You filed for an extension on your tax return. Now what?

15 September 2014
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Over 15 million people and businesses filed for a tax extension in 2014. If you’re one of them, your deadline – October 15th, 2014 – is quickly approaching.

It’s not that uncommon to extend taxes. Whether it’s a new business owner filing for the first time, or receipts for deductions were delayed, to just plain old procrastination, there are many reasons why that first deadline may not have been met. However, if you’re one of those people who is still having trouble wrapping up those obligations for 2014, it might be time to hire Dagley & Co. to ensure a smooth tax return for yourself, your business and your family.

Hiring a CPA, or a Certified Public Accountant, is an ideal route to take if you’re feeling overwhelmed with the thought of diving back into that tax paper work. CPAs go through a rigorous education track and must pass an exam to become certified. Since 1896, by law a CPA candidate must sit for and pass the Uniform Certified Public Accountant Examination (Uniform CPA Exam), which is set by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) and administered by the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA). Just to sit down and take the exam, a CPA candidate must clock what’s known as the “150 hour rule”, which usually requires an additional year past a regular four-year college degree, or a master’s degree. For example, Dan Dagley got his MBA in accounting from the George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

Picking a CPA can be tricky. However, if you are a small- to medium-sized business, you’ve come to the right place. Dagley & Co. specializes in the unique needs of small businesses, and can work with anyone from anywhere thanks to today’s technology. Our team is well equipped to handle a tax extension for any business or individual that has “waited until the last minute.”

For added peace of mind, read any of the glowing reviews on Dagley’s TurboTax page.

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