However, in the above example, the safe harbor may still apply. Assume your prior year’s tax was $5,000. As you prepaid $5,600, which is greater than 110% of the prior year’s tax (110% = $5,500), you qualify for this safe harbor and can escape the penalty.

    If your state has a state tax, the state’s de minimis amount and safe-harbor percentage and amount may be different.

    This example underscores the importance of making sure your prepayments are adequate, especially if you have a large increase in income. This is common when there is a large gain from the sale of stocks, sale of property, when large bonuses are paid, or when a taxpayer retires. If you need to make estimated tax installments for 2016, please note that the first payment for 2016 is due April 18, 2016.

    If you have questions regarding your pre-payments or would like to review and adjust your W-4 payroll withholding, W-4P pension withholding, and estimated tax payments to provide the desired tax result for 2016, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

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  • Penalty For Not Having Health Insurance Surprises Many

    7 March 2016
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    Do you happen to be one of the taxpayers that are surprised by the penalty for not having health insurance last year? The size of the penalty really astounds many. This may be a wake-up call for many who didn’t realize the penalty is being phased in over a three-year period between 2014 and 2016, and the increases are substantial each year.

    The penalty is determined by two methods, the flat dollar amount or a percentage of the taxpayer’s income, and the penalty is the GREATER of the two amounts.

    The flat dollar amount is the sum of fixed dollar amounts for the year that apply to each member of the taxpayer’s family. However, there is a cap on the total flat dollar amount, which is equal to 3 times the adult penalty for the year. The table below shows the amount per family member and maximum flat dollar amounts for each of the three penalty phase-in years.

    Year                                                  2014             2015             2016

    Adult Family Member                         $ 95.00       $325.00       $   695.00

    Member Under Age 18                      $ 47.50       $162.50       $   347.50

    Maximum Flat Dollar Penalty          $285.00       $975.00       $2,085.00

    Example: Suppose, in 2015, a family of 3 (2 married adults and 1 child) all went without insurance for the entire year. Their flat dollar amount penalty would be $812.50 ($325 + $325 + 162.50).

    The percentage-of-income penalty is a little more complicated, as the income used in the computation is the taxpayer’s household income reduced by the taxpayer’s tax return filing threshold for the year. Household income is the adjusted gross income from the tax returns for the year of all members of the taxpayer’s family who must file a tax return for income tax purposes.

    The table below shows the percentage-of-income penalty for each of the three penalty phase-in years.

    Year                                                  2014            2015            2016

    Percentage of income                      1.0%             2.0%              2.5%

    Example: Suppose the family in the previous example has a household income of $80,000 and their filing threshold is $20,600. Thus the income used in the computation would be $59,400 ($80,000 – $20,600), and the percentage-of-income penalty would be $1,188 ($59,400 x .02).

    In our example, the taxpayer’s penalty for 2015 would be the greater of the two methods, which is $1,188. This substantially penalizes higher-income taxpayers, who can more readily afford health care insurance.

    Another surprise to some taxpayers is that even if only one member of the family is uninsured, the percentage-of-income penalty applies if it is larger than the flat dollar amount for that one employee.

    In closing, the penalties are actually computed by the month, so for example, if a taxpayer is uninsured for five months, then 5/12 of the penalty will apply.

    If you have questions related to the penalty for not being insured or other tax provisions of the Affordable Care Act, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

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  • Taxes, Birthdays and Milestones

    13 October 2015
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    Did you know that your age can affect your tax liability? That’s right – depending on the number of candles on this year’s birthday cake, you may get a gift from Uncle Sam when you file your tax return. In some situations, the gift may not be because you reached a certain age, but will be the result of the age your dependent(s) or spouse turned this year. Unfortunately, not all of Uncle Sam’s gifts will be welcomed, because some birthdays mark the end of eligibility for certain credits or exclusions of income and others signal the start of needing to include retirement benefits in income.

    Under common law, a person attains a given age on the day before his or her birthday, which can impact the taxpayer’s return for certain age-related tax issues. For example, a taxpayer whose 65th birthday is on January 1 is considered to be age 65 as of December 31 of the prior year, and eligible for an additional standard deduction amount for the prior year. However per an IRS ruling on several tax provisions—which are discussed in this article—involving children, the child attains a given age on the actual date the child was born, instead of the day before.

    If you or someone in your tax family attains one of the following ages this year, here’s how your tax return may be impacted:

    Age 0 – Well, OK, zero isn’t really an age; but, if your dependent is born in 2015, you can claim a $4,000 exemption allowance for the child. Exemptions are subtracted from your gross income to determine your taxable income, and your taxable income determines your marginal tax bracket. So, for example, if you are in the 25% tax bracket, each exemption allowance reduces your tax by $1,000.

    Age 13 – If you qualify to claim a credit for child care expenses that you pay so that you (or if married filing a joint return, you and your spouse) can work or look for work, and the qualifying child who is your dependent turns 13 years old in 2015, only the expenses for care up to the date of the child’s 13th birthday will be eligible for the credit. Similarly, if you receive dependent care benefits from your employer, the value of those benefits is excludable from your income only for care before the child turns 13. An exception to the age limit applies if the dependent child is not physically or mentally able to care for himself or herself.

    Age 17 – One of the requirements for the child tax credit is that the qualifying child be younger than 17 at the end of the tax year. Thus, if your child turns 17 during 2015, you will not be allowed to claim the child tax credit for this child for 2015 or any future year. The amount of the credit is $1,000 per eligible child, subject to a phase-out based on your adjusted gross income (AGI).

    Age 18 – To claim an adoption credit for expenses you paid to adopt a child, the child must have been younger than 18 at the time you paid or incurred the expenses. A child turning 18 during the year is an eligible child for the part of the year he or she was younger than 18. The age limitation does not apply if the person you adopted is physically or mentally unable to take care of himself or herself.

    Age 19 – To be a qualifying child for dependency purposes, the child must be younger than 19 as of the end of the year (or younger than 24 if a full-time student). So, if your child’s 19th birthday was in 2015 and he or she is not a full-time student for some part of at least 5 months during the year, you can’t claim the child as a dependent under the definition of a qualifying child. (Once again, the age limitation does not apply for a child who is unable to physically or mentally provide self-care.) Depending upon both the child’s income and who provided the majority of the child’s support, you may be able to use a different definition to claim the dependency.

    Age 24 – If you’ve been claiming your older-than-18 child as a dependent based on the child being a full-time student who doesn’t provide more than half of his or her own support, you won’t be able to claim the child’s dependency under that rule starting in the year the child has his or her 24th birthday. Depending on the child’s gross income and other factors, you may still be entitled to the dependency exemption, but under the “other” dependent rules and not the “qualifying child” rules.

    Age 25 – If you are a lower-income taxpayer who is at least 25 years old before the end of the year, and you do not have a qualifying child, you may be eligible for the earned income credit. If you are married, and file a joint return, either you or your spouse must meet the age requirement. This age requirement for the earned income credit does not apply if you have a qualifying child.

    Age 27 – There are various provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that apply to a child younger than 27 (i.e., one who has not had his or her 27th birthday) as of the end of the year. For example, your younger-than-27 child may be included on your health insurance plan, even if the child is not your dependent. If you are self-employed, the premiums you paid for the health insurance coverage of a child younger than 27 can be included as part of the above-the-line deduction of health insurance costs you may be able to deduct.

    Age 50 – If you are a qualified public safety employee, such as a police officer or fireman who separates from service after age 50 and takes a distribution from your government employer’s defined benefit pension plan, the 10% early withdrawal penalty will not apply.

    Age 55 – If you take a distribution from your employer’s qualified retirement plan after separation from service in or after the year you reach age 55, the distribution is not subject to the 10% penalty that usually applies when distributions are taken before age 59 1/2. To qualify for this exception to the penalty, you must be age 55 or older, and then separate from employment. This provision does not apply to IRAs.

    Age 59 1/2 – Once you’ve reached age 59 1/2, distributions from your qualified retirement plans and traditional IRAs are no longer considered to be early distributions and, therefore, are not subject to the 10% early withdrawal penalty. However, in most cases, all of the distribution amount is includible in your income and will be taxed.

    Age 62 – Many individuals opt to start receiving their Social Security benefits – albeit at a reduced amount than if they had waited until they reached full retirement age – when they first become eligible to receive the payments, generally at age 62. If this is your first year for collecting SS benefits (whether at age 62 or another age), you may be surprised to learn that part of the benefits may be taxable. Depending on your other income and filing status, 50% to 85% of the benefits may be taxable.

    Age 65 – As mentioned above, starting with the year you reach age 65, you are eligible for an additional standard deduction amount. For 2015, the extra amount is $1,550 for a taxpayer filing as single or head of household or $1,250 for those filing married joint, married separate or a qualifying widow(er). There is no extra deduction if you itemize your deductions. If you file a joint return, you and your spouse, if he or she is also age 65 or older, are each allowed the additional amount.

    Through 2016, if you itemize deductions and either you or your spouse – if filing a joint return – is age 65 by the end of the year, you need to reduce your medical expenses by only 7.5% of AGI instead of the 10% reduction rate that applies to other taxpayers. If you are subject to the alternative minimum tax, only medical expenses exceeding 10% of your regular AGI are deductible for the AMT computation.

    If you’ve been claiming the earned income credit without having a dependent child, you will no longer be eligible for the credit starting in the year you turn 65.

    Contributions to a health savings account (HSA) are not permitted once you are entitled to benefits under Medicare, meaning you are eligible for and have enrolled in Medicare. Most individuals become Medicare eligible and enroll at age 65. Contributions to the HSA may continue until the month you are actually enrolled in Medicare.

    Age 70 1/2 – If you turned 70 1/2 in 2015, distributions from your traditional IRA must begin by April 1, 2016; otherwise, a minimum distribution penalty can apply. You must continue to take distributions annually. Not only must you take distributions after turning 70 1/2, the law specifies how the minimum distribution is to be calculated. You may take a larger distribution, but the amount in excess of the required minimum distribution amount cannot be used to reduce future required distributions. You are considered age 70 1/2 on the date that is 6 calendar months after the 70th anniversary of your birth.

    In general, if you are or were an employee whose employer has a qualified plan, distributions from the qualified plan must begin no later than April 1 of the year following the year in which you attain age 70 1/2 or (except if you are a 5 percent owner), if later, you retire. This “retirement, if later” exception does not apply to IRAs.

    If you were required to take your first distribution in 2015 but delay the withdrawal until April 1 of 2016, you will then have two distributions to include in your 2016 income, since the regular 2016 distribution must be taken by December 31 of that year.

    You cannot make a contribution to a traditional IRA for the year in which you reach age 70 1/2 or for any later year. Contributions to Roth IRAs, however, are allowed regardless of age provided you have wages, self-employment income or alimony income.

    If you or a member of your tax family celebrated a milestone birthday (or half-birthday) this year and you have questions as to how the tax implications of that event will affect your return, please get in touch with us at Dagley & Co.

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