• August 2016 Due Dates

    29 July 2016
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    August is here, which means there are due dates you need to know about. We have both individual and business due dates in the following:

    August 2016 Individual Due Dates

    August 10 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during July, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than August 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    August 2016 Business Due Dates

    August 1 – Self-Employed Individuals with Pension Plans 

    If you have a pension or profit-sharing plan, this is the final due date for filing Form 5500 or 5500-EZ for calendar year 2015.

    August 1 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    File Form 941 for the second quarter of 2016. Deposit or pay any undeposited tax under the accuracy of deposit rules. If your tax liability is less than $2,500, you can pay it in full with a timely filed return. If you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time, you have until August 10 to file the return.

    August 1 – Certain Small Employers

    Deposit any undeposited tax if your tax liability is $2,500 or more for 2016 but less than $2,500 for the second quarter.

    August 1 – Federal Unemployment Tax

    Deposit the tax owed through June if more than $500.

    August 1 – All Employers

    If you maintain an employee benefit plan, such as a pension, profit-sharing, or stock bonus plan, file Form 5500 or 5500-EZ for calendar year 2015. If you use a fiscal year as your plan year, file the form by the last day of the seventh month after the plan year-ends.

    August 10 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    File Form 941 for the second quarter of 2016. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time.

    August 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in July.

    August 15 – Non-Payroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in July.

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  • Tax Filing Deadline Rapidly Approaching

    29 March 2016
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    Sit down and get to work. Tax day is just a few weeks away! For those of you who have not yet filed their 2015 tax return, tax day is the due date to either file your return and pay any taxes owed, or file for the automatic six-month extension and pay the tax you estimate to be due. Usually April 15 is the due date, but because Friday, April 15, is a legal holiday in the District of Columbia (where the IRS is headquartered), the filing date is advanced to the next day that isn’t a weekend or holiday – Monday, April 18 – even for taxpayers not living in DC.

    In addition, the April 18, 2016 deadline also applies to the following:

    Tax year 2015 balance-due payments – Taxpayers that are filing extensions are cautioned that the filing extension is an extension to file, NOT an extension to pay a balance due.  Late payment penalties and interest will be assessed on any balance due, even for returns on extension.  Taxpayers anticipating a balance due will need to estimate this amount and include their payment with the extension request.

    Tax year 2015 contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA – April 18 is the last day contributions for 2015 can be made to either a Roth or traditional IRA, even if an extension is filed.

    Individual estimated tax payments for the first quarter of 2016 – Taxpayers, especially those who have filed for an extension, are cautioned that the first installment of the 2016 estimated taxes are due on April 18.  If you are on extension and anticipate a refund, all or a portion of the refund can be allocated to this quarter’s payment on the final return when it is filed at a later date. If the refund won’t be enough to fully cover the first installment, you may need to make a payment with the April 18 voucher. Please call this office for any questions.

    Individual refund claims for tax year 2012 – The regular three-year statute of limitations expires on April 18 for the 2012 tax return.  Thus, no refund will be granted for a 2012 original or amended return that is filed after April 18. Caution: The statute does not apply to balances due for unfiled 2012 returns.

    Note: The deadline for any of the above actions is increased by an additional day, to April 19, 2016, for taxpayers who live in Maine or Massachusetts because of a holiday observed on the 18th in Massachusetts which affects the IRS Service Center located in Massachusetts that serves these two states.

    If this office is holding up the completion of your returns because of missing information, please forward that information as quickly as possible in order to meet the April 18 deadline.  Keep in mind that the last week of tax season is very hectic, and your returns may not be completed if you wait until the last minute.  If it is apparent that the information will not be available in time for the April 18 deadline, then let the office know right away so that an extension request, and 2016 estimated tax vouchers if needed, may be prepared.

    If your returns have not yet been completed, please call Dagley & Co. right away so that we can schedule an appointment and/or file an extension if necessary.

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  • ACA Reporting Relief for Employers

    27 January 2016
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    Are you currently an employer? With new requirements on filing forms with employees, there is at least some form of relief. Beginning the 2015 tax year, Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) are required file Forms 1095-C and 1094-C with the IRS and provide a copy of the 1095-C to each of their employees. An ALE is generally an employer with 50 or more equivalent full time employees (EFTEs) in the prior year. Even though ALE’s with 99 or fewer EFTEs are not subject to the insurance mandate for 2015, they are subject to the 1094-C and 1095-C filing requirements for 2015.

    Because this is the first year for this requirement, the IRS has decided to provide first year (2015) filing relief for Forms 1095-B and 1095-C. The due dates for furnishing these forms are extended. First, The due date for providing the 2015 Form 1095-B and the 2015 Form 1095-C to the insured and employees is extended from February 1, 2016, to March 31, 2016. Second, The due date for health coverage providers and employers to furnish the 2015 Form 1094-B and the 2015 Form 1094-C to the IRS is extended from February 29, 2016, to May 31, 2016 if not filing electronically. Lastly, The due date for health coverage providers and employers electronically filing the 2015 Form 1094-B and the 2015 Form 1094-C with the IRS is extended from March 31, 2016, to June 30, 2016.

    While the IRS is prepared to accept information reporting returns beginning in January 2016, employers and other coverage providers who can’t meet the original deadlines are encouraged to furnish statements and file the information returns as soon as they are ready.

    The information provided to individuals on their copy of Form 1095-B or 1095-C is generally used to confirm that the individual had minimum essential coverage (and thus avoid the penalty that applies when not covered for the full year). However, with the extension of the filing dates for these forms, individuals may not have the forms in hand before filing their 2015 returns. For 2015 only, individuals who rely on other information received from their coverage providers about their coverage for purposes of filing their returns need not amend their returns once they receive Form 1095-B or Form 1095-C or any corrections, according to the IRS.

    Likewise, individuals who, when filing their 2015 income tax returns, rely upon other information received from employers about their offers of coverage for purposes of determining eligibility for the premium tax credit need not amend their returns once they receive their Forms 1095-C or any corrected Forms 1095-C.

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  • January 2016 Tax Due Dates for Businesses

    7 January 2016
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    Yesterday, we covered the January 2016 tax due dates for individuals.

    There is only one deadline for business owners to remember: on January 15, your Employer’s Monthly Deposit is due. If you are an employer and the monthly deposit rules apply, January 15 is the due date for you to make your deposit of Social Security, Medicare and withheld income tax for December 2015. This is also the due date for the nonpayroll withholding deposit for December 2015 if the monthly deposit rule applies. Employment tax deposits must be made electronically (no more paper coupons), except employers with a deposit liability under $2,500 for a return period may remit payments quarterly or annually with the return.

    If you are a small- or medium-sized business owner, and you don’t have a CPA lined up for the upcoming tax season, we would love to take you on as a client. Dagley & Co. specializes in businesses like yours, and we have a stellar track record. You can find our information at the bottom of this screen. We look forward to working with you!

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  • January 2016 Tax Due Dates for Individuals

    6 January 2016
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    January

    It’s a new year, and a new month – and with it comes a fresh set of tax due dates and guidelines. Begin the new year on the right track and abide by these to have your best financial year ever.

    January – Time to Call Dagley & Co. for Your Tax Appointment

    January is the beginning of tax season. If you have not yet made an appointment with us to have your taxes prepared, we encourage you do so as soon as you can so we can best work with each other’s schedules.

    January 11 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during December, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than January 11.

    January 15 – Individual Estimated Tax Payment Due

    This is the time to make your fourth quarter estimated tax installment payment for the 2015 tax year.

    January 15 – Farmers & Fishermen Estimated Tax Payment Due

    If you are a farmer or fisherman whose gross income for 2014 or 2015 is two-thirds from farming or fishing, it is time to pay your estimated tax for 2015 using Form 1040-ES. You have until April 18, 2016 to file your 2015 income tax return (Form 1040). If you do not pay your estimated tax by January 15, you must file your 2015 return and pay any tax due by March 1, 2016 to avoid an estimated tax penalty.

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  • Everything You Need To Know about the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015

    22 December 2015
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    On Friday, Congress reached a bipartisan agreement on tax extenders, named “Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015”. Much to everyone’s surprise, some were made permanent while others were only extended for a period of time. Though the PATH act is not perfect, many are touting the act as a win for local economies and working families. Congress also modified several provisions and added new ones to reduce tax fraud.

    Here is a look at some of the key provisions included in the legislation that pertain to individuals, small businesses, and certain energy-related provisions:

    INDIVIDUAL PROVISIONS:

    • Child Credit – This credit was made permanent; it provides a $1,000 credit for each dependent child who is under the age of 17 at year’s end, who lived with the taxpayer for over half of the year and who meets the relationship test. The credit phases out for higher-income taxpayers, and a portion of the credit is refundable for lower-income taxpayers. The changes also include program integrity provisions that prohibit an individual from retroactively claiming the child credit by amending a return (or filing an original return if he or she failed to file) for any prior year in which the individual for whom the credit is claimed did not have an ITIN – generally a Social Security number).

    After 2015, when a taxpayer improperly claims the credit, the legislation includes a disallowance period when no credit is allowed. For fraud, the disallowance period is 10 years, and for reckless or intentional disregard of rules and regulations, the disallowance period is 2 years.

    • American Opportunity Credit (AOTC) – This credit, which was due to expire after 2017, has been made permanent. This is a tax credit equal to 40% of the cost of tuition and qualifying expenses for higher education, with a maximum credit of $2,500. The credit applies to 100% of the first $2,000 and 25% of the next $2,000 of qualifying expenses. The credit offsets any tax liability, and 40% of the credit is refundable even if the taxpayer does not have any tax liability. It also phases out between $160,000 and $180,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly and between $80,000 and $90,000 for others – except for married taxpayers filing separately, who get no credit.

    After 2015, when a taxpayer improperly claims the credit, the legislation includes a disallowance period when no credit is allowed. For fraud, the disallowance period is 10 years, and for reckless or intentional disregard of rules and regulations, the disallowance period is 2 years.

    A provision was added that prohibits an individual from retroactively claiming the AOTC by amending a return or filing a late original return for any prior year when the individual or a student for whom the credit is claimed did not have an ITIN (generally a Social Security number).

    • Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) – The EITC is a refundable credit allowed to certain low-income workers who have W-2 wages and self-employed income. The credit is larger for taxpayers with children. The credit for taxpayers with children is based upon the number of children; those with three or more children receive the highest credit – as much as $6,269 in 2015. The higher credit for three or more children, which was a temporary provision that was set to expire after 2017, has been made permanent.

    The changes also include added program integrity provisions that prohibit an individual from retroactively claiming the AOTC by amending a return (or filing an original return if the individual failed to file) for any prior year in which the individual for whom the credit is claimed did not have an ITIN (generally a Social Security number). The changes also reduced the marriage penalty by increasing the income phase-out for those filing jointly.

    • Teachers’ $250 Above-the-Line Deduction – This provision, which was available from 2002 through 2014, allows teachers and other eligible educators (levels kindergarten through grade 12) to take an above-the-line deduction of up to $250 for unreimbursed expenses incurred as part of their educational work. This deduction has been made permanent and modified by adjusting the $250 for inflation in years after 2015. In addition, professional development expenses were added to the qualified expenses allowed as part of the $250 deduction.
    • Transit Pass & Parking Fringe Benefit Parity – From 2010 through 2014, the monthly exclusion amount for employer-paid transit passes and qualified parking were temporarily the same. The parity of these two fringe benefits has been made permanent. Thus, for 2015 they will both be $250.
    • Optional Deduction of State and Local General Sales Taxes – Since 2004, taxpayers who itemized their deductions have had the option to deduct the Larger of (1) state and local income tax paid during the year, or (2) state and local sales tax paid during the year. This provision, which had been previously extended through 2014, provides the greatest benefit to those taxpayers who reside in a state that has no income tax (which include Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming). This election has been made permanent.
    • Above-the-Line Deduction for Qualified Tuition and Related Expenses – This above-the-line deduction for qualified higher education tuition and related expenses had been available from 2002 through 2014. The deduction includes adjusted gross income (AGI) limitations; it is not allowed for joint filers with an AGI of $160,000 or more ($85,000 for other filing statuses). This deduction has been retroactively extended through 2016.
    • Tax-Free IRA Distributions For Charitable Purposes – This provision was temporarily added in 2004 and originally expired in 2011; it was not extended until late in the year during the years 2012, 2013 and 2014, thus limiting its application in those three years. The provision allows taxpayers age 70.5 and over to directly transfer (not rolled over) funds from their IRA accounts to a qualified charity. The distribution is not taxable, but it does count toward the individuals’ required minimum distribution (RMD) for the year. The maximum allowable transfer is $100,000 per year. No charitable deduction is allowed, as the distribution is not taxable. This provision has been made permanent; it provides four potential tax advantages:
    1. The distribution is not included in income, thus lowering the taxpayer’s AGI, which in turn helps to avoid various AGI phase-outs and limitations.
    2. Keeping the AGI lower also helps to minimize the amount of Social Security income that is subject to tax for some taxpayers.
    3. Taxpayers using the standard deduction cannot get a charitable deduction, but they are essentially deducting the charitable deduction from their gross income when making contributions this way.
    4. The transferred distribution counts towards the taxpayer’s RMD for the year.
    • Discharge of Qualified Principal Residence Indebtedness – When an individual loses his or her home to foreclosure, abandonment or short sale or has a portion of his or her loan forgiven under the HAMP mortgage reduction plan, that person generally will end up with cancellation of debt (COD) income. COD income is taxable unless the taxpayer can exclude it. A taxpayer can exclude the COD income in the extent that he or she is insolvent (with debts exceeding assets immediately before the event occurs) using the insolvency exclusion.

    Due to the housing market crash, in 2007, Congress added the qualified principal residence COD exclusion, which allowed taxpayers to exclude COD income to the extent that it was discharged acquisition debt. Acquisition debt is debt originally incurred to acquire a home or substantially improve it – not debt used for other purposes, which is called equity debt. However, equity debt is deemed to be discharged first, thus limiting the exclusion when both equity and acquisition debt are involved in the transaction.

    The qualified principal residence COD exclusion had been previously extended but had expired at the end of 2014. This exclusion has been retroactively extended through 2016 (a two-year extension).

    • Mortgage Insurance Premiums – For tax years 2007 through 2014, taxpayers could deduct (as an itemized deduction) the cost of premiums for qualified mortgage insurance on a qualified personal residence (first or second home). To be deductible, the premiums must have been related to acquisition debt incurred after Dec. 31, 2006. However, this deduction phases out for higher-income taxpayers (generally those whose AGI exceeds $100,000). This provision, which had expired after 2014, has been retroactively extended through 2016, a two-year extension.

    BUSINESS PROVISIONS:

    • Research Credit – Tax law provides a tax credit of up to 20% of qualified expenditures for businesses that develop, design or improve products, processes, techniques, formulas or software (and similar activities). The credit has been available off and on since 1981 without being made permanent. It had been extended several times but had expired at the end of 2014. This credit has been retroactively made permanent. In addition, it is not a tax preference for small businesses.
    • 100% Exclusion of Gain – Certain Small Business Stock – Previously, for stock issued after September 27, 2010, and before January 1, 2015, non-corporate taxpayers could exclude 100% of any gain realized on the sale or exchange of “qualified small business stock” held for more than 5 years. In addition, there was no alternative minimum tax (AMT) preference when the exclusion percentage was 100%. Generally, the term “qualified small business” means any domestic C corporation with assets of $50 million or less. This provision has been made permanent.
    • Differential Wage Payment Credit – Through 2014, eligible small business employers – generally those that have an average of fewer than 50 employees and that pay a individual called into active duty military service all or part of the wages that they would have otherwise received from the employer – can claim a credit. This differential wage payment credit is equal to 20% of up to $20,000 of differential pay made to an employee during the tax year. This credit has been retroactively made permanent; for years after 2015, the credit will apply to any size employer.
    • Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) – Through 2014, employers could elect to claim a WOTC for up to 40% of employees’ first-year wages for hiring workers from targeted groups – not exceeding wages of $6,000 (a maximum credit of $2,400). First-year wages are wages paid during the tax year for work performed during the one-year period beginning on the date when the employee begins work for the employer. This credit has been retroactively extended for five years through 2019; it applies to veterans and non-veterans and adds qualified long-term unemployment recipients to the list of targeted groups for years after 2015.
    • Section 179 Election – Since 2003, the Section 179 election has been temporarily increased from its statutory limit of $25,000 to between $100,000 and $500,000. Since 2010, the expense cap has been $500,000 (or $250,000 on a married-filing-separate tax return), and the investment limit has been $2 million. However, the last extension expired after 2014; without an extension, the cap would have returned to the statutory $25,000 limit in 2015. The statutory expensing limit of $500,000 and the $2 million investment limit have both been made permanent.

    The application of the Section 179 election to “off-the-shelf” computer software, qualified leasehold improvements, qualified restaurant property and qualified retail improvements has also been made permanent.

    • Leasehold and Retail Improvements and Restaurant Property – The class life for qualified leasehold and retail Improvements and restaurant property had been temporarily included in the 15-year depreciation class life, as opposed to the 31-year category. Qualified leasehold and retail Improvements and restaurant property have been retroactively and permanently included in the 15-year MACRS class life.
    • Bonus Depreciation – As a means of stimulating the economy, a 50 percent bonus depreciation was temporarily implemented in 2008 and subsequently extended through 2014. For the period between September 8, 2010, and before January 1, 2012, it was even boosted to 100 percent. Bonus depreciation applies to personal tangible property placed in service during the year for which the original use began with the taxpayer.

    The 50% bonus depreciation has been extended for 2 years (through 2016) for property placed in service before January 1, 2017. This generally applies to property with a class life of 20 years or less, to qualified leasehold improvements and to certain plants bearing fruits and nuts that are planted or grafted before January 1, 2020.

    • Enhanced First-Year Depreciation for Autos and TrucksThis is the so-called “luxury limit” on the deprecation deduction of passenger automobiles and light trucks used for business. For such vehicles placed in service in 2015, the limits are $3,160 and $3,460, respectively. In the past, the bonus depreciation had increased the first-year luxury limits by $8,000. Under the new law, the bonus depreciation applicable to luxury vehicles will be phased out through 2019. Thus, the luxury auto rates will be increased by the following bonus depreciation rates: $8,000 for 2015 through 2017, $6,000 for 2018 and $4,800 for 2019.

    ENERGY PROVISIONS:

    • Residential Energy (Efficient) Property Credit – From 2006 through 2014, a nonrefundable credit had been available for qualified improvements to make the taxpayer’s existing primary home more energy efficient. Qualified improvements generally included insulation, storm windows and doors certain types of energy-efficient roofing materials, and energy-efficient air conditioning and hot-water systems. The credit was equal to 10% of the improvement’s cost (not including installation), with a lifetime credit of $500. The credit has been retroactively extended through 2016 (two years).
    • Credit for Fuel-Cell Vehicles – Through 2014, a taxpayer could claim a credit for vehicles fueled by chemically combining oxygen with hydrogen to create electricity. Generally, the credit was $4,000 for vehicles weighing 8,500 pounds or less (and up to $40,000 for heavier vehicles, depending on their weight). An additional $1,000 to $4,000 credit was available for cars and light trucks to the extent that their fuel economy exceeded the 2002 base fuel economy set forth in the Internal Revenue Code. This credit has been retroactively extended for two years through 2016.

     

    If you have questions related to these or other, less commonly encountered provisions of the new law (Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015), please get in touch with us at Dagley & Co. Benefiting from these provisions for 2015 will require taking action before year’s end, so please call if you need assistance.

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  • December 2015 Tax Due Dates for Business Owners

    9 December 2015
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    December 2015

    Yesterday, we went over the December 2015 tax due dates for individuals. Those of you who read our blog regularly know that we usually follow up with tax due dates for business owners, and voila, here we go:

    December 1 – Employers

    During December, ask employees whose withholding allowances will be different in 2016 to fill out a new Form W4 or Form W4 (SP).

    December 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in November.

    December 15 – Nonpayroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in November.

    December 15 – Corporations

    The fourth installment of estimated tax for 2015 calendar year corporations is due.

    December 31 – Last Day to Set Up a Keogh Account for 2015

    If you are self-employed, December 31 is the last day to set up a Keogh Retirement Account if you plan to make a 2015 Contribution. If the institution where you plan to set up the account will not be open for business on the 31st, you will need to establish the plan before the 31st. Note: there are other options such as SEP plans that can be set up after the close of the year. Please call the office to discuss your options.

    December 31 – Where did the time go?! It’s the last day of the year!

    This is your last call to make financial moves that can affect your tax year. If the actions you wish to take cannot be completed on the 31st or a single day, you should consider taking action earlier than December 31st. Please set up an appointment with Dagley & Co. before this day so we can get you all squared away in time.

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  • December 2015 Tax Due Dates for Individuals

    8 December 2015
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    December

    Have a merry month – and not a stressful month – with these December tax deadline tips from Dagley & Co! Image via public domain.

    December  – Time for Year-End Tax Planning

    December is the month to take final actions to affect your 2015 taxes. Taxpayers with substantial increases or decreases in income, changes in marital status or dependent status, and those who sold property during 2015 should get in touch with us at Dagley & Company for a tax planning consultation appointment. In case you need more reasons, do read our special post from Black Friday about why we may be the perfect accounting firm for you!

    December 10 – Report Tips to Employer

    If you are an employee who works for tips and received more than $20 in tips during November, you are required to report them to your employer on IRS Form 4070 no later than December 10. Your employer is required to withhold FICA taxes and income tax withholding for these tips from your regular wages. If your regular wages are insufficient to cover the FICA and tax withholding, the employer will report the amount of the uncollected withholding in box 12 of your W-2 for the year. You will be required to pay the uncollected withholding when your return for the year is filed.

    December 31 – Last Day to Make Mandatory IRA Withdrawals

    Last day to withdraw funds from a Traditional IRA Account and avoid a penalty if you turned age 70½ before 2015. If the institution holding your IRA will not be open on December 31, you will need to arrange for withdrawal before that date.

    December 31 – Last Day to Pay Deductible Expenses for 2015

    Last day to pay deductible expenses for the 2015 return (doesn’t apply to IRA, SEP or Keogh contributions, all of which can be made after December 31, 2015). Taxpayers who are making state estimated payments may find it advantageous to prepay the January state estimated tax payment in December (Please call the office for more information).

    December 31 – Where did the time go?! Last Day of the Year!

    If the actions you wish to take cannot be completed on the 31st or a single day, you should consider taking action earlier than December 31st.

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  • Dagley & Co’s Six Best Practices in Billings and Collections

    5 November 2015
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    Have a small business? One area where you can improve cash flow is in billings and collections. Getting paid late can often hurt a business, and there are ways to get paid faster so you can keep growing. Here are six best practices that can make a real difference in your cash balance at the end of every month.

    1. Get it right.

    One legitimate reason for nonpayment is a confusing or inaccurate invoice. Make sure your invoices spell out in clear, plain English what was purchased, the price, when payment is due, the customer’s PO number, when it was shipped, to where it was shipped, and any tracking number. We highly recommend QuickBooks for all of our clients for easy invoicing and payments.

    You may also want to tighten your sales process. Don’t start work without a formal PO from your business customers—many companies won’t pay against a verbal PO. When you receive a PO, make sure that it matches your quotation. Companies often put their payment terms on their paperwork, so if your customer tries to play this game, resolve any discrepancies before you start work.

    Finally, make certain every shipment and invoice is 100% correct. Set up processes to assure the customer gets exactly what was ordered and that invoices are equally accurate.

    2. Get it out.

    See that four-day-old pile of shipping papers waiting to be invoiced? That’s a pile of cash you can’t collect.

    Set a goal to issue all invoices within one working day of the ship date or completion of work. If your team struggles to meet this, give them the tools and/or manpower to make it happen. And if an invoice gets held up internally, make sure your supervision is immediately notified so the problem can be quickly resolved.

    To further speed payments, try to invoice your customers by email. Some won’t accept emailed invoices, but getting even a portion of your billing done electronically will help overall cash flow.

    3. Get it to the right person.

    How many times has one of your employees called about a past-due payment and been told “we didn’t receive your invoice” or “that needs to be approved by the department manager”? It’s another game, one that can take weeks to play out. As part of getting an accurate customer PO, make sure your sales staff gets a valid address for invoicing.

    Large sales deserve special attention. Where applicable, have your salesperson get the contact information for the customer employee that will approve payment. This might be a department or plant manager and maybe even the business owner. Also get the contact information for the customer’s finance-side people (accounting manager, accounts payable clerk), who will cut and approve the check. When your invoice goes out, make sure they all get a copy.

    4. Get it sooner.

    Offer a discount for early payment—for example, 2% off for payment within 10 days. Not all of your customers will take advantage of this, but it’s a great way to pull cash in.

    5. Get friendly.

    The best way to get paid on time is to build a positive working relationship with your customer before the money is due.

    Have your salesperson call his or her customer contacts shortly after the invoice goes out. Confirm the product has been received or affirm that your assignment is now complete. Ask them if they’re satisfied with your work, what you can do better to improve, and if they’ve received your invoice. This communicates (in a nice way) that it’s time to start the payment process. If these calls uncover problems, it’s an opportunity to address them on the spot as opposed to when payment is past due.

    Your employee responsible for collections should also make a call—in this case, to the customer’s finance-side people. Your employee should confirm the receipt of your invoice, remind them of any discounts for early payment, and check whether there are any administrative problems with the document. They should not ask for a payment date. If possible, they should also try to get to know their counterparts. A simple “How’s the weather where you are?” is a great opening that can lead to a long conversations about, well, everything. Your customer’s payables team can be your best friend later in the collections process, but it won’t happen if you have not built a working relationship.

    There’s one other person who needs to get friendly: you, the business owner or general manager. As your company develops large customers make sure you get to know your customer counterparts. A phone call from you asking “How’s my team doing?” is a great way to initiate a conversation and assure customer satisfaction. For very large projects, make a face-to-face visit. It will pay off later. If the time comes when a payment problem needs to be escalated, you will have an established relationship on which to call.

    6. Make it fun.

    Some companies take the “get friendly” notion to the next level. From putting silly “Thank You!” notes on their invoices, to handing out promotional swag, to sending little stuffed animals for on-time payment, it’s amazing how these goofy gimmicks can change the atmosphere around the collection process.

    You want your customer to smile and shake his head as he signs the check to pay your bill. And if the day comes when your customer needs to decide whom to pay and whom to put off, chances are he will pay you first.

    In Closing

    What about the actual collections process? Good companies contact their customers if a payment is more than five working days late. You should do the same.

    What’s different is that you’ve laid the foundation for a successful endgame. Any excuses for non-payment have been addressed. Your people know whom to call, and you have working contacts who will give you straight answers. Above all, you’ve strengthened the relationship with your customer and have built a basis for future business.

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  • November 2015 Business Due Dates

    1 November 2015
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    It’s hard to believe the end of 2015 is near! Before we list out the tax due dates for businesses, we want to take a moment to remind you to set up a meeting or a phone call with a member of our team at Dagley & Co. so you can get your 2015 taxes squared away. Still not convinced? Read our hundreds of testimonials, compiled by TurboTax from real clients over the last few years.

    November 2 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld

    Income Tax File Form 941 for the third quarter of 2015. Deposit or pay any undeposited tax under the accuracy of deposit rules. If your tax liability is less than $2,500, you can pay it in full with a timely filed return. If you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time, you have until November 10 to file the return.

    November 2 – Certain Small Employers

    Deposit any undeposited tax if your tax liability is $2,500 or more for 2015, but less than $2,500 for the third quarter.

    November 2 – Federal Unemployment Tax

    Deposit the tax owed through September if more than $500.

    November 10 -Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    File Form 941 for the third quarter of 2015. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the quarter in full and on time.

    November 15 – Social Security, Medicare and Withheld Income Tax

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in October.

    November 15 – Nonpayroll Withholding

    If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in October.

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