• Can’t Pay Your Tax Liability?

    13 April 2017
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    Can’t pay your tax liability for 2016? We have the information you need to know:

    First, do not let your inability to pay your tax liability in full keep you from filing your tax return on time. If your return is not on time, you must still pay the “failure to file” penalty, which accrues at a rate of 5% per month on the amount of tax that you owe based on your return.

    If in doubt, you can delay the “failure to file” penalty for six months by filing an extension, but this still won’t keep you penalty free.

    Although an extension provides you with more time to file your actual return, it is not an extension of your payment date. If you do not pay the balance of your 2016 tax liability, you will be subject to the “failure to pay” penalty. This penalty accrues at the rate of 0.5% per month or partial month (up to a maximum of 25%) on the amount that you owe based on your return.

    If both penalties apply, the “failure to file” penalty drops to 4.5% per month or part thereof, so the total combined penalty remains 5%. The maximum combined penalty for the first five months is thus 25%. Thereafter, the “failure to pay” penalty will continue to increase at 1/2% per month for 45 more months (up to an additional 22.5%). Thus, the combined penalties can reach a total of 47.5% over time. Both of these penalties are in addition to the interest charges on the late payments.

    The bottom line is that, if you owe money, it is best to file your return on time even if you can’t pay the entire liability. That will minimize your penalties. Paying as much as you can with your return will further minimizing your penalties. By the way, neither the penalties nor the interest are tax-deductible.

    Possible Solutions – The following are possible ways to pay your tax liability when you don’t have the funds readily available:

    • Relatives and Friends – Borrowing money from family members or close friends is often the simplest method to pay a tax bill. One advantage of such loans is that the interest rate will probably be low; however, you must also consider that loans of more than $10,000 at below-market interest rates may trigger tax consequences. Any interest paid on this type of loan would be nondeductible.
    • Home-Equity Loans – A home-equity loan is another potential source of funds; such a loan has the advantage that the interest is deductible as long as the total equity loans on the home don’t exceed $100,000. However, in today’s financial environment, qualifying for these loans may be too time-consuming.
    • Credit or Debit Cards – Using your credit card to pay your taxes is another option. The IRS has approved three firms to provide this service. The disadvantages are that the interest rates are relatively high and that you must pay the merchant fee (because the IRS does not). For information about this fee and about making payments by credit card, visit the IRS website.
    • Installment Agreements – You can request an installment arrangement with the IRS. You must be up-to-date when filing your returns. There are also fees associated with setting up an installment agreement, and if you do not follow some strict payment rules, the agreement can be terminated. If your liability is under $50,000 and you can pay off the full liability within 6 years, you will not be required to submit financial statements, and you can apply online. When applying online, you’ll get an immediate acceptance or rejection of your payment plan.

    The fee for establishing such an agreement can be as high as $225, but it can be as low as $31 if you set up an online payment agreement and pay using direct debit from your bank account. You will also be charged interest, but the late-payment penalty will be half of the usual rate (1/4% instead of 1/2%) if you file your return by the due date (including extensions).

    If any of the following occur, the installment agreement may terminate, causing all of your taxes to become due immediately: the information you provided to the IRS in applying for the agreement proves inaccurate or incomplete; you miss an installment; you fail to pay another tax liability when it is due; the IRS believes that its collection of the tax involved is in jeopardy; or you fail to provide an update regarding your financial condition when the IRS makes a reasonable request for you to do so.

    • Pension Plans – Tapping into one’s pension plan or IRA should be a very last resort, not only because it degrades your future retirement but also because of the potential tax implications. Generally, except for Roth IRAs, the funds in retirement accounts are pretax; as a result, when withdrawn, they become taxable. If you are under 59½, any such distribution will also be subject to the 10% early-withdrawal penalty. Federal tax, state tax (if applicable), and this penalty can chew up a hefty amount of the distribution, which may be too high a price to pay.

    A Final Word of Caution – Ignoring your filing obligation only makes matters worse, and doing so can become very expensive. It can lead to the IRS collection process, which can include attachments, liens or even the seizure and sale of your property. In many cases, these tax nightmares can be avoided by taking advantage of the solutions discussed above. If you cannot pay your taxes, please call Dagley & Co. to discuss your options.

     

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  • Do I Have to File a Tax Return?

    30 January 2017
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    IRS 1040 Tax Form Being Filled Out

    “Do I have to file a tax return?” is a question heard a lot during this time of year. The answer to this popular question is a lot more complicated than many would think. To understand, one must realize the difference between being required to file a tax return vs. the benefit of filing a tax return even when it’s not required to file. We’ve put together a comprehensive description for your better understating:

    When individuals are required to file-

    • Generally, individuals are required to file a return if their income exceeds their filing threshold, as shown in the table below. The filing thresholds are the sum of the standard deduction for individual(s) and the personal exemption for the taxpayer and spouse (if any).
    • Taxpayers are required to file if they have net self-employment income in excess of $400, since they are required to file self-employment taxes (the equivalent to payroll taxes for an employee) when their net self-employment income exceeds $400.
    • Taxpayers are also required to file when they are required to repay a credit or benefit. For example, if a taxpayer acquired health insurance through a government marketplace and received advanced premium tax credit (APTC) they are required to file a return whether or not they are otherwise required to file. A return is required in order to reconcile the APTC with the premium tax credit they entitled based upon their household income for the year.  So generally if you receive a 1095-A you are required to file.
    • Filing is also required when a taxpayer owes a penalty, even though the taxpayer’s income is below the filing threshold. This can occur, for example, when a taxpayer has an IRA 6% early withdrawal penalty or the 50% penalty for not taking a required IRA distribution.

     

    2016 – Filing Thresholds

    Filing Status                      Age                                 Threshold

    Single                          Under Age 65                         $10,350

    Age 65 or Older                           11,900

    Married Filing Jointly       Both Spouses Under 65            $20,700

    One Spouse 65 or Older                 21,950

    Both Spouses 65 or Older              23,200

    Married Filing Separate   Any Age                                       4,050

    Head of Household         Under 65                               $13,350

    65 or Older                                 14,900

    Qualifying Widow(er)      Under 65                               $16,650

    with Dependent Child      65 or Older                                 17,900

     

    When it is beneficial for individuals to file-

    There are a number of benefits available when filing a tax return that can produce refunds even for a taxpayer who is not required to file:

    • Withholding refund – A substantial number of taxpayers fail to file their return even when the tax they owe is less than their prepayments, such as payroll withholding, estimates, or a prior over-payment. The only way to recover the excess is to file a return.
    • Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) – If you worked and did not make a lot of money, you may qualify for the EITC. The EITC is a refundable tax credit, which means you could qualify for a tax refund. The refund could be as high as several thousand dollars even when you are not required to file.
    • Additional Child Tax Credit – This refundable credit may be available to you if you have at least one qualifying child.
    • American Opportunity Credit – The maximum for this credit for college tuition paid per student is $2,500, and the first four years of post-secondary education qualify. Up to 40% of the credit is refundable when you have no tax liability, even if you are not required to file.
    • Premium Tax Credit – Lower-income families are entitled to a refundable tax credit to supplement the cost of health insurance purchased through a government Marketplace. To the extent the credit is greater than the supplement provided by the Marketplace, it is refundable even if there is no other reason to file.

     

    For more information about filing requirements and your eligibility to receive tax credits, please contact Dagley & Co. for more information. We recommend not procrastinating, no matter what your stance on filing may be!

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • So You Want to Deduct Your Work Clothes?

    20 October 2016
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    A frequent question we get is : Can I deduct the cost of my work clothing on my tax return? The answer to this question is “maybe.” The IRS provides the following guidelines for when expenses for work clothes are deductible:

    1) They are worn as a condition of employment

    AND

    2) The clothing is not suitable for everyday wear.

    It is not enough that the clothing be distinctive; it must be specifically required by the taxpayer’s employer. Nor is it enough that the taxpayer does not, in fact, wear the work clothes away from work. The clothing must not be suitable for taking the place of the taxpayer’s regular clothing. So, just because your employer requires you to wear a suit at work does not make that suit deductible, because it is suitable for everyday wear.

    The following are examples of workers who may be able to deduct the cost and upkeep of work clothes: delivery workers, firefighters, health care workers, law enforcement officers, letter carriers, professional athletes, and transportation workers (air, rail, bus, etc.). Note that those types of occupations usually require uniform-type clothing, which is generally deductible if required by the employer.

    Musicians and entertainers can deduct the cost of theatrical clothing and accessories if they are not suitable for everyday wear. The IRS contends that white bib overalls and standard shoes, such as a painter might wear, are not distinctive in character or in the nature of a uniform, so they are not deductible.

    Generally, when deciding whether costs to purchase and maintain clothing are eligible to be deducted, the courts use an objective test that makes no reference to the individual taxpayer’s lifestyle or personal taste. Instead, the courts in considering whether clothing is adaptable for personal or general use look to what is generally considered ordinary street wear.

    For example, in a recent Tax Court case, the court held that a salesman for Ralph Lauren who was required to purchase and wear the designer’s apparel while representing the company couldn’t deduct the cost of such clothing. The court found that the clothing was clearly suitable for regular wear and therefore not deductible.

    Protective Clothing – The costs of protective clothing required for work, such as safety shoes or boots, safety glasses, hard hats and work gloves, are deductible. Examples of workers who may require safety items include carpenters, cement workers, chemical workers, electricians, fishing workers, linemen, machinists, oil field workers, pipe fitters and truck drivers.

    Military UniformsTaxpayers generally cannot deduct the cost of uniforms if they are on full-time active duty in the armed forces. However, armed forces reservists can deduct the un-reimbursed cost of uniforms if military regulations restrict the taxpayers from wearing a uniform except while on duty as a reservist. A student at an armed forces academy cannot deduct the cost of uniforms if they replace regular clothing. However, the cost of insignia, shoulder boards, and related items are deductible. Civilian faculty and staff members of a military school can deduct the cost of uniforms.

    When deductible, the cost of the clothing and upkeep is considered a miscellaneous itemized deduction. However, miscellaneous itemized deductions are only allowed to the extent that they exceed 2% of your adjusted gross income. So higher-income taxpayers with no or few other miscellaneous itemized deductions may not benefit from a deduction.

    Please contact Dagley & Co. if you have any questions about the deduction of your work clothing.

     

     

     

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  • Preparing Your Own Tax Return? That May Not Be a Wise Decision.

    14 September 2016
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    At Dagley & Co. we hear a lot about the complexity of the tax code, as well as a lot of rhetoric from Washington about simplifying it. Tax codes were originally written to bring in money (taxes) to pay for government costs. But over the years, Congress has used tax codes more as a tool to manage social reform. As a result, the code has become very complex.

    So with taxes becoming more complex with each passing year, why do people think they can prepare their own returns? We use software-costing thousands of dollars, so why do individuals, not educated in tax law and using low-cost computer software, think they can get their tax result right? Well, they may not, and they may miss deductions, credits, income exclusions, retirement benefits, and even more beneficial filing options just to save a few bucks on tax preparation costs.

    However, paying a little more in tax than they need to should not be their biggest concern. A more troublesome situation is getting more tax refund than they are entitled to, and then a year or two later getting a letter from the IRS wanting the excess back. This is especially devastating to lower-income individuals and families that spend what they bring in just making ends meet and have no savings to fall back on when the IRS comes calling, leaving them with even a bigger financial hole.

    To make matters worse, they may not even understand the IRS letter or the issue it is dealing with, and since they did their own return, they have no one to call for help in getting the tax assessment reduced or knowing how to get penalties abated.

    Professional tax preparation offers more than just entering numbers into a computer program. If you usually file your own tax returns, perhaps you should consider a firm that can not only prepare your taxes properly, but also provide tax, financial and retirement guidance. We are also here to help plan for the future. Give Dagley & Co., CPA’s a call this year, we are here to help.

     

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  • Most Overlooked Tax Deduction

    11 May 2016
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    The IRD deduction is one of the most overlooked tax deductions. IRD is the acronym for income in respect of a decedent. So what is IRD income? It is income that is taxable to the decedent’s estate and also taxable to the beneficiaries of the estate.

    Estate tax is a tax on property transfers. Thus, when an individual dies, the value of all of his property is added up and the amount that exceeds the lifetime estate tax exclusion (currently at $5.45 million) less any prior taxable gifts is subject to estate tax. In some cases the estate includes items that are taxable both to the estate and to the beneficiaries, such as a traditional IRA, uncollected business income, and accrued bond interest. To make up for this double taxation, the beneficiaries are allowed an itemized deduction for the portion of the estate tax attributable to the double-taxed income.

    The problem is that the beneficiaries do not receive anything from the estate to make them aware of an IRD deduction or the amount of the deduction, if one exists. A beneficiary must recognize when there is an IRD and a possibility of a deduction and make further inquiries.

    The first clue is, did you as a beneficiary of the estate receive a Form 1099-R or Schedule K-1 with taxable income from the estate? If so, you need to inquire whether a Form 706 Estate Tax Return was filed, and if so, whether it resulted in tax due. If there was a tax due, then there is a good chance you are entitled to an IRD deduction. Request a copy of the 706 Estate Tax Return and provide it to this office so we can determine whether you are entitled to a deduction and if so, how much it is worth.

    The deduction is generally the difference in the estate tax figured with and without the double-taxed income. Please call Dagley & Co. if you need additional information.

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  • What Are the Tax Implications of Paying or Receiving Alimony?

    24 April 2016
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    If you’re recently divorced, you may pay or receive alimony. Here are some tips for how to correctly treat the payments on your tax return.

    The first consideration is the definition of alimony. There are actually two definitions of alimony—one for payments made under divorce decrees and separation agreements established before 1985 and another for agreements established since that time. For the purposes of this article, only the rules for post-1984 decrees and agreements will be discussed.

    For post-1984 decrees and agreements, alimony has the following requirements: The payments must be in cash paid to a spouse, ex-spouse or third party on behalf of a spouse or ex-spouse, and the payments must be made after the divorce decree is finalized. If made under a separation agreement, the payments must be made after the execution of that agreement. The payments must be required by a decree or instrument incident to divorce, a written separation agreement, or a support decree. The payments cannot be designated as child support. Child support payments are neither income for the recipient nor a deduction for the payer. Payments made while spouses or ex-spouses share the same household don’t qualify as alimony. This is true even if the spouses live separately within a dwelling unit. The payments must end upon the death of the payee. The payments cannot be contingent on the status of a child. This is to prevent child support from being disguised as deductible alimony.

    If payments you receive from or make to a spouse or former spouse meet the definition of alimony, those payments are taxable for the recipient and deductible for the payer. There is one exception to this rule, however: A divorce decree or separation agreement can designate that alimony payments are neither deductible nor taxable. If this is the case, the payments are not reportable on either party’s tax return.

    Here are some additional issues that should be considered.

    The IRS requires that a taxpayer deducting alimony include the payee’s Social Security Number (SSN) on his or her tax return. Thus, the recipient must provide his or her SSN to the payer.

    The IRS has noted that a significant number of taxpayers incorrectly report their alimony by either understating the income or overstating the amount paid. As a result, the IRS computer compares the amounts listed on the payer’s and recipient’s tax returns, and it will initiate a correspondence audit where there is a discrepancy.

    The recipient of alimony payments may treat alimony payments as compensation even if those payments are that person’s only income. This allows alimony recipients to save for their retirement by making either Traditional or Roth IRA contributions, the rules for which require the contributor to have earned income or compensation. Alimony income satisfies this requirement.

    If a divorce decree or other written instrument or agreement calls for both alimony and child support, and the person making the payments pays less than the total required, the payments apply first to child support. Any remaining amount is then considered alimony.

    There is no income tax withholding from alimony payments, so the recipient may need to consider making estimated tax payments.

    Other complications can occur that are not addressed here. If you have such complications or wish to discuss alimony as it applies to your circumstances, please give Dagley & Co. a call.

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  • February 2016 Individual Due Dates

    5 February 2016
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    If you are uncertain of your tax due dates, here is a little help for you.

    February 1 – Tax Appointment

    If you don’t already have an appointment scheduled with Dagley & Co., you should call to make an appointment that is convenient for you.

    February 1 – File 2015 Return to Avoid Penalty for Not Making 4th Quarter Estimated Payment

    If you file your prior year’s return and pay any tax due by this date, you need not make the 4th Quarter Estimated Tax Payment (January calendar).

    February 10 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during January, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than February 10.

    Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    February 16 – Last Date to Claim Exemption from Withholding

    If you claimed an exemption from income tax withholding last year on the Form W-4 you gave your employer, you must file a new Form W-4 by this date to continue your exemption for another year.

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