• Don’t Overlook Tax Deductions for Home Ownership

    20 February 2017
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    As a homeowner, you should be aware of the many tax benefits that go along with ownership. At Dagley & Co., we compiled a list of tax benefits that will be helpful for the current and next year’s tax season:

    Mortgage Interest Deduction – Although it may seem that you will never get that mortgage paid off, keep in mind that unmarried taxpayers and married couples can deduct, as an itemized deduction, the interest on up to $1 million of acquisition debt plus $100,000 of equity debt on their first and second homes, provided the loans are secured by the homes. A married taxpayer filing separately is limited to deducting the interest on $500,000 of acquisition debt and $50,000 of equity debt.

    Home Improvement Loan Interest Deduction – If you took out a loan secured by your home to make improvements on your main or a second home, that mortgage is treated the same as home acquisition debt, and the interest you pay on that loan is deductible as acquisition debt, so long as the combined total acquisition debt of the two homes does not exceed the $1 million limit on acquisition debt. Even if it does exceed the $1 million limit, the excess interest on up to the $100,000 equity debt limit may still be deductible. However, if you used the loan money to make repairs rather than improvements, the debt would only qualify as equity debt.

    Equity Debt – If you used the equity in your home to borrow money to buy a car, take a vacation, or for another use, interest paid on that debt is deductible up to the $100,000 equity debt limit. That is why it is sometimes better to finance large purchases with a deductible home equity loan rather than a non-deductible consumer loan.

    Property Tax Deduction – If you itemize your deductions, you can deduct the property taxes you paid during the year on your home. However, be careful; generally property taxes are billed on a fiscal year basis, so the amount billed may cover parts of two years. You can only deduct what you actually paid during the year. If you have an impound account (sometimes called an escrow account) with your mortgage lender, the amount paid will be included on the lender’s annual statement. Also be aware that if you are subject to the alternative minimum tax (AMT), a deduction for taxes is not allowed when computing the AMT.

    Private Mortgage Insurance Premiums – Generally when home buyers are unable to make a 20% down payment when purchasing a home, the lender will require them to obtain private mortgage insurance (PMI) and the insurance premiums that go along with it. To be deductible, the insurance contract must have been issued after December 31, 2006. Those premiums are deductible if incurred for the purchase of your first or second home, and they are not limited by the $1 million limitation on home acquisition debt.

    The deductible amount of the premiums phases out ratably by 10% for each $1,000 by which the taxpayer’s AGI exceeds $100,000 (10% for each $500 by which a married separate taxpayer’s AGI exceeds $50,000). If AGI is over $109,000 ($54,500 married separate), the deduction is totally phased out.

    Congress failed to extend this deduction, and thus 2016 is the last year for it. If you are stuck with a PMI and your equity in your property has grown to be greater than 20% (you’ve paid down the mortgage balance to 80% of the home’s original appraised value), you may want to contact your lender about removing the PMI, refinancing to get rid of it, or obtaining an updated appraisal. When the balance drops to 78%, the mortgage servicer is required to eliminate PMI. (These rules generally don’t apply if your loan is guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) or Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).)

    Solar Energy Credits – Through 2021, taxpayers can get a tax credit on their federal tax return for purchasing and installing solar electric or solar water heating systems. The credit is 30% of the cost through 2019, at which time it begins to phase out and the credit is reduced to 26% for 2020 and 22% for the final year of 2021.

    The credit is nonrefundable, which means it can only be used to offset a taxpayer’s current tax liability, but any excess can be carried forward to offset tax through 2021. Both the solar electric and the solar water systems qualify for credit if installed on a taxpayer’s primary and secondary residences. However, no credit is allowed for heating water for hot tubs and swimming pools.

    Impairment-Related Home Expenses – If you, your spouse or a dependent living in your home has a physical handicap and you make modifications to the home or install special equipment to alleviate that disability, those costs may be deductible as a medical expense. The portion of the cost of permanent improvements that increases the value of the home is not deductible, but the difference can be included as a medical expense. However, home modifications made to accommodate a home for an individual’s handicap generally do not increase the value of the home and can be included in full with your medical deductions. These improvements include, but are not limited to, the following items:

    • Constructing entrance or exit ramps for the home,
    • Widening doorways at entrances or exits to the home,
    • Adding handrails, support bars and grab bars,
    • Lowering or modifying kitchen cabinets and equipment, and
    • Installing porch and stair lifts.

    Points Deduction – Points are a form of prepaid interest; one point is equal to 1% of a loan amount. Points are often labeled “loan origination fees,” “premium charges,” etc. At times, certain loan charges may be called points but are really amounts lenders charge for setting up a loan. Such “service charge points” aren’t normally deductible.

    Generally, prepaid interest must be amortized (deducted) over the life of a loan; however, tax law carved out a special rule that allows points incurred for purchase of a primary residence to be fully deducted on the return for the year in which they are paid. This special rule also applies to loan points incurred for home improvement loans.

    Home Office Deduction – If you are self-employed, you may qualify for a deduction for the business use of your home, commonly known as the home office deduction. You may also qualify if you are an employee and the use of the home is for the convenience of the employer. In either case the portion of the home used for business qualifies for the deduction only if it is used exclusively for business.

    There are two methods that can be used to determine the deduction: (1) the actual expense method, where you prorate the home expenses such as utilities, insurance, maintenance, interest, taxes and depreciation, or (2) a simplified deduction, which is $5 per square foot of office space, with a maximum square footage of 300. If the latter method is used, mortgage interest and real property tax deductions may be claimed as usual as part of itemized deductions, but a proration of other home-related expenses isn’t deductible. In either case, the deduction is limited to the income from the business activity.

    If you have questions about any of these tax related home ownership deductions/issues, give Dagley & Co. a call. Or, are you considering purchasing a home? Dagely & Co. will help you to understand how the home ownership will impact your taxes.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Time-Share Use as a Charitable Contribution

    9 May 2016
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    Have you ever attended a charity auction? If so, it is not uncommon to see a week’s use of a time-share included in the items donated for auction. The time-share owners who donate these weeks generally do so in anticipation of being able to take charitable donation deduction on their tax returns.

    How does one determine how much one can deduct for such a donation? The answer may come as a surprise. Per an IRS revenue ruling(1), the use of a property, or the permission to use and occupy a property, does not constitute a gift of property. In addition, the Internal Revenue Code does not allow a charitable deduction for a gift of a partial interest in a property unless this is done in trust(2). Therefore, no charitable contribution deduction is allowed for the use of a time-share property.

    Time-share owners are generally required to pay an annual maintenance fee that covers the pro rata upkeep of the resort itself, plus housekeeping services. The question arises: Can the time-share owner deduct the maintenance fee for the week donated?

    IRS regulations (3) allow deductions for expenses incurred in connection with personally rendered services to a qualified organization. However, services provided by others, even if paid for by the taxpayer, are not personally rendered to the charity and thus are not deductible. Since this includes the services provided by the time-share management company that is paid for with the taxpayer’s maintenance fees, the time-share’s maintenance fees for the donated period are not deductible.

    However, if the taxpayer incurred other expenses in connection with the donated use of the time-share, such as driving to the time-share property to let the winning bidder into the unit, a deduction for those expenses would be allowed under IRS regulations (3). This is because the time-share owner would be performing the service directly for the charitable organization; a mileage deduction at the rate of 14 cents per mile would be allowed.

    As a bottom line, the donation of the use of a time-share does not constitute a charitable contribution. If you have questions related to charitable contributions please give Dagley & Co. a call.

    • Rev Rul 70-477, I.R.B. 1970-3
    • IRC Sec 170(f)(3)(A)
    • IRS Reg 1.170A-1(g).

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  • Big Business Write-Offs Available

    28 April 2016
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    Big Business write-offs are available. Extending bonus depreciation and making the Section 179 deduction’s higher expensing amount permanent are two significant changes Congress made in the tax law. These business-friendly changes are due to the enactment of the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act. This article examines these changes so that you can take full advantage of them in your trade or business.

    Section 179 Deduction – This provision allows a business owner or entity to immediately expense, rather than capitalize (depreciate), the cost of new or used tangible property—both personal property and certain real property—placed in service during the tax year. The maximum amount is adjusted annually for inflation and is $500,000 for 2016. However, based on Code Section 179, the maximum amount is reduced dollar-for-dollar by the cost of property placed in service during the tax year in excess of $2,010,000 (for 2016; this is also inflation-adjusted annually).

    The PATH Act also dealt with the option to revoke the Section 179 election without the consent of the IRS, making it permanent as well; however, once an election is made and revoked, it becomes irrevocable.

    In addition, the PATH Act permanently allows the ability to apply Section 179 expensing to off-the-shelf computer software and qualified real property, which is defined as qualified leasehold or restaurant property and retail improvements. In addition, the $250,000 expense limitation and the carryover limitations have been removed. Finally, air conditioning and heating units are eligible for expensing after December 31, 2015.

    Bonus Depreciation – Although the PATH Act did not make bonus depreciation permanent, it extended it through 2019 by slowly phasing it out by reducing the bonus percentage. Bonus depreciation allows businesses to take a depreciation deduction in the first year that the property, which must be acquired new, is placed in service. This depreciation can be for as much as 50% in the years 2012 through 2017 before phasing out in 2018 and 2019; it will no longer be available after 2019 without further Congressional action. The following are the bonus depreciation percentage rates through 2019: 50% through 2017, 40% for 2018 and 30% for 2019.

    Bonus depreciation generally applies to property with a class life of no more than 20 years. It also applies to: first, qualified leasehold property (qualified interior improvement to nonresidential property after the building is placed in service). Second, certain fruit- or nut-bearing plants planted or grafted before January 1, 2020.

    Luxury Automobile Rates – Bonus depreciation also impacts the first-year deduction for automobiles and small trucks; in the past, this has added $8,000 to the first-year allowable deduction. Now that the bonus depreciation is being extended and phased out, so is the bonus allowance for automobiles and small trucks. Thus, the luxury auto rates will increase based on the following bonus depreciation rates: 2015 through 2017 – $8,000, 2018 – $6,400, 2019 – $4,800.

    If you need assistance regarding strategies for your business’s use of the Section 179 expense deduction or bonus depreciation, please call Dagley & Co.

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  • Homeowner Energy Tax Credits Get New Life

    21 January 2016
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    Do you want to take advantage of your energy credits as a homeowner? Renewed opportunities to homeowners wanting to take advantage of energy credits and reduce their costs are possible after a recently passed legislation to two homeowners with these credits that were about to expire.

    The first of the two credits is what the tax code refers to as the Residential Energy Property Credit. A more descriptive title would be an energy saving credit since it applies to improvements to the taxpayer’s existing primary home to make it more energy efficient. This credit was extended for two more years, allowing homeowners to claim the credit for qualifying energy improvements made in 2015 and 2016.

    The credit generally applies to insulation, storm windows and doors, and certain types of energy-efficient roofing materials, air-conditioning and hot water systems.

    The credit is 10% of the cost of the energy-saving items but does not apply to the cost of installation and is limited to a lifetime maximum of $500. So if you have taken advantage of this credit in the past and received $500 or more in credit in a prior year, you cannot claim any additional credit.

    In addition to the $500 overall limitation, there are also per-item limitations on the credit; for example, qualified windows and skylights – $200, qualified hot water boiler – $150 and qualified energy-efficient equipment – $300.

    The credit is nonrefundable and can only be used to offset income taxes (including the alternative minimum tax).

    The second credit to be extended is called the Residential Energy Property Credit. Better known as the home solar credit, it also provides credit for wind energy systems, geothermal systems and fuel cell systems. The credit is generally 30% of the qualified property and installation costs, subject to some limitations for fuel cell and geothermal systems.

    The credit, which was scheduled to expire after 2016, has been extended through 2021, but only for solar electric and solar hot water systems (excluding swimming pools). In addition, the credit percentage is phased out beginning after 2019. The following are the credit percentages allowed through 2021: 2009 through 2021: No annual limit, 2009–2019: 30%, 2020: rate reduced to 26% and only on solar-related systems, and 2021: rate reduced to 22% and only on solar-related systems.

    There is no limit on the actual credit other than the credit percentage. It is a nonrefundable credit and can be used to offset income tax liability (including the AMT). However, if the credit is unused because it exceeds the income tax amount, it can be carried over to another year as long as the credit has not expired.

    When considering whether or not to go to the expense of installing a solar system, you need to consider a number of issues. Is it cost effective considering your electric usage? How will you pay for it? If you finance it are the terms and interest rate reasonable for your financial situation? How will it affect your property’s value? Will you be able to benefit from the tax credits?

    Installing solar is a big financial commitment and should be considered carefully. Don’t let a solar system salesperson rush you into a decision. If you need assistance analyzing the financial and tax aspects of installing a solar system, please give Dagley & Co. a call before you sign on the dotted line.

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